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Amniotic Fluid       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nature > Life > Animals > Fetus > Amniotic Fluid   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
ATANEA
CASES
SKULL
BONE MARROW
ASCENDING
WOMEN
HPV
UMBILICAL CORD
GESTATION
BABY
BREAST MILK
SPINAL CORD
NEURAL TUBE
BRAIN
PRENATAL DIAGNOSIS
SAMPLE
UTERUS
AMNIOTIC SAC
PREGNANCY
FETAL
BILIRUBIN
SAC
DEVELOPING EMBRYO
EMBOLUS
LUNGS
RESULT
UTERO
DESICCATION
NEURAL TUBE DEFECTS
NEURAL TUBE DEFECT
EMBRYO
PLACENTA
AIR BUBBLES
UNBORN CHILD
FETUS
AMNIOTIC FLUID
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Amniotic Fluid"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Amniotic fluid is a buoyant medium that performs four functions for the embryo and fetus. (Web site)
  2. Amniotic fluid is the watery liquid surrounding and cushioning a growing fetus within the amnion.
  3. Amniotic fluid is nearly all fetal urine with a small amount of fluid contributed by the lungs. (Web site)
  4. Amniotic fluid is closely related to urine, and can be analyzed by amniocentesis.
  5. The amniotic fluid is tested for the presence of the sickle cell gene. (Web site)

Atanea

  1. Atanea A dawn goddess in some South Pacific islands, who created the seas when she miscarried and filled the hollows of the earth with amniotic fluid. (Web site)

Cases

  1. Cases of amniotic fluid embolism, which resulted in maternal and fetal death, have been reported with use of misoprostol during pregnancy. (Web site)

Skull

  1. The fetal forebrain is exposed to the amniotic fluid, and fails to develop and degenerates, and the skull itself does not close over.

Bone Marrow

  1. For example, a bullet, bone marrow or amniotic fluid could work its way into a blood vessel during an accident and cause an embolism.
  2. Other types of emboli are fat emboli that originate from bone marrow of fractured bones or amniotic fluid emboli that develop during childbirth.

Ascending

  1. Bacteria from the vagina can access fetal membranes by ascending the cervical canal and then, in some cases, infect amniotic fluid and fetal blood. (Web site)

Women

  1. Nutrient levels in amniotic fluid from women with normal and neural tube defect pregnancies. (Web site)

Hpv

  1. The goal of this study was to determine if HPV could be detected in amniotic fluid from women with intact membranes.
  2. The goal of this study was to determine if HPV can be detected in amniotic fluid from women with intact amniotic membranes.

Umbilical Cord

  1. Jaundice, or yellow coloring of amniotic fluid, umbilical cord, skin, and eyes may be present.

Gestation

  1. Oligohydramnios occurs if the volume of amniotic fluid is less than normal for the corresponding period of gestation. (Web site)

Baby

  1. This time, the obstetrician injected the levothyroxine into the amniotic fluid since the goiter was smaller and the baby was swallowing better. (Web site)
  2. If he suspects hydramnios, he'll order an ultrasound, which can measure the amount amniotic fluid surrounding your baby. (Web site)

Breast Milk

  1. Minute quantities of mesalamine were distributed to breast milk and amniotic fluid of pregnant women following sulfasalazine therapy. (Web site)

Spinal Cord

  1. Fetal skin grafts are used to cover the exposed spinal cord, to protect it from further damage caused by prolonged exposure to amniotic fluid. (Web site)

Neural Tube

  1. Early in development the cavity within the neural tube (which will form the ventricular space) is filled with amniotic fluid.

Brain

  1. Finally, this skull and dural defect permits the brain to be exposed to amniotic fluid, thus destroying the developing forebrain neural cells.
  2. The poorly organized brain is exposed to amniotic fluid and becomes necrotic and hemorrhagic, with death usually within hours after birth. (Web site)
  3. DIC occurs acutely after trauma when brain, fat, amniotic fluid, or other strong thromboplastins enter the circulation. (Web site)

Prenatal Diagnosis

  1. Prenatal diagnosis is routinely available by measuring I2S enzymatic activity in amniotic fluid or in chorionic villus tissue. (Web site)

Sample

  1. Sometimes called an 'amnio', this is a minor surgical diagnostic test that allows the doctor to obtain a sample of the amniotic fluid.

Uterus

  1. This may be due to bacteria ascending from the mother's genital tract into the uterus to infect the membranes and the amniotic fluid.

