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Amino Acids       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nature > Chemistry > Biochemistry > Amino Acids   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
COMPLEX MOLECULES
CARBOHYDRATES
LINEAR CHAINS
CELLS
METABOLIC PATHWAYS
ANIMAL PROTEINS
CASEIN
HORMONES
BODY NEEDS
DIPEPTIDES
SHORT CHAINS
DNA
CARBON SKELETONS
ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS
NUTRIENTS
NON-ESSENTIAL
DIETARY PROTEINS
COMMON AMINO ACIDS
STANDARD AMINO ACIDS
HUMAN BODY
NONESSENTIAL
NONESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS
BRANCHED-CHAIN AMINO ACIDS
NON-ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS
FOOD
PROCESS
MINERALS
NITROGEN
MUSCLES
MUSCLE
GLUCOSE
METABOLISM
FOODS
HUMANS
VITAMIN
ENZYMES
SYNTHESIS
TWENTY AMINO ACIDS
GENBANK ACCESSION
SPECIFIC AMINO
SINGLE AMINO
STANDARD GENETIC
CREATINE
CODON
SIDE CHAINS
TAURINE
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Amino Acids"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins.
  2. Amino acids are usually classified by the properties of the side chain into four groups.
  3. Amino acids are essential to the human body.
  4. Amino acids are the building blocks of long polymer chains.
  5. Amino acids are usually classified by properties of the side chain into four groups: acidic, basic, hydrophilic ( polar), and hydrophobic ( nonpolar).

Complex Molecules

  1. The formation of protein can result in dehydration because water molecules are lost as amino acids combine to form more complex molecules.
  2. Heterotrophs, on the other hand, require a source of more complex substances, such as monosaccharides and amino acids, to produce these complex molecules.

Carbohydrates

  1. It is made up of proteins, vitamins, ions, nucleic acids, amino acids, sugars, carbohydrates and fatty acids.
  2. Functions In the small intestine, proteins are changed into amino acids; fats are changed into fatty acids; and carbohydrates are changed into sugars.

Linear Chains

  1. Like all proteins, enzymes are long, linear chains of amino acids that fold to produce a three-dimensional product.
  2. Proteins, or polypeptides, are linear chains of amino acids.

Cells

  1. Insulin also enables cells to take in fatty acids and amino acids to use in the building of lipids and proteins.
  2. Unlike insulin, cortisol causes the cells to increase energy output by using fats and amino acids (proteins) instead of glucose.

Metabolic Pathways

  1. Amino acid synthesis is the set of biochemical processes (metabolic pathways) by which the various amino acids are produced from other compounds.

Animal Proteins

  1. It takes more plant proteins than animal proteins to give the adequate protein percentages, and even at that, some amino acids will be lacking.

Casein

  1. This insulin spike helps deliver those carbs - as well as the amino acids from whey, casein and BCAAs, plus creatine - to your muscle fibers.

Hormones

  1. The amino acids that make up proteins are used for building DNA, cell membranes, hormones, receptors, brain chemicals, and many other molecules in the body.
  2. Polypeptide and proteins: Hormones that are chains of amino acids of less than or more than about 100 amino acids, respectively.

Body Needs

  1. Get the vitamins, minerals, and amino acids your body needs every day.
  2. The amino acids then can be reused to make the proteins your body needs to maintain muscles, bones, blood, and body organs.

Dipeptides

  1. Tri- and dipeptides are digested into amino acids by enzymes in the brush border and contents of midgut absorptive cells.

Short Chains

  1. Peptides are short chains of amino acids; most hormones are peptides.

Dna

  1. Glycine is required to build protein in the body and synthesis of nucleic acids, the construction of RNA, DNA, bile acids and other amino acids in the body.
  2. The central dogma of molecular biology states that the sequence of nucleotides in DNA specifies the order of amino acids in a polypeptide.

Carbon Skeletons

  1. Through a process called gluconeogenesis, our bodies can convert the carbon skeletons of amino acids, glycerol, pyruvate and lactate into glucose.

Essential Fatty Acids

  1. Enzymes that require Vitamin B6 are in involved in metabolism of amino acids and in formation of essential fatty acids.
  2. Vitamin B-6 (Pyridoxine) is involved in the metabolism of amino acids (the building blocks of proteins) and of essential fatty acids.

Nutrients

  1. In other words, the human body will reap the benefit only when the Vitamins, minerals, amino acids and the other nutrients are feed together.

Non-Essential

  1. Such other amino acids that may be present in the composition include essential and non-essential amino acids.

Dietary Proteins

  1. In humans, dietary proteins are broken down by digestion into amino acids, which serve as metabolic fuel for other functional roles in the body.
  2. Amino acids are the "building-blocks" of proteins, however, it is not dietary proteins that make up the human body.

Common Amino Acids

  1. The difference between the 20 common amino acids lies in the nature of a side chain the "R" group.

Standard Amino Acids

  1. There are 20 standard amino acids, each containing a carboxyl group, an amino group, and a side chain (known as an "R" group).

Human Body

  1. Likewise, by the many biochemical processes of the body the amino acids are transformed into proteins which make-up the structure of the human body.

Nonessential

  1. There are the essential amino acids obtained from food and the nonessential amino acids the body can produce.

Nonessential Amino Acids

  1. Glycine is essential for synthesis of nucleic acids, bile acids, and other nonessential amino acids within the body.

Branched-Chain Amino Acids

  1. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) include leucine, isoleucine as well as valine.

