KeyWEn.com  
 
 
 
Ascus       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Ascomycetes > Ascus   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
EACH ASCUS
SEXUAL REPRODUCTION
ASCUS
NUCLEI
SEXUALLY
DIPLOID ZYGOTE
ASCOSPORES
ASCI
WALL
MEIOSPORES
HOOK
ENCLOSED
FORCIBLY
EIGHT
ASCOMYCETE FUNGI
NUCLEAR FUSION
HAND
RELEASED
FOUR
SPORES
INSIDE
CONTAINS EIGHT
DEVELOPMENT
UNITUNICATE-INOPERCULATE ASCUS
NAMES ASCOMYCOTA
UNITUNICATE
MEIOSPORE
ASCUS VESICLE
NUMEROUS ASCOSPORES
ASCOSPORE DEVELOPMENT
ASCUS DEVELOPMENT
ASCUS TYPES
SINGLE ASCUS
MEIOSPORANGIUM
SACLIKE CELL
BITUNICATE ASCUS
EARLIER
NAMES
FIG
PRESENCE
ORDERS
PRODUCTS
PRODUCTION
FLUID
INNER
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Ascus"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. The ascus is a saclike cell that bursts at maturity releasing eight ascospores.
  2. An ascus is a tube-shaped vessel, a meiosporangium, which contains the sexual spores produced by meiosis.
  3. Ascus: An elongated spore case containing the spores of certain fungi including yeast.
  4. The ascus is a sac-shaped enclosure in the fruiting body of an ascomycete.
  5. Ascus: a sac-like cell containing the ascospores cleaved from within by free cell formation after karyogamy (nuclear fusion) and meiosis.

Each Ascus

  1. Note that there is only one ascus per ascoma, with 8 ascospores. (Web site)
  2. Its apothecium possess operculate asci, with each ascus containing eight uniseriate ascospores.
  3. Each ascus typically develops eight ascospores. (Web site)
  4. Ascus of a hyphal ascomycete (Pezizomycotina) as viewed by the electron microscope, © R. Vilgalys 1996.
  5. Ascospores are bicellular but disarticulate at the septum early in development into 16 part-ascospores so that the ascus appears to contain 16 ascospores. (Web site)

Sexual Reproduction

  1. - - Sexual reproduction of euascomycetes includes formation of a dikaryotic ascus.
  2. During sexual reproduction, the fusion of two cells results in the formation of an ascus.
  3. Sexual reproduction in the Ascomycota is marked by a characteristic structure, the ascus, which distinguishes these fungi from all others.
  4. Ascospores are a general category of spores that have been produced by means of sexual reproduction (in a sack-like structure called an ascus). (Web site)
  5. Ascomycota - Sexual reproduction in a sack called an ascus with the production of ascopspores (figure 1). (Web site)

Ascus

  1. When one ascus bursts, it triggers the bursting of all the other asci in the ascocarp. (Web site)
  2. The Ascomycota are also classified together on the basis of reproductive structures due to the possession of an ascus. (Web site)
  3. For instance, the ascus tip structures are illustrated in the introduction - but also crystals of lichen acids, which are rarely used any more. (Web site)
  4. They form a well-developed mycelium which bears the sexual ( ascus) and asexual (conidium) states. (Web site)
  5. Meiosis, followed by mitosis, in Sordaria results in the formation of eight haploid ascospores contained within a sac called an ascus (plural, asci). (Web site)

Nuclei

  1. It lengthens to form an elongated tube-shaped or cylinder-shaped capsule, the actual ascus.
  2. This is almost always followed by a further mitotic division, so that the ascus ultimately has eight daughter nuclei.
  3. The ascus is unique to ascomycetes and distinguishes them from other kinds of fungi. (Web site)
  4. However, Neolecta lacks paraphyses, and the croziers do not develop until the ascus is formed.
  5. By this means the ascus cell is brought uppermost, and after the fusion of the two nuclei it develops enormously and produces the ascospores. (Web site)

Sexually

  1. A sexually produced fungal spore formed within an ascus. (Web site)
  2. Yeasts reproduce asexually by budding and sexually by forming a sac (or ascus). (Web site)
  3. Any of various members of a large group of fungi characterized by the presence of sexually produced spores formed within an ascus. (Web site)
  4. It also reproduces sexually by forming a sac-like structure, called an ascus, which contains four ascospores produced via meiosis. (Web site)

Diploid Zygote

  1. Nuclear fusion within an ascus will produce a diploid zygote.
  2. Within the ascus, two spores undergo plasmogamy and karyogamy, forming a diploid zygote, which exits the ascus and continues as a pseudohypha.