Amniotic Sac

  1. In amniocentesis, the doctor inserts a needle through the mother's skin into the amniotic sac to collect about an ounce of amniotic fluid. (Web site)

Pregnancy

  1. If bilirubin levels in amniotic fluid remain normal, the pregnancy can be allowed to continue to term and spontaneous labor. (Web site)
  2. Fetal urine production begins in early gestation and comprises the majority of the amniotic fluid in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. (Web site)
  3. A test, done during pregnancy, of a small sample of the amniotic fluid surrounding a fetus, most commonly used to detect birth defects.

Fetal

  1. There is a greater risk of infection, premature labor, and leakage of amniotic fluid with open fetal surgery than there is with fetoscopy.
  2. Uterine rupture, amniotic fluid embolism, severe genital bleeding, shock, fetal bradycardia, and fetal and material death have been reported. (Web site)

Bilirubin

  1. Complications are indicated by high levels of bilirubin in the amniotic fluid or baby's blood or if the ultrasound reveals hydrops fetalis. (Web site)
  2. During pregnancy symptoms may include: With amniocentesis, the amniotic fluid may have a yellow coloring and contain bilirubin.

Sac

  1. The sac contains a liquid (amniotic fluid), which supports, cushions and protects a developing fetus.

Developing Embryo

  1. The amniotic sac fills with a clear liquid (amniotic fluid) and expands to envelop the developing embryo, which floats within it. (Web site)

Embolus

  1. The blockage (an embolus) can be caused by a blood clot, tumor, amniotic fluid, or fat in the artery. (Web site)

Lungs

  1. Pulmonary hypoplasia usually results because the lungs rely on amniotic fluid in their development.

Result

  1. Additionally, the alveolar sacs of the lungs fail to properly develop as a result of the reduced volume of amniotic fluid. (Web site)

Utero

  1. HPV DNA detection in amniotic fluid, foetal membranes, cord blood and placental trophoblastic cells all suggest HPV infection in utero, i.e. (Web site)
  2. NOTES: In utero, lungs contain amniotic fluid.

Desiccation

  1. The amniotic fluid absorbs shock and prevents desiccation of the embryo.

Neural Tube Defects

  1. The amniotic fluid removed can then be studied for detection of neural tube defects and chromosomal abnormalities before the baby is born. (Web site)
  2. Neural tube defects can be detected in utero by determination of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and acetylcholinesterase in the amniotic fluid and maternal blood.

Neural Tube Defect

  1. A neural tube defect (NTD) occurs when the neural tube fails to close properly, leaving the developing brain or spinal cord exposed to the amniotic fluid. (Web site)

Embryo

  1. The amnion forms a sac around the embryo that fills with amniotic fluid to cushion and protect the embryo.
  2. The amnion later loosely surrounds the embryo, forming an amniotic sac filled with amniotic fluid. (Web site)
  3. The amnion is filled with amniotic fluid to cushion the embryo that it surrounds. (Web site)

Placenta

  1. Chromosomal abnormalities such as Turner syndrome can often be diagnosed before birth by analyzing cells in the amniotic fluid or from the placenta.
  2. Ordinarily, only a small amount of AFP gains access to the amniotic fluid and crosses the placenta to mother's blood.

Air Bubbles

  1. Less common causes include air bubbles, fat droplets, amniotic fluid, or clumps of parasites or tumor cells, all of which may lead to a pulmonary embolus. (Web site)
  2. Other things can block an artery, such as tumors, air bubbles, amniotic fluid, or fat that is released into the blood vessels when a bone is broken.
  3. Other less frequent sources of pulmonary embolism are a fat embolus, amniotic fluid embolus, air bubbles, and a deep vein thrombosis in the upper body.

Unborn Child

  1. Bacteria from a mother's mouth can be transmitted through the blood and amniotic fluid in the womb to her unborn child. (Web site)

Fetus

  1. The inner membrane, the amnion, contains the amniotic fluid and the fetus.
  2. Yes. By sampling the amniotic fluid or tissue taken from the placenta, doctors can tell whether a fetus has sickle cell anemia or sickle cell trait.
  3. The fetus floats in amniotic fluid inside the amniotic sac. (Web site)

Amniotic Fluid

  1. A test to see if an unborn child has the disease takes either a blood sample from the fetus or a sample of amniotic fluid. (Web site)
  2. Yet if a woman is pregnant, her fetus may contract TB through blood or by inhaling or swallowing the bacilli present in the amniotic fluid.
  3. The embryo floats in fluid (amniotic fluid), which is contained in a sac (amniotic sac). (Web site)

Categories

  1. Nature > Life > Animals > Fetus
  2. Air Bubbles
  3. Unborn Child
  4. Nature > Life > Animals > Placenta
  5. Nature > Life > Animals > Embryo
  6. Books about "Amniotic Fluid" in Amazon.com

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  Short phrases about "Amniotic Fluid"
  Originally created: August 01, 2010.
  Links checked: July 14, 2013.
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