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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Asia > East Asia > Korea > Silla > Baekje   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
GAYA
ATTACK BAEKJE
BUYEO COUNTY
KING MURYEONG
MAHAN CONFEDERACY
GWANGGAETO
WIRYESEONG
NAMBUYEO
BAEKJE KINGDOM
CULTURE
ALLYING
RECORDS
ORDER
TRIBUTE
ART
DESCENDANTS
DESCENDANT
FLOWERING
SON
SUCCESSOR
EXPANSION
FOUNDING
FOUNDER
SOUTH KOREA
PEAK
SURRENDER
CONTROL
CENTRALIZED
NAME
ROYALTY
BATTLE
WEAPONRY
CENTURIES
LINGUISTS
PERIOD
REIGN
SONS
DESCENDENTS
FIRST
FALL
POWER
GENEROSITY
CHINESE CULTURE
PENINSULA
SOUTH
CHINESE
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Baekje"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Baekje (18 BCE – 660 CE) was a kingdom in the southwest of the Korean Peninsula.
  2. Baekje was a kingdom in southwest Korea and was influenced by southern Chinese dynasties, such as the Liang.
  3. Baekje (October 18 BC – August AD 660) was a kingdom in the southwest of the Korean Peninsula.
  4. Baekje was a monarchy, but like most monarchies a great deal of power was held by the aristocracy.
  5. Baekje was conquered by an alliance of Silla and Tang forces in 660.

Gaya

  1. These three confederacies eventually developed into Baekje, Silla, and Gaya.
  2. Silla first annexed Gaya, then conquered Baekje and Goguryeo with Tang assistance.
  3. Silla first annexed Gaya, then conquered Baekje, driving them south to a neighboring island.

Attack Baekje

  1. Once Su returned from the Sijie campaign, Emperor Gaozong commissioned him to head over the sea to attack Baekje, in conjunction with Silla.
  2. In 660, King Munmu of Silla ordered his armies to attack Baekje.

Buyeo County

  1. Buyeo County - Local government site, providing basic statistics and tourist information for this ancient Baekje capital.

King Muryeong

  1. According to the chronicles of Japan II (續日本紀), Emperor Kammu's mother was a decendant of King Muryeong of Baekje, Korea.

Mahan Confederacy

  1. The Sanguo Zhi mentions Baekje as a member of the Mahan confederacy in the Han River basin (near present-day Seoul).

Gwanggaeto

  1. In 392, with Gwanggaeto in personal command, Goguryeo attacked Baekje with 50,000 cavalry, taking 10 walled cities along the two countries' mutual border.

Wiryeseong

  1. Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, was founded in 18 BC, with its capital at Wiryeseong in the Seoul area.
  2. When the newly established kingdom of Baekje was established on 18 BC, they built their capital at Wiryeseong.
  3. Later in the fifth century, Baekje retreated under military threat from Goguryeo, and in 475, the Wiryeseong (present-day Seoul) region fell to Goguryeo.

Nambuyeo

  1. Jolbon Buyeo was the predecessor to Goguryeo, and in 538, Baekje renamed itself Nambuyeo (South Buyeo).

Baekje Kingdom

  1. Located in Buyeo County, the ancient capital of the Baekje Kingdom, this school opened in 2000.
  2. Buyeo County is home to the ancient capital of the Baekje Kingdom, which at its height ruled all the lands bordering the West Sea (or Yellow Sea).

Culture

  1. Prior to that, by 663, many people of Baekje had immigrated to Japan, bringing technologies and culture with them.

Allying

  1. Ara Gaya sought its independence by allying with Goguryeo, and asked Goguryeo to invade Baekje in 548.

Records

  1. The records of Baekje and Silla during the 1st century and 2nd century AD include numerous battles against the Mohe.

Order

  1. Thus, Baekje, Goguryeo, and Silla are listed an order that is the reverse of their traditional order of formation.
  2. However, Mohan claims that Goguryeo fabricated the Japanese invasion in order to justify its conquest of Baekje.

Tribute

  1. In the 27th year of King Geunchogo (372 A.D.), Baekje paid tribute to Dongjin located in the basin of Yangja river.

Art

  1. The beatific "Baekje smile" found on many Buddhist sculptures expresses the warmth typical of Baekje art.
  2. A splendid gilt-bronze incense burner () excavated from an ancient Buddhist temple site at Neungsan-ri, Buyeo County, exemplifies Baekje art.
  3. Historic evidence suggests that Japanese culture, art, and language was strongly influenced by the kingdom of Baekje and Korea itself.

Descendants

  1. Goguryeo and Baekje claimed that they were descendants of Fuyu.
  2. This severely weakened Silla and soon thereafter, descendants of the former Baekje established Later Baekje.

Descendant

  1. His concubine and mother of Emperor Kammu was Takano no Niigasa, who is said to be a descendant of King Muryeong of Baekje.

Flowering

  1. The Sabi Period witnessed the flowering of Baekje culture, alongside the development of Buddhism, which Baekje transmitted to Japan.

Son

  1. King Muryeong of Baekje was born in 462, and left a son in Japan who settled there.
  2. Tatara clan (多々良氏) - descended from Prince Rinshō, a son of King Seong of Baekje (disputed).

Successor

  1. Those titles suggest both Goguryeo and Baekje, two of the three kingdoms of ancient Korea, considered themselves as a branch or successor of Fuyu.

Expansion

  1. It effectively made Baekje the weakest player on the Korean peninsula and gave Silla an important, resource and population rich area as a base for expansion.

Founding

  1. She is remembered as a key figure in the founding of both Goguryeo and Baekje.

Founder

  1. King Onjo, the founder of Baekje, is said to have been a son of King Dongmyeongseong, founder of Goguryeo.

South Korea

  1. Buyeo County: A county in South Chungcheong Province, South Korea, and one-time capital of the ancient kingdom of Baekje.

Peak

  1. Baekje absorbed or conquered other Mahan chiefdoms and, at its peak in the 4th century, controlled most of the western Korean peninsula.
  2. Founded around modern day Seoul, the southwestern kingdom Baekje expanded far beyond Pyongyang during the peak of its powers in the 4th century.

Surrender

  1. He attacked Later Baekje in 934 in a show of strength and received the surrender of Silla in the following year.
  2. Su quickly captured the Baekje capital Sabi, forcing Baekje's King Uija and his crown prince Buyeo Yung to surrender.

Control

  1. However, the area under Baekje control soon contracted under pressure from Goguryeo and Silla.

Centralized

  1. To the west, Baekje had centralized into a kingdom by about 250, by overtaking the Mahan confederacy.
  2. To the west, Baekje had centralized into a kingdom by about 250, by overtaking the loose Mahan confederacy.

Name

  1. Wiryeseong was the name of two early capitals of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.
  2. Baekje officially changed its name to Nambuyeo (남부여, 南夫餘 "South Buyeo") in 538.

Royalty

  1. According to the Japanese chronicle Nihonshoki, members of Baekje royalty were held as hostages while Japan provided military support.

Battle

  1. For Baekje, the battle was the knockout blow that ended any hope of reviving the kingdom.
  2. In 663, Baekje revival forces and a Japanese naval fleet convened in southern Baekje to confront the Silla forces in the Battle of Baekgang.
  3. At the battle of Hwangsanbeol in 660, the Baekje Army was defeated by Silla-Tang joint forces and lost over 40 counties.

Weaponry

  1. Gaya exported abundant quantities of iron armor and weaponry to Baekje and the kingdom of Wa in Yamato period Japan.

Centuries

  1. The boundaries of Baekje control shifted substantially through the centuries.

Linguists

  1. Some linguists propose the so-called " Fuyu languages " that included the languages of Fuyu, Goguryeo, and the upper class of Baekje, and Old Japanese.

Period

  1. The religion was officially introduced at the year 538 by King Seong of Baekje, and this year is traditionally set for the epoch of the new period.
  2. Throughout this early period of Baekje, the capital was frequently moved from one point to another for strategic reasons.

Reign

  1. During the reign of King Goi (234–286), Baekje became a full-fledged kingdom, as it continued consolidating the Mahan confederacy.
  2. It was during the reign of Emperor Wu of Liang that Baekje relocated its capital to southern Korea.
  3. The establishment of a centralized state in Baekje is usually traced to the reign of King Geunchogo.

Sons

  1. Buyeo Pung was one of the sons of King Uija of Baekje.
  2. Two sons of Goguryeo's founder are recorded to have fled a succession conflict, to establish Baekje around the present Seoul area.

Descendents

  1. This however, severely weakened Silla and soon thereafter, descendents of the former Baekje established Later Baekje.

First

  1. The establishment of a centralized state in Baekje is usually traced to the reign of King Goi, who may have first established patrilineal succession.

Fall

  1. The fall of Baekje and the retreat to Japan Some members of the Baekje nobility and royalty emigrated to Japan even before the kingdom was overthrown.
  2. In 538, long after the fall of Buyeo, Baekje renamed itself Nambuyeo (South Buyeo).

Power

  1. In the 1st and 2nd centuries AD, with the transition to iron culture, the focus of power shifted from Mokji to Baekje in the Han River region.

Generosity

  1. The defeated nobility of Goguryeo and Baekje were treated with some generosity.

Chinese Culture

  1. Baekje acquired Chinese culture and technology through contacts with the Southern Dynasties during the expansion of its territory.
  2. Baekje continued substantial trade with Goguryeo, and actively adopted Chinese culture and technology.

Peninsula

  1. This period began circa 57 BCE to 668 CE. Three Korean kingdoms, Goguryeo, Baekje, and Silla vied for control over the peninsula.

South

  1. Baekje and Silla were prominent in the south, Goguryeo in the north.
  2. As civil war continued among feudal lords over royal succession, in 551, Baekje and Silla allied to attack Goguryeo from the south.
  3. Further, while Baekje had agreed to attack Goguryeo from the south, it never actually did so.

Chinese

  1. Baekje amassed power while Goguryeo was fighting against the Chinese, and came into conflict with Goguryeo in the late fourth century.
  2. The Tang Dynasty's intention of conquering Silla as well was made clear and Silla attacked the Chinese in Baekje and northern Korea in 671.

Categories

  1. Asia > East Asia > Korea > Silla
  2. Goguryeo
  3. Korean Peninsula
  4. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Society > Culture > Three Kingdoms
  5. Places > World > Countries > Japan

Subcategories

Sabi
Wiryeseong

    Related Keywords

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