Ascospores

  1. These fungi form meiotic spores called ascospores, which are enclosed in a special sac-like structure called an ascus.
  2. Ascospores are a general category of spores that have been produced by means of sexual reproduction (in a sack-like structure called an ascus).
  3. Ascomycetes: A group of fungi that reproduce sexually by the endogenous formation of ascospores in an ascus. (Web site)
  4. Ascospores: spores produced by an ascus, characteristic of ascomycetes. (Web site)
  5. Ascus: a sac-like cell containing the ascospores cleaved from within by free cell formation after karyogamy (nuclear fusion) and meiosis.

Asci

  1. ASCUS (pl. = ASCI) - the meiosporangium of the Ascomycetes: originally evolved as a spore-gun in terrestrial environments. (Web site)
  2. Ascus (pl. asci): A saclike cell that gives rise to ascospore.
  3. The transmission electron micrograph (left - courtesy of A. Beckett) shows a section directly through an ascus tip of Xylaria. (Web site)
  4. Fig. 5: Ascospores are sexual spores borne in cylindrical cells called asci (sing.=ascus) belong in the division Ascomycota. (Web site)
  5. Dikaryotic hyphae within the ascocarp produces asci (singular: ascus), sacs that are walled off from the rest of the hyphae.

Wall

  1. UNITUNICATE - describes a type of ascus with only one distinct, functional wall layer (cf. (Web site)
  2. A prototunicate ascus is a thin-walled ascus that releases its spores by deliquescing, rather than by rupture.
  3. In the inoperculate ascomycetes, the tip of the ascus usually has a small pore which is stuffed with loose material similar to that of the ascus wall.
  4. Bitunicate: an ascus with differentiated inner and outer walls is said to be bitunicate.
  5. Asci are subglobose to globose with 8 ascospores; ascus walls readily dissolve to release ascospores. (Web site)

Meiospores

  1. The reference is to the structure (ascus) within which the sexual meiospores are formed.
  2. Ascospores are either meiospores or mitospores resulting from division of meiospores within the ascus.
  3. The ascus with its diploid, zygote nucleus begins to elongate, and the zygote nucleus undergoes meiosis. (Web site)

Hook

  1. CROZIER - in ascogenous hyphae, a terminal hook in which conjugate nuclear division takes place just prior to nuclear fusion, meiosis, and ascus formation. (Web site)
  2. The ascus forms from the penultimate cell of an ascogenous hypha where it forms a crozier hook.
  3. Karyogamy takes place in the young ascus soon after the septa are formed in the hook, thus ending the dikaryotic phase. (Web site)

Enclosed

  1. In ascomycota (sac fungi, see previous section), the ascospores were enclosed in an ascus.
  2. These fungi form meiotic spores called ascospores, which are enclosed in a special sac-like structure called an ascus.
  3. These fungi form meiotic spores called ascospore s, which are enclosed in a special sac-like structure called an ascus. (Web site)
  4. A bitunicate ascus is enclosed in a double wall. (Web site)

Forcibly

  1. In most discomycetes, each ascus contains eight sexual spores that are forcibly discharged into the air when mature. (Web site)
  2. Ascomycota: i, ascomata; j, ascus; k, ascospores; l, septate hypha.
  3. Ascospores are often forcibly ejected from the ascus and perithecium when mature.
  4. The structure of the ascus apex and the method of dehiscence have been used as basic characters in classifying discomycetes. (Web site)
  5. Euascomycetes - the filamentous ascomycetes; mycelium with a simple septal pore, an ascus vesicle, and forcibly discharged ascospores. (Web site)

Eight

  1. Compare the diagrams of a basidium with basidiospores above with that of an ascus with ascospores seen earlier.
  2. The life cycle of these fungi follows the typical ascomycete pattern and there are 8 ascospores per ascus. (Web site)
  3. Typically, a single ascus will contain eight ascospores. (Web site)
  4. The image above shows an ascus which contains ascospores.
  5. Magnified view of a cleistothecium and ascus containing ascospores. (Web site)

Ascomycete Fungi

  1. An ascus (plural asci) is the spore-bearing container produced in the ascocarps of ascomycete fungi. (Web site)
  2. An ascus (plural asci) is the sexual spore-bearing cell produced in ascomycete fungi. (Web site)
  3. Ascomycete Fungi whose sexual reproduction is by means of an ascus.
  4. Should know for the MCAT Ascospore An ascospore is the name for a spore contained in an ascus or that was produced inside an ascus of an ascomycete fungi. (Web site)

Nuclear Fusion

  1. Nuclear fusion followed by meiosis (and usually a mitosis) to produce 8 ascospores in an ascus.-- Distinctive gametangia and stages of ascospore formation. (Web site)
  2. An ascus (plural asci) is then formed, in which karyogamy (nuclear fusion) occurs. (Web site)
  3. It is within the ascus that nuclear fusion and meiosis take place.
  4. Nuclear fusion eventually takes place in the young ascus. (Web site)

Hand

  1. On the other hand, ascus fungi have brought some important benefits to humanity.
  2. On the other hand, ascus fungi have brought some important benefits to mankind.
  3. As indicated by Margulis and Schwartz (1999), the phylum Ascomycota is defined by a shared characteristic among this phylum known as the ascus.

Released

  1. At the time they are released from the ascus, the thick-walled haploid ascospores are resistant to adverse environments.
  2. Furthermore, the ascus had a prominent ocular chamber and released its ascospores through a broad, bivalvate slit.

Four

  1. This is achieved by the ascus generating four sex cells by the normal process of meiosis, and then each of those four cells splitting.
  2. There are four basic types of ascus. (Web site)
  3. The spores of Tuber are large; from one to four may be seen in a spore sac, or ascus.
  4. Ascospores are generally found in clusters of four or eight spores within a single mother cell, the ascus.

Spores

  1. Fungi in this group make their spores in sacs called asci (singular form is ascus). (Web site)
  2. Usually in these fungi, the spores then go through a round of mitosis and form 8 final ascospores in each ascus.
  3. Ascomycete Any of various fungi belonging to the phylum Ascomycota, characterized by the presence of sexually produced spores formed within an ascus.
  4. On the inside of the cup, each hypha terminates in an ascus, which produces eight spores.
  5. Within these ascus -like cysts, eight spores form which are released through rupture of the cyst wall.

Inside

  1. Thus the dissemination cells (the ascospores) develop, lying initially like peas in a pod inside the ascus.
  2. An ascospore is a spore contained in an ascus or that was produced inside an ascus. (Web site)
  3. Inside the perithecium the cells divide by meiosis and then mitosis to produce 8 spores inside a single ascus.

Contains Eight

  1. Each ascus usually contains eight (or a multiple of 8) ascospores, the result of one round of mitosis following meiosis.
  2. Each ascus contains eight ascospores, produced by a meiotic cell division followed by a mitotic cell division. (Web site)

Development

  1. Furthermore, the morphology and development of the sexual sporangium of the fission yeasts is similar to the ascus of other ascomycetes (4, 5). (Web site)
  2. Ascospores are bicellular but disarticulate at the septum early in development into 16 part-ascospores so that the ascus appears to contain 16 ascospores.

Unitunicate-Inoperculate Ascus

  1. Instead of an operculum, a unitunicate-inoperculate ascus has an elastic ring that functions like a pressure valve. (Web site)

Names Ascomycota

  1. The names Ascomycota, Ascomycetes, and others with the same root are based upon the term "ascus".

Unitunicate

  1. UNITUNICATE - describes a type of ascus with only one distinct, functional wall layer (cf.

Meiospore

  1. ASCOSPORE - meiospore produced in an ascus; usually 8 per ascus (though the number can also be 1, 2, 3, 4, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512.

Ascus Vesicle

  1. Euascomycetes - the filamentous ascomycetes; mycelium with a simple septal pore, an ascus vesicle, and forcibly discharged ascospores. (Web site)

Numerous Ascospores

  1. While the number of ascospores per ascus in usually 8, 1, 2, 4, 6, as well as numerous ascospores per ascus are also known.

