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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Sign Languages > African Languages   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
CHINESE LANGUAGES
SAN LANGUAGES
MATRIX LINGUISTICS
ARABIC-BASED ORTHOGRAPHIES
SEVERAL AFRICAN LANGUAGES
ELEMENTS
TURNER
LEVELS
SOUTH AFRICA
COMMON
BROADCASTING
CLASSIFICATION
GREENBERG
BANTU
VOCABULARY
LINGUISTICS
GRAMMAR
SOUND SYSTEM
RELATIVELY UNCOMMON
IRANIAN LANGUAGES
IRANIAN LANGUAGE
LANGUAGES SPOKEN
AUSTRONESIAN LANGUAGE FAMILY
FRENCH
OFFICIAL LANGUAGE
BANTU LANGUAGES
COMMON ORIGIN
OFFICIAL LANGUAGES
AFRICAN UNION
SIGN LANGUAGES
WORDS
SINO-TIBETAN LANGUAGES
STRONG INFLUENCES
ETHNOLOGUE
AFRICA
PORTUGUESE
ENGLISH
AFRIKAANS
SPOKEN
CREOLE
LANGUAGES
AFRICAN LANGUAGES
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "African Languages"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. African languages, the subject of his first foray into linguistics, were at that time the fief largely of British and French linguists.
  2. Several African languages are whistled or drummed to communicate over long distances. (Web site)
  3. Several African languages are also whistled for special purposes.

Chinese Languages

  1. The Shanghainese tonal system is instead similar to African languages; different from other Chinese languages, Thai and Vietnamese. (Web site)

San Languages

  1. The Khoikhoi and San languages have had a strong impact on some African languages: we have in mind the existence of clicks in some of the Nguni languages. (Web site)

Matrix Linguistics

  1. Tagmemic and matrix linguistics applied to selected African languages.

Arabic-Based Orthographies

  1. The term Ajami, which comes from the Arabic root for "foreign", has been applied to Arabic-based orthographies of African languages. (Web site)

Several African Languages

  1. On any one plantation, several African languages were spoken.

Elements

  1. It has its origins in the culture of enslaved Americans and also has roots in England, mixed with elements of West African languages. (Web site)

Turner

  1. Turner identified over 300 loanwords from various African languages in Gullah and almost 4,000 African personal names used by Gullah people. (Web site)

Levels

  1. Every effort should be made to develop African languages at all levels of education. (Web site)
  2. While completing coursework at UIUC, Edward taught Kiswahili at all levels and served as Supervising Teaching Assistant for the African Languages Program. (Web site)

South Africa

  1. The role of African languages in South Africa is complex and ambiguous. (Web site)

Common

  1. Tonal sandhi processes like tone spread, tone shift, and downstep and downdrift are common in African languages. (Web site)
  2. AAVE also has grammatical origins in, and pronunciational characteristics in common with, various West African languages.

Broadcasting

  1. In 1981, a second channel was introduced, broadcasting in African languages such as Zulu, Xhosa, Sotho and Tswana.

Classification

  1. Data for several African languages is not sufficient for classification. (Web site)

Greenberg

  1. The following development has been described by Greenberg (1978) for African languages (cf. (Web site)

Bantu

  1. Like the great majority of other Bantu and African languages, Zulu is tonal. (Web site)

Vocabulary

  1. AAVE also has pronunciation, grammatical structures, and vocabulary in common with various West African languages. (Web site)

Linguistics

  1. She has since taught in the African Languages Program at Boston University and has served as a Fulbright lecturer in linguistics at the University of Niamey. (Web site)

Grammar

  1. Its grammar and vocabulary also include elements of Carib and African languages.

Sound System

  1. Turner found that Gullah is strongly influenced by African languages in its sound system, vocabulary, grammar, sentence structure, and semantic system. (Web site)

Relatively Uncommon

  1. Phoneme types that are relatively uncommon in African languages include uvular consonants, diphthongs, and front rounded vowels.

Iranian Languages

  1. The Iranian languages are a major component of the Indo-European family, and an important link between Asian, European and African languages.

Iranian Language

  1. Linguistics link the Iranian language to African languages. (Web site)

Languages Spoken

  1. Of the 70 or more languages spoken in Ethiopia, most belong to the Semitic and Cushitic branches of the Afro-Asiatic family (see African Languages). (Web site)

Austronesian Language Family

  1. It is a member of the Austronesian language family, and not related to African languages. (Web site)

French

  1. The local patois is a mix of French, Spanish and various African languages.
  2. It is increasingly used in literature and music, and official recognition.[ 5] It evolved from French, African languages, and Carib.

Official Language

  1. French is the official language but African languages, such as Bambara and Songhai, are widely spoken in Mali. (Web site)

Bantu Languages

  1. There are African languages (especially the Bantu languages) which have a higher number of classes. (Web site)

Common Origin

  1. Such shared traits probably are not due to a common origin of all African languages. (Web site)

Official Languages

  1. The official languages of Chad are French and Arabic, but numerous African languages are spoken. (Web site)

African Union

  1. For example, all African languages are considered official languages of the African Union (AU). 2006 was declared by AU as the "Year of African Languages". (Web site)
  2. The African Union promotes the use of African languages wherever possible in its official work. (Web site)

Sign Languages

  1. In addition, African languages include several unclassified languages and sign languages. (Web site)

Words

  1. A lesser number of words have entered American English from French and West African languages. (Web site)
  2. Many of the words used in the Antiguan dialect are derived from British as well as African languages. (Web site)

Sino-Tibetan Languages

  1. Tones and monosyllabic is not unique to Sino-Tibetan languages, they are also presented in many African languages.

Strong Influences

  1. Gullah, an English-African creole language spoken on the Sea Islands of South Carolina and Georgia, retains strong influences of West African languages.

Ethnologue

  1. Ethnologue.com's Africa: A listing of African languages and language families. (Web site)

Africa

  1. When European slavers arrived in Africa to abduct slaves, they found that the African languages exhibited very little mixing.
  2. The modern scientific study of the classification and distribution of African languages has thrown some light on the history of Africa and its inhabitants. (Web site)

Portuguese

  1. Portuguese is the official language, but Crioulo (a Portuguese creole) and a number of African languages are also spoken. (Web site)
  2. Second, the claims of linguistic similarity between creoles and Portuguese or between creoles and West African languages are grossly exaggerated. (Web site)

English

  1. Martinique's Creole is based on French and African languages with elements of English, Spanish, and Portuguese. (Web site)
  2. The co-existence of these African languages with English, French and Arabic is examined as well. (Web site)
  3. At the center of Gullah culture was the Gullah language, which drew most of its vocabulary from English and its grammar from West African languages.

Afrikaans

  1. South African English, for example, is littered with words and phrases from Afrikaans, isiZulu, Nama and other African languages.
  2. South African English is an established and unique dialect, with strong influences from Afrikaans and the country's many African languages.

Spoken

  1. The Venda speak a language that differs substantially from any of the other African languages spoken in South Africa. (Web site)
  2. English is the official language, but is spoken by only about 20% of the people; African languages are used extensively. (Web site)
  3. Some 50 African languages have more than half a million speakers each, but many others are spoken by relatively few people. (Web site)

Creole

  1. To facilitate communication between the slaves and the French, a creole was formed by combining French with elements of various African languages.

Languages

  1. Ndyuka is based on English and African languages, with influences from Portuguese and other languages.
  2. Although more than 50 languages have 500,000 or more speakers each, the majority of African languages are spoken by relatively few people. (Web site)

African Languages

  1. The latter, is a creole based on the French and African languages, with some English, Taíno, Portuguese, and Spanish influences.
  2. Ndyuka is based on English and African languages, with influences from French and other languages.
  3. Founded in 2001, the African Academy of Languages promotes the usage and perpetuation of African languages amongst African people. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Sign Languages
  2. African People
  3. Language Families
  4. Cities > Capitals > Addis Ababa > African Union
  5. Creole
  6. Books about "African Languages" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "African Languages"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Links checked: April 11, 2013.
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