Non-Essential Amino Acids

  1. The non-essential amino acids include: alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, cystine, glutamic acid, glycine, hydroxyproline, proline, serine and tyrosine.

Food

  1. The food you eat is how your body gets the amino acids, vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and more to do daily repairs and maintenance.

Process

  1. Translation: The process in which the genetic code carried by mRNA directs the synthesis of proteins from amino acids.

Minerals

  1. These substances which are carried by the blood include nutrients such as glucose, amino acids, vitamins and minerals and, most important of all, oxygen.
  2. As the primary fluid in the body, water serves as a solvent for minerals, vitamins, amino acids, glucose, and many other nutrients.
  3. Such nutrients include, for example, salts, saccharides, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, peptides, and proteins other than the human blood protein.

Nitrogen

  1. These amino acids, formed of carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms, are literally the building blocks of the human body.

Muscles

  1. The proteins made from amino acids are used in the growth, repair and maintenance of muscles, major organs, tendons, nails and hair (1).

Muscle

  1. Amino acids can be derived from the breakdown of body protein (muscle, organs, etc.) as well as dietary protein.
  2. BCAAs did not change muscle protein metabolism, although essential amino acids (EAAs) suppressed muscle protein breakdown in hindlimb-immobilized rats.

Glucose

  1. Insulin, in turn, enables the cells of our body to take up nutrients, principally glucose, but also amino acids, from the blood stream.
  2. When the supply of carbohydrates is too low to adequately supply all the energy needs of the body, amino acids from proteins are converted to glucose.
  3. Food is further digested in the intestines where proteins are broken down to amino acids, and sugars and carbohydrates to glucose, before being absorbed.

Metabolism

  1. Most is found inside your cells where it activates enzymes necessary for the metabolism of carbohydrates and amino acids.

Foods

  1. The body makes its own proteins and obtains amino acids from the digestion of the proteins in the foods that we eat.

Humans

  1. Phenylalanine is one of the "essential" amino acids, meaning that humans must get it from their diet.

Vitamin

  1. Vitamin B6, or pyridoxine, is a water-soluble B vitamin that is important in the functioning of a host of enzymes and amino acids.

Enzymes

  1. Pancreatic juice contains enzymes that break down sugars and starches into simple sugars, fats into fatty acids and glycerol, and proteins into amino acids.

Synthesis

  1. In protein synthesis the mRNA (messenger RNA) moves through the ribosome while amino acids attached to tRNAs (transfer RNAs) are brought to the ribosome.

Twenty Amino Acids

  1. The twenty amino acids can be divided into two groups of 10 amino acids.

Genbank Accession

  1. P30988) contains 16 amino acids in the first intracellular loop that are absent from CTR2 (GenBank accession no.

Specific Amino

  1. Thus the amino acids listed in Table 1 could be said to be CRCV S protein-specific amino acids.

Single Amino

  1. Amino acid repeats (AARs) are segments of proteins made up of simple patterns of amino acids, often strings of a single amino acid.

Standard Genetic

  1. Structures and symbols of the 20 amino acids which are directly encoded for protein synthesis by the standard genetic code.
  2. In reality, all 64 codons of the standard genetic code are assigned for either amino acids or stop signals during translation.

Creatine

  1. Although available in the diet, about 50% creatine used by the body is biosynthesized from methionine and two other amino acids, glycine and arginine.
  2. During proteolysis, the peptide bond that links the amino acids to each other is hydrolyzed, and free amino acids are released.

Codon

  1. Some amino acids are coded for by more than one codon, and some codons do not signal a particular amino acid but rather signal a stop to protein synthesis.
  2. These encode the twenty standard amino acids, giving most amino acids more than one possible codon.

Side Chains

  1. Amino acids which have basic side chains include: lysine, arginine, and histidine.
  2. Globular proteins incorporate a variety of amino acids, many with large side chains and reactive functional groups.

Taurine

  1. All amino acids possess common structural features, including an α-carbon to which an amino group, a carboxyl group, and a variable side chain are bonded.
  2. Amino acid - Amino acids are molecule s containing an amine group, a carboxylic acid group and a side chain that varies between different amino acids.
  3. What about others amino acids: gaba, theanine or tyrosine.
  4. With the exception of taurine, GABA and glycine, most amino acids exist in either the D or L form.

Categories

  1. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nature > Chemistry > Biochemistry
  2. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nature > Chemistry > Molecules
  3. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nature > Chemistry > Bases
  4. Nature > Matter > Atoms > Nitrogen
  5. Nature > Matter > Atoms > Oxygen

Subcategories

Essential Amino Acids (2)
Alanine
Asparagine
Cystine
Glutamic Acid
Glutamine
Leucine
Serine
Transamination

    Related Keywords

      * Amino Acid * Bcaas * Body * Choline * Citric Acid Cycle * Citrulline * Crcv * Essential Amino Acid * Genetic Code * Gsh * Histidine * L-Glutamine * Liver * Molecule * Pdcaas * Peptides * Peptide Bond * Peptide Bonds * Phenylalanine * Pku * Protein * Proteins * Protein Chain * Protein Synthesis * Side Chain * Threonine * Trna * Valine
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