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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Science > Physics > Radiation > X-Rays > Barium   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
PURE FORM
HELP
DIFFERENT POSITIONS
RADIOGRAPH
RADIOGRAPHER
DIAGNOSIS
ESOPHAGEAL MANOMETRY
WATER
INSOLUBLE
LARGE BOWEL
CECUM
AIR ENEMA
RECTALLY
SIR HUMPHRY DAVY
COMPLICATIONS
PERFORATION
DOCTOR
TECHNOLOGIST
LINING
PATIENT DRINKS
VACUUM TUBES
VISIBLE
X-RAY FILMS
CHALKY
LARGE INTESTINE
LARGE INTESTINES
COATS
THICK LIQUID
VARIOUS CHARACTERISTICS
GI TRACT
TV MONITOR
FLUOROSCOPE
CALCIUM
STRONTIUM
SMALL INTESTINE
BARIUM X-RAY
BARIUM MEALS
BARIUM MEAL
CONTRAST MATERIAL
FLUOROSCOPY
CONTRAST MEDIUM
X-RAY PICTURES
ENEMA TUBE
BARIUM SOLUTION
ANUS
CHALKY LIQUID
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Barium"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Barium is a metallic, chemical, chalky, liquid used to coat the inside of organs so that they will show up on an x-ray.
  2. Barium is a white, chalky substance that makes the colon, or large intestine, visible on an x-ray.
  3. Barium is a silver-white metallic compound that outlines the colon and rectum on an x-ray and helps show abnormalities.
  4. Barium is a chalky solution that the patient drinks or is given through the rectum and into the intestine (enema).
  5. Barium is a dye that coats the stomach and intestine so that they can be seen better on the x-ray.

Pure Form

  1. Because barium quickly becomes oxidized in air, it is difficult to obtain this metal in its pure form.
  2. The pure form must be derived through electrolysis of barium chloride.

Help

  1. A small balloon on the enema tip may be inflated to help you hold in the barium.
  2. You may be given laxatives to help pass barium, which can cause constipation.
  3. Air may also be injected through the tube to help the barium thoroughly coat the lining of the colon.

Different Positions

  1. The patient is asked to swallow the Barium a number of times, whilst standing in different positions, i.e.
  2. The table is tilted at different positions and you may change positions to help spread the barium.
  3. You may be asked to lie in a number of different positions to help the flow of the barium liquid, and to get it to spread evenly along the wall of the colon.

Radiograph

  1. A barium swallow radiograph uses x rays to help spot abnormalities such as a hiatal hernia and severe inflammation of the esophagus.
  2. Upper endoscopy is more accurate than a barium swallow radiograph and may be performed in a hospital or a doctor's office.
  3. A barium swallow radiograph (x-ray) is useful for identifying structural abnormalities and erosive esophagitis.

Radiographer

  1. After the barium has been administered, the radiographer will take a series of x-rays of your large intestine.
  2. After you have expelled the barium, the radiographer may take another x-ray image to determine whether any barium remains.
  3. Once the films are complete, the radiographer will show you to the toilet facilities so you can expel the barium.

Diagnosis

  1. Ultrasound of the abdomen and an air or barium enema are used to confirm a diagnosis of intussusception.
  2. Diagnosis of polyps can sometimes be accomplished with a barium enema, but most often the physician will perform a colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy.
  3. When colon cancer is suspected, either a lower GI series (barium enema x-ray) or colonoscopy is performed to confirm the diagnosis and to localize the tumor.

Esophageal Manometry

  1. Diagnosis is reached with esophageal manometry and barium swallow radiographic studies.
  2. Useful investigations may include ambulatory Esophageal pH Monitoring, barium swallow X-rays, esophageal manometry, and Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD).
  3. The diagnosis is based on history of the disease, radiography (barium esophagogram), and esophageal motility testing (esophageal manometry).

Water

  1. After the test, drink plenty of water to help avoid constipation and to help flush the barium out of the colon.
  2. Patients may eat as normal after the procedure but it is important to drink a lot of water to allow the barium to pass through the body easier.
  3. Then you have an enema of barium and water - it is squirted into your back passage (rectum) through a small plastic tube.

Insoluble

  1. Barium sulfate (or barium sulphate) is a white crystalline solid with the formula BaSO 4. It is very insoluble in water and other potential solvents.
  2. The barium carbonate is insoluble in water and precipitates out to cover the suspended inert material.
  3. All hydroxides are insoluble EXCEPT those of ammonium, barium and alkali metal (Group I) cations.

Large Bowel

  1. A barium enema is an x-ray test to obtain pictures of your colon (the last part of the gut, sometimes called the large intestine or large bowel).
  2. A barium enema is a test that uses X-rays to examine the large bowel (colon and rectum).
  3. A barium enema is a procedure to examine your colon (large intestine or large bowel).

Cecum

  1. Passage of the barium is followed fluoroscopically through the entire large intestine and into the cecum and lowest part of the small intestine.
  2. The barium makes the colon visible so the position of the cecum can be determined.

Air Enema

  1. Air enema is preferred over water-soluble contrast or barium enema.

Rectally

  1. An air enema, given rectally in a similar way as barium, can also be used to diagnosis and treat an intussusception.
  2. The barium is administered by mouth or rectally and x-rays are obtained in order to determine if the small intestine or colon are abnormal.
  3. Barium (as BaSO 4) may be given orally or rectally for evaluation of the GI tract.

Sir Humphry Davy

  1. Barium (Greek "barys" meaning "heavy") was first identified in 1774 by Carl Scheele and extracted in 1808 by Sir Humphry Davy in England.
  2. Barium metal was first isolated in 1808 by Sir Humphry Davy by electrolysis.

Complications

  1. Complications from barium enema, colonoscopy, or sigmoidoscopy include damage to or puncture of the colon.
  2. When performed by an experienced radiologist, the barium enema examination carries no increased risk, and we have seen no complications from this procedure.
  3. CT is superior to barium enema in depicting early and subtle changes of diverticulitis, as well as complications.

Perforation

  1. Endoscopy and barium swallow are contraindicated if perforation is suspected.
  2. Perforation during attempted intussusception reduction in children - a comparison of perforation with barium and air.
  3. The risks of barium enema includes discomfort, radiation exposure, and perforation of the colon.

Doctor

  1. After the barium is placed into your colon, your doctor will add air, to improve the view on the x-ray and help with detection of abnormal growths.
  2. The barium outlines the colon and rectum on the x-rays to help the doctor see tumors or other abnormal tissue.
  3. The doctor uses this test to check for signs of CD. Barium Enema: The doctor injects fluid containing a substance called barium into the rectum.

Technologist

  1. As the procedure continues, the technologist or the radiologist may ask you to drink more barium.
  2. The technologist inserts a rectal tube, so the barium can flow into the colon.
  3. However, you will be instructed to hold the barium inside until the technologist has completed the examination.

Lining

  1. They're often taken after you swallow a liquid (barium) that coats the lining of your digestive tract, making it show up more clearly on the X-rays.
  2. This procedure uses barium and air to outline the lining of the rectum and colon.
  3. A barium enema is a rectal injection of barium given to coat the lining of the colon and rectum.

Patient Drinks

  1. The patient drinks a chalky liquid called barium to make these organs and any ulcers show up more clearly on the x ray.
  2. The patient drinks a chalky liquid called barium to make these organs and any ulcers show up more clearly on the x-ray.
  3. The patient drinks a liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound).

Vacuum Tubes

  1. Both barium and strontium oxides are used to coat the filaments of vacuum tubes, which are still used in some applications.
  2. Metallic barium has few industrial uses, but has been historically used to scavenge air in vacuum tubes.

Visible

  1. Because these internal organs are normally not visible on x-rays, barium is inserted by enema into the rectum and colon to enhance visibility.
  2. A solution containing a dye (barium) that is visible on x-rays was swallowed by the patient (upper GI series).
  3. Because these organs are normally not visible on x-rays, you need to swallow barium, a liquid that does show up on x-rays.

X-Ray Films

  1. X-ray films will be taken at specific times as the barium travels through the small bowel until it reaches the large bowel or colon.
  2. The result is a thin layer of barium over the inner lining of the colon which is visible on X-ray films.
  3. A barium enema is a series of X-ray films that shows the colon after a contrast agent is inserted in the rectum.

Chalky

  1. A fluid called barium (a metallic, chemical, chalky, liquid used to coat the inside of organs so that they will show up on an x-ray) is swallowed.
  2. This procedure involves filling the colon with barium, a chalky white solution.
  3. Barium enema x-ray: The colon is filled with barium, a chalky white solution to facilitate a detailed view of the colon.

Large Intestine

  1. It involves being given barium (a dye) as an enema, which coats the lining of your large intestine and rectum.
  2. After the instillation of barium into the rectum, the radiologist may also fill the large intestine with air.
  3. Barium enema, an X-ray examination of the large intestine (colon and rectum) or small intestine.

Large Intestines

  1. Enough barium is given to fill up the colon (large intestines).
  2. The barium outlines the large intestines on the x-rays.
  3. Imaging data is obtained every 15 to 20 minutes, or as requested by the radiologist, until the barium reaches the junction of the small and large intestines.

Coats

  1. Barium coats the inside lining of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum and makes them show up more clearly on x-rays.
  2. The barium coats the lining of the colon and rectum and makes these organs, and any signs of disease in them, show up more clearly on x-rays.
  3. Barium coats the inside lining of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, and makes them show up more clearly on x rays.

Thick Liquid

  1. After fasting for 12 hours, you will drink a thick liquid called barium, which coats the inside of the stomach, making it show up on the x ray.
  2. Barium is a thick liquid that makes the bowel show up better on the x ray.
  3. Barium is a thick liquid that makes the bowel show up better on the x-ray.

Various Characteristics

  1. The use of barium with standard x-rays contributes to the visibility of various characteristics of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum.
  2. The use of barium with x-rays contributes to the visibility of various characteristics of the pharynx and esophagus.
  3. The use of barium with standard x-rays contributes to the visibility of various characteristics of the large intestine.

Gi Tract

  1. The use of barium with standard x-rays contributes to the visibility of various characteristics of the GI tract.
  2. Barium appears white on the images, and when it fills the organs of the GI tract, it makes them visible.
  3. X-rays are taken at different times as the barium travels through the upper GI tract and small bowel.

Tv Monitor

  1. The flow of the barium is monitored by the health care provider on an X-ray fluoroscope screen (like a TV monitor).
  2. The doctor then monitors the flow of the barium on a fluoroscope screen, which is pretty much like a regular TV monitor.
  3. The flow of the barium sulfate is monitored by the health care provider on an X-ray fluoroscope screen (like a TV monitor).

Fluoroscope

  1. The radiologist will also use a fluoroscope, an x-ray device on which the colon can be seen while the barium is flowing into the patient.
  2. The radiologist will monitor the flow of the barium with a fluoroscope, which will show immediate images on its screen.
  3. Using a machine called a fluoroscope, the radiologist is also able to watch your digestive system work as the barium moves through it.

Calcium

  1. Davy, by analogy with calcium named "barium" after baryta, with the "-ium" ending signifying a metallic element.

Strontium

  1. This is commonly happens to barium, calcium, strontium, sodium and potassium.
  2. Compounds of strontium are not as extensively used as those of calcium or barium.
  3. In order of increasing atomic number, they are Beryllium, Magnesium, Calcium, Strontium, Barium, and Radium.

Small Intestine

  1. Your doctor watches the movement of the barium through your esophagus, stomach, and the first part of the small intestine (duodenum) on a video screen.
  2. The passage of the barium through the esophagus, stomach, and small intestine is monitored on the fluoroscope.
  3. An upper gastrointestinal series or barium swallow provides a set of X-rays showing the esophagus, stomach, and small intestine.

Barium X-Ray

  1. Diagnosis is by barium enema, barium x-ray of the small bowel, and colonoscopy.
  2. Diagnosis is made with barium x-ray or endoscopy.
  3. Diagnosis of esophageal cancer can be made by barium x-ray of the esophagus, and confirmed by endoscopy with biopsy of the cancer tissue.

Barium Meals

  1. Barium sulfate is used as a radiocontrast agent for X-ray imaging of the digestive system (" barium meals " and " barium enemas ").
  2. Barium meals are useful in the diagnosis of structural and motility abnormalities of the foregut.
  3. In some barium meals, the drink is fizzy because it contains ingredients that cause gas.

Barium Meal

  1. Ileal stasis (small intestine) can be diagnosed if no trace of barium has reached the cecum 6 hours after a barium meal.
  2. The barium meal (or barium swallow) and barium enema are tests to help doctors examine the digestive system.
  3. If you have had one of the higher-dose X-ray tests (for example a CT scan or a barium meal or enema) it may be worth discussing the risks with your doctor.

Contrast Material

  1. Recently had an X-ray test using barium contrast material, such as a barium enema or upper gastrointestinal series (barium swallow).
  2. Before the test, you drink a mix of barium (barium contrast material) and water.
  3. The test uses barium contrast material, fluoroscopy, and X-ray.

Fluoroscopy

  1. The radiologist watches the barium pass through your gastrointestinal tract using fluoroscopy and X-ray pictures.
  2. The lower GI uses a special form of x-ray called fluoroscopy and a contrast material called barium or a water soluble iodinated contrast.
  3. The doctor then tracks the progress of the barium through the esophagus, stomach, and small intestine using fluoroscopy, a type of X ray.

Contrast Medium

  1. The barium, a radiopaque (shows up on X-ray) contrast medium, is then allowed to flow into the colon.
  2. The barium sulfate, a radiopaque (shows up on X-ray) contrast medium, is then allowed to flow into the colon.
  3. This is often done with the addition of contrast medium (barium) to permit better examination of the surface of the bowel.

X-Ray Pictures

  1. The X-ray pictures are taken after the patient drinks a solution that coats and outlines the walls of the esophagus (also called a barium swallow).
  2. Barium is radiopaque and can outline the colon on x-ray pictures.
  3. After many x-ray pictures are taken, you will be given a bedpan or taken to a bathroom and asked to expel as much of the barium as possible.

Enema Tube

  1. A small balloon at the tip of the enema tube may be inflated to help keep the barium inside your colon.
  2. The barium, a radio opaque (shows up on X-ray) contrast medium, is then allowed to flow into the colon through the enema tube.
  3. A small balloon at the tip of the enema tube may be inflated to help keep the barium sulfate inside.

Barium Solution

  1. This procedure involves taking x-rays of the rectum and colon after you are given an enema with a barium solution, followed by an injection of air.
  2. A barium swallow is a procedure where you are given some barium solution to drink.
  3. The x-rays are taken after the patient is given an enema with a barium solution and air is introduced into the colon.

Anus

  1. Before you have the x ray, the doctor will put barium into your large intestine through the anus—the opening where stool leaves the body.
  2. To make the intestine visible on an X ray, the colon is filled with barium, which is poured through a tube inserted into the anus.
  3. Before taking the x-ray, the doctor will put barium into your bowel through the anus.

Chalky Liquid

  1. Because the colon does not show up well on x-rays, the doctor fills it with barium, a chalky liquid that makes the area visible.
  2. Because the colon does not show up well on x rays, the doctor fills it with barium, a chalky liquid that makes the area visible.
  3. A fluid called barium (a metallic, chemical, chalky liquid used to coat the inside of organs so that they will show up on an x-ray) is swallowed.

Categories

  1. Science > Physics > Radiation > X-Rays
  2. Humans > Medicine > Drugs > Enema
  3. Colon
  4. Rectum
  5. Bowel

Related Keywords

    * Air * Barium Carbonate * Barium Chloