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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nature > Life > Organisms > Fungi > Algae   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
OXYGEN
SEDIMENT
YEAST
LARVAE
EGGS
WORMS
FRAGMENTATION
ROCKS
BILLION YEARS
LIMPETS
GASTROPODS
SEXUALLY
PHYLUM
SHINGLE
SHINGLES
MOLLUSKS
ZOOSPORE
ZOOSPORES
CARBOHYDRATES
THALLUS
TERRESTRIAL PLANTS
PLANT KINGDOM
OWN FOOD
AMOEBAE
EUKARYOTIC ORGANISMS
SEA HARES
HERBIVOROUS
LAKES
BLUE-GREEN
JATROPHA
PLANTAE
FLOWERING PLANTS
SYMBIOTIC ASSOCIATION
ARCHAEA
UNICELLULAR ORGANISMS
GENERATIONS
ALTERNATION
SEXUAL REPRODUCTION
ANTHERIDIA
NATURAL COMPONENT
CHYTRIDS
LIFE CYCLE
LIFE CYCLES
INVERTEBRATES
MOLDS
MICROSCOPIC ORGANISMS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Algae"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Algae is a programming language for numerical analysis. (Web site)
  2. Algae are found in the fossil record dating back to approximately 3 billion years in the Precambrian. (Web site)
  3. Algae are chlorophyll-bearing unicellular or multicellular plants. (Web site)
  4. Algae are the most important photosynthesizing organisms on Earth.
  5. Red algae are thought to have originated by symbiosis of cyanobacteria (which also have phycoerythrin). (Web site)

Oxygen

  1. Eutrophication - the process of excess nutrients accelerating the growth of algae, oftentimes ultimately depleting the water of oxygen.

Sediment

  1. Today that process takes almost a year,[ 16] and sediment, nutrients, and algae can cause problems in local waters. (Web site)

Yeast

  1. Many organisms such as bacteria, amoeba, some algae, and yeast are composed of only a single cell.
  2. As we noted earlier, bacteria, blue-green algae, most protozoa, yeast, and flatworms all reproduce asexually, as do mosses and starfish. (Web site)
  3. Here's a few benzene, mold, kerosene, styrene, algae, yeast, sand, fecal coliforms, glass particles, sanitizer and crickets.

Larvae

  1. The larvae attach to the algae where, within 24 hours, they metamorphose into hungry juvenile slugs that begin feeding.

Eggs

  1. In captivity, tadpoles have been raised on a variety of diets, ranging from algae to the eggs of other dart frogs, but with minimal success.
  2. On the diet of jellyfish is tiny larvae of oysters, whelks, eggs of fish, little crustaceans, tiny bristle worms, and multitudes of algae.
  3. Omnivorous, wood frog tadpoles feed on plant detritus, algae and also attack and eat eggs and larvae of amphibians, including those of wood frogs [ 4]. (Web site)

Worms

  1. The trap's walls are covered in algae, worms and sea anemones.

Fragmentation

  1. Red algae use diverse strategies to reproduce, including fragmentation and spore production.

Rocks

  1. Entoprocta Entoprocts 150 Small marine animals, mostly sedentary, living in colonies attached to rocks, shells, algae or other animals. (Web site)
  2. About 20% of the known species are benthic and can attach to algae or rocks. (Web site)
  3. Radulae are diverse within the Mollusca, ranging from structures used to scrape algae off rocks, to the harpoon-like structures of cone snail s.

Billion Years

  1. It suggests that algae knew about quantum mechanics nearly two billion years before humans," says Scholes.
  2. Regardless, the eukaryotic algae did not appear until about 1.5 Ba, some 2 billion years after stromatolites significantly began forming. (Web site)

Limpets

  1. Also, where the limpets eat the algae off bare rocks, it creates places where other organisms can grow and thrive. (Web site)
  2. References Wootton, J. T. 1992. Indirect effects, prey susceptibility, and habitat selection: impacts of birds on limpets and algae. (Web site)

Gastropods

  1. Most gastropods use their radula to graze on algae or plant material. (Web site)
  2. A typical marine community consisted of these animals, plus red and green algae, primitive fish, cephalopods, corals, crinoids, and gastropods. (Web site)
  3. For example, Gastropods use it to graze and scrape diatoms and other microscopic algae off rock surfaces and other substrata.

