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Atopic Dermatitis       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Humans > Health > Diseases > Eczema > Atopic Dermatitis   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
PLACEBO
PRESENCE
STUDIES
TYPES
USEFUL
CONTROVERSIAL
SUBJECT
PRESENT
PROBLEM
ATOPIC KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS
DOMESTIC DOGS
MONTELUKAST
INTERFERON-ALPHA THERAPY
IRRITATED SKIN
DIAPER AREA
SPECIFIC SUBLINGUAL IMMUNOTHERAPY
IGE
ADULT ATOPIC DERMATITIS
CONTACT DERMATITIS
CANINE ATOPIC DERMATITIS
SEVERE ATOPIC DERMATITIS
ULCERATIVE COLITIS
GROUP
CHANGES
STRESS
LIFE
CASES
PREDISPOSITION
CURE
TRIALS
IMBALANCE
HEALTHY
SUPPLEMENTATION
OXIDATIVE STRESS
PERSON
CONTAGIOUS
AFFECTED
SEVERITY
SCRATCHING
ELBOWS
TRIAL
ROLE
ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS
AGE
INFANCY
CHILDHOOD
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Atopic Dermatitis"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic (long-lasting) disease that affects the skin.
  2. Atopic dermatitis is a very common, often chronic (long-lasting) skin disease that affects a large percentage of the world's population.
  3. Atopic dermatitis is a long-lasting (chronic) skin condition that causes intense itching and then a red, raised rash.
  4. Atopic dermatitis is the most common of the many types of eczema.
  5. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic skin disorder associated with biochemical abnormalities in the patient's body tissues and immune system.

Placebo

  1. Taken together, some of these studies show a slight benefit over placebo for the treatment of atopic dermatitis.
  2. The risk of atopic dermatitis in children on probiotics relative to placebo was 0.96 (confidence interval 0.38–2.33).

Presence

  1. However, alopecia areata occurring at a young age, prolonged alopecia, or the presence of eczema (atopic dermatitis) often predicts a poorer outcome.

Studies

  1. Recent studies provide hints that food allergy may trigger atopic dermatitis.

Types

  1. These features can also be found in people who do not have atopic dermatitis or who have other types of skin disorders.

Useful

  1. It can be very useful for treating localized itchy areas in atopic dermatitis.

Controversial

  1. Diet: Originally controversial, the association of food allergy with atopic dermatitis has now been clearly demonstrated.

Subject

  1. Both Seborrheic and Atopic dermatitis require individualized treatment; they are not the subject of this article.

Present

  1. It may be present in and of itself in skin conditions such as atopic dermatitis or dry skin eczema (winter itch).

Problem

  1. When children with atopic dermatitis grow older, this problem can improve or go away.

Atopic Keratoconjunctivitis

  1. The triggers for atopic keratoconjunctivitis appear to be similar to those of atopic dermatitis.

Domestic Dogs

  1. Many of the same types of treatment are used in domestic dogs with atopic dermatitis.

Montelukast

  1. Montelukast should not be prescribed in urticaria, conjunctivitis and atopic dermatitis.
  2. Initial reports concerning the use of montelukast in atopic dermatitis (AD) have been encouraging, although not consistent.

Interferon-Alpha Therapy

  1. Interferon-alpha therapy in atopic dermatitis.

Irritated Skin

  1. People with atopic dermatitis tend to have dry, itchy and easily irritated skin.

Diaper Area

  1. However, the irritated skin of atopic dermatitis and eczema primarily affects areas other than the diaper area.
  2. Other rashes that occur in the diaper area include Seborrheic dermatitis and Atopic dermatitis.

Specific Sublingual Immunotherapy

  1. Specific sublingual immunotherapy in atopic dermatitis.

Ige

  1. Allergen presentation by epidermal Langerhans cells from patients with atopic dermatitis is mediated by IgE. Immunology 1990;69:335.

Adult Atopic Dermatitis

  1. Efficacy of traditional Chinese herbal therapy in adult atopic dermatitis.

Contact Dermatitis

  1. Eczema is a term to describe specific skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, hand dermatitis and asteatotic eczema.

Canine Atopic Dermatitis

  1. Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is estimated to affect 15% to 30% of the canine population (2).
  2. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids on canine atopic dermatitis.

Severe Atopic Dermatitis

  1. PUVA can be an effective treatment for severe atopic dermatitis.
  2. Sustained benefit of interferon-alpha therapy and oral hyposensitization in severe atopic dermatitis.
  3. Paukkonen K, Fraki J, Horsmanheimo M. Interferon-alpha treatment decreases the number of blood eosinophils in patients with severe atopic dermatitis.