Ascospore Development

  1. However, ascus and ascospore development are highly impaired by the Δ ste12 mutation. (Web site)

Ascus Development

  1. Ascus development starts with the formation of female gametangia called ascogonia. (Web site)

Ascus Types

  1. Ascus types are phylogenetically misleading in Trapeliaceae and Agyriaceae (Ostropomycetidae, Ascomycota). (Web site)

Single Ascus

  1. Typically, a single ascus will contain eight ascospores.

Meiosporangium

  1. ASCUS (pl. = ASCI) - the meiosporangium of the Ascomycetes: originally evolved as a spore-gun in terrestrial environments.

Saclike Cell

  1. In the Ascomycota, spores develop within a microscopic elongated, saclike cell called an ascus, which typically contains eight spores.
  2. The perfect state is characterized by the formation of a saclike cell (ascus) containing ascospores. (Web site)
  3. Ascus (pl. asci): A saclike cell that gives rise to ascospore.

Bitunicate Ascus

  1. The wall in both a unitunicate and a bitunicate ascus is said to consist of two layers: exotunica and endotunica. (Web site)
  2. The bitunicate ascus is so different from the unitunicate ascus that we assume they diverged a long time ago.

Earlier

  1. As noted earlier, Neolecta has a basic form of ascus.

Names

  1. Names followed by an asterisk are true-polyspored species with over 100 spores per ascus. (Web site)

Fig

  1. The wall of a unitunicate ascus has two layers that adhere closely together (Fig.
  2. FIG. 4. Ascus development in the wild type and a representative pro11 transformant (Tr) carrying plasmid pIG1808-23 and expressing the mouse striatin gene.

Presence

  1. C) by the presence of eight sexual spores in an ascus.
  2. The low positive predictive value of HPV testing with ASCUS smears suggests that HPV positivity could be not used for predicting the presence of CIN 2 to 3.

Orders

  1. Before we go on to explore the many orders of ascomycetes, we must take a closer look at the ascus itself.
  2. The orders are separated on the structure of the ascus and the manner of ascus opening. (Web site)

Products

  1. Ascomycetes, such as baker's yeast, are popular for genetics research because the ascospores they produce in each ascus are the products of meiosis.
  2. Because the products of meiosis are retained within the sac-like ascus, ascomycetes have been used for elucidating principles of genetics and heredity (e.g.

Production

  1. The ascus contains these spores and, by virtue of small diameter, holds them in order of their production by meiosis. (Web site)

Fluid

  1. Ascospores were discharged from asci along with droplets of fluid, the epiplasm, from within the ascus.
  2. As the spores grow, fluid pressure builds up in the ascus until the operculum bursts open and the ascospores are blown out into the environment.

Inner

  1. Bitunicate: an ascus with differentiated inner and outer walls is said to be bitunicate.

Categories

  1. Ascomycetes
  2. Ascospores
  3. Meiosis
  4. Spores
  5. Glossaries > Glossary of Fungus Stubs /

Related Keywords

    * Air * Ascocarp * Ascoma * Ascomata * Ascomycete * Ascomycetes * Ascomycota * Ascospore * Ascospore of Peziza * Basidia * Basidium * Bursts * Cell * Cells * Colposcopy * Daughter Nuclei * Defining Feature * Diagrams * Diploid Nucleus * Division * Elongate * Figure * Form * Formation * Fungi * Fusion * Haploid Ascospores * Haploid Spores * Hypha * Incorrect * Karyogamy * Lsil * Mature * Maturity * Meiosis * Meiotic Division * Mitosis * Mitotic Division * Number * Opening * Paraphyses * Perithecium * Pezizomycotina * Phylum * Phylum Ascomycota * Plural * Pod * Process * Result * Sac * Sac-Like Structure * Sacs * Septa * Several Characteristics * Sexual Spores * Singular * Species * Spore * Structure * Tip * Top * Yeast * Yeasts * Zygote
  1. Books about "Ascus" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Ascus"
  Originally created: May 27, 2008.
  Links checked: December 26, 2012.
  Please send us comments and questions by this Online Form
  Please click on Move Up to move good phrases up.
0.015 sec. a=1..