Sexually

  1. Most green algae reproduce both sexually and asexually.

Phylum

  1. Algae in this phylum typically have an eyespot that can detect light.
  2. Chlorophyta This phylum consists of the red algae, almost all of which are multicellular.
  3. Chytridiomycota This phylum is commonly known as the green algae.

Shingle

  1. It exists as a brown to black discoloration of the shingle and is caused by an algae known as Gloeocapsa.

Shingles

  1. As the algae breaks down the shingles, the granules that protect the shingle are loosened and begin to fall off.
  2. Most of these shingles have the additional attribute of resisting the growth of algae (commonly called fungus), especially in damp regions. (Web site)

Mollusks

  1. Mollusks use them to chew food and to scrape algae from rocks.

Zoospore

  1. Zoospore s: mobile spores that move by means of one or more flagella, and can be found in some algae and fungi. (Web site)

Zoospores

  1. Zoospores: mobile spores that move by means of one or more flagella, and can be found in some algae and fungi. (Web site)
  2. Y Z Zoospores A motile flagellated spore that serves as a means of asexual reproduction among certain algae, fungi, and protoctists.

Carbohydrates

  1. The fungi obtain carbohydrates from the algae, which are photosynthetic and contribute the green color to the lichen thallus. (Web site)

Thallus

  1. Thallus - The leaf-like bodies of algae. (Web site)
  2. The central portion of a thallus in certain lichens and red or brown algae. (Web site)

Terrestrial Plants

  1. Secondary pigments are also like those of terrestrial plants and it is thought that the green algae are the ancestors of terrestrial plants.

Plant Kingdom

  1. Most algae, fungi, and microbes are no longer considered to be in the plant kingdom.
  2. Some taxonomists advocate including the Chlorophyta (green algae) in the Plant kingdom. (Web site)

Own Food

  1. Because fungi can't produce their own food (photosynthesis) they sometimes form symbiotic relationships with algae. (Web site)

Amoebae

  1. Giant viruses are nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) that infect algae (phycodnaviruses) and amoebae (Mimivirus).

Eukaryotic Organisms

  1. Reproductive spores are formed in many eukaryotic organisms, such as plants, algae and fungi, during their normal reproductive life cycle.

Sea Hares

  1. Studies are being conducted on the acquiring of secondary metabolites in sea hares, including metabolites from algae in Aplysia dactylomela.
  2. Sea hares appear to accumulate most secondary metabolites from red algae (Rogers, 2000).
  3. Order Anaspidea Shell reduced to flat plate; feed on large seaweed rather than microscopic algae; sea hares (Aplysiidae); 1 other small family.

Herbivorous

  1. Most tadpoles are herbivorous, subsisting on algae and plants. (Web site)
  2. The Aplysiidae are herbivorous, eating a variety of red, green or brown algae and eelgrass.

Lakes

  1. One major problem all over the planet that has resulted from the use of synthetic fertilizers is the increased growth of algae in lakes and water reservoirs. (Web site)
  2. Spirulina is a type of blue-green algae found in most lakes and ponds.

Blue-Green

  1. In this way they filter plankton, red and blue-green algae, insects, fish, mollusks, and small crustaceans from the water. (Web site)
  2. The cyanobacteria (also referred to as blue-green algae) have chlorophyll a similar to green plants and are photosynthetic autotrophs (Figure 2.2).
  3. Surprisingly, the blue-green algae are also food for the fungi.

Jatropha

  1. To grow plants that (naturally) produce oils, such as algae, or jatropha. (Web site)
  2. Examples of possible sources for sustainable aviation fuel are: algae, camelina, halophytes, jatropha, and non-food cellulose. (Web site)

Plantae

  1. The Archaeplastida, or Plantae, comprises glaucophytes, red algae, green algae and plants.

Flowering Plants

  1. In general it cannot be assumed this means all plants, algae through flowering plants.

Symbiotic Association

  1. Hydra have a symbiotic association with another type of algae that will be discussed briefly. (Web site)

Archaea

  1. Photosynthesis occurs in plants, algae, and many species of Bacteria, but not in Archaea. (Web site)

Unicellular Organisms

  1. In 1866, E.H. Haeckel, a German zoologist, suggested the name Protista to include all unicellular organisms (bacteria, algae, fungi, and protozoa). (Web site)

Generations

  1. Some species of red algae have a complex triphasic alternation of generations.

Alternation

  1. Alternation of generations, where the algae alternates between gametophyte and sporophyte generations, is common among the multicellular green algae.

Sexual Reproduction

  1. It includes most of the fungi that combine with algae to form lichens, and the majority of fungi that lack morphological evidence of sexual reproduction.
  2. This cycle, from gametophyte to gametophyte, is the way in which plants and many algae undergo sexual reproduction.
  3. This cycle, from gametophyte to gametophyte, is the way in which all land plants and many algae undergo sexual reproduction. (Web site)

Antheridia

  1. Many algae and some fungi, for example ascomycetes and water moulds, also have antheridia during their reproductive stages.
  2. Various members of the algae that reproduce sexually also display alternation of generations, producing sperms and eggs in antheridia and oogonia. (Web site)

Natural Component

  1. Hydrogen gas is produced by some bacteria and algae and is a natural component of flatus. (Web site)

Chytrids

  1. Higher plants and fungi do not produce flagellate cells, but the closely related green algae and chytrids do. (Web site)

Life Cycle

  1. Most fungi and algae are haploid during the principal stage of their life cycle. (Web site)
  2. Most algae, fern, mosses and some vascular plants go through these separate phases in their life cycle. (Web site)
  3. A multicellular sporophyte generation or phase is present in the life cycle of all land plants and in some green algae. (Web site)

Life Cycles

  1. Spores form part of the life cycles of many plant s, algae, fungi and some protozoan s. (Web site)

Invertebrates

  1. Lead adversely affects algae, invertebrates, and fish.
  2. Thus the periphyton community comprises bacteria, fungi, protozoa, algae, zooplankton and other invertebrates. (Web site)
  3. In an aquarium buffering substances are consumed by calcareous algae and invertebrates and by the acid waste products of fish.

Molds

  1. Microbe - a general or non-specific term for any microorganism such as bacteria, fungi (molds), algae, or protozoa.

Microscopic Organisms

  1. Microbiologists investigate the growth and characteristics of microscopic organisms such as bacteria, algae, or fungi.
  2. Plankton: Microscopic organisms like algae and protozoa that drift on the oceans' currents. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Nature > Life > Organisms > Fungi
  2. Science > Biology > Botany > Plants
  3. Chemistry > Biochemistry > Metabolism > Photosynthesis
  4. Corals
  5. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nature > Life > Organisms

Subcategories

Dinoflagellates

    Related Keywords

      * Animals * Asexually * Blue-Green Algae * Brown Algae * Bryophytes * Cell Walls * Certain Fungi * Chlorophyll * Chloroplasts * Coral * Corals * Cyanobacteria * Detritus * Diatoms * Discoloration * Eukaryotes * Feed * Feeding * Ferns * Fish * Food * Fungi * Fungus * Green Algae * Growth * Herbivores * Higher Plants * Kelp * Kingdom Protista * Lichen * Lichens * Live * Microorganisms * Mitochondria * Moss * Mosses * Multicellular * Nutrients * Nutritional Supplement * Oomycetes * Organisms * Photosynthesis * Photosynthetic * Photosynthetic Organisms * Plants * Plastids * Protists * Protozoa * Protozoans * Red Algae * Reefs * Seaweed * Seaweeds * Slime Molds * Snails * Species * Spirulina * Sponges * Spores * Sunlight * Symbiosis * Symbiotic Relationship * Unicellular * Water * Yeasts
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      Short phrases about "Algae"
      Originally created: August 01, 2010.
      Links checked: February 03, 2013.
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