Ulcerative Colitis

  1. It is also used for treatment of ulcerative colitis, eczema particularly atopic dermatitis.

Group

  1. In this group were placed conditions such as essential hypertension, asthma, ulcerative colitis, peptic ulcer, atopic dermatitis, and rheumatoid arthritis.

Changes

  1. Another issue families face is the social and emotional stress associated with changes in appearance caused by atopic dermatitis.

Stress

  1. Stress, anger, and frustration can make atopic dermatitis worse, but they haven't been shown to cause it.

Life

  1. It is estimated that atopic dermatitis affects about 10 percent of children around the world and usually begins in the first year of life.

Cases

  1. Biofeedback treatment of atopic dermatitis: controlled case studies of eight cases.
  2. Canine atopic dermatitis is, in most cases, a life-long disease.

Predisposition

  1. It has previously been thought to be involved in the predisposition to psoriasis and other inflammatory disorders such as atopic dermatitis (AD) and asthma.

Cure

  1. The treatment of the Atopic Dermatitis is a lengthy process which may take months or even years to cure.
  2. As scientists learn more about atopic dermatitis and what causes it, they continue to move closer to effective treatments, and perhaps, ultimately, a cure.

Trials

  1. Initial open trials suggest that over 90% of children and adults rapidly achieve at least good improvement of atopic dermatitis.

Imbalance

  1. Researchers also think that an imbalance in the immune system may contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis.

Healthy

  1. People with atopic dermatitis can lead healthy, productive lives.

Supplementation

  1. Berth-Jones J, Graham-Brown RA. Placebo-controlled trial of essential fatty acid supplementation in atopic dermatitis.

Oxidative Stress

  1. Urinary biomarker of oxidative stress in patients with psoriasis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis.

Person

  1. The symptoms of Atopic dermatitis vary from person to person and from region to region.

Contagious

  1. Also, atopic dermatitis is not contagious; it cannot be passed from one person to another.
  2. Patches of atopic dermatitis may appear on various parts of the body, but the condition is not contagious.

Affected

  1. When a child has atopic dermatitis, the entire family may be affected.
  2. The presence of allergy in general and atopic dermatitis was not affected by presence of overt malabsorption or duration of undiagnosed disease.

Severity

  1. The severity and extent of psoriasis and atopic dermatitis was assessed by their area and severity index.

Scratching

  1. Behavioural treatment of scratching in patients with atopic dermatitis.

Elbows

  1. A common allergic reaction often affecting the face, elbows and knees is atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema.

Trial

  1. Effects of probiotics on atopic dermatitis: a randomised controlled trial.
  2. A controlled trial of traditional Chinese herbal medicine in Chinese patients with recalcitrant atopic dermatitis.
  3. Uehara M, Sugiura H, Sakurai K (2001). A trial of oolong tea in the management of recalcitrant atopic dermatitis.

Role

  1. Miraglia del Giudice M, De Luca MG. 2004 The role of probiotics in the clinical management of food allergy and atopic dermatitis.
  2. Genetics: Although atopic dermatitis runs in families, the role of genetics (inheritance) remains unclear.
  3. In one project, scientists are studying the role of the infectious bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in atopic dermatitis.

Environmental Factors

  1. Environmental factors can bring on symptoms of atopic dermatitis at any time in individuals who have inherited the atopic disease trait.

Age

  1. New-onset atopic dermatitis patients at a later age or severe atopic dermatitis often warrant referral to an allergist for food allergy testing.

Infancy

  1. No effects of probiotics on atopic dermatitis in infancy.

Childhood

  1. Although atopic dermatitis may occur at any age, it most often begins in infancy and childhood.
  2. Later in childhood, atopic dermatitis may affect the inner aspects of the elbows and knees.

Categories

  1. Humans > Health > Diseases > Eczema
  2. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis > Food Allergy
  3. Life > Organisms > Bacteria > Probiotics
  4. Humans > Health > Diseases > Asthma
  5. Placebo-Controlled Study

Related Keywords

    * Adulthood * Adults * Allergen * Allergens * Allergic * Allergies * Asthma * Atopic * Atopic Eczema * Babies * Children * Common * Common Form * Conjunctivitis * Dermatitis * Dietary Supplementation * Disease * Eczema * Effect * Efficacy * Eyelids * Food Allergies * Food Allergy * Gamma-Linolenic * Hay Fever * Infants * Irritants * Itching * Long-Term Management * Medications * Pathogenesis * Patients * People * Phototherapy * Pimecrolimus * Placebo-Controlled Study * Preventive Effect * Probiotics * Pruritus * Psoriasis * Randomized * Skin * Symptoms * Topical Treatment * Treatment * Type * Young Children
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  Originally created: August 12, 2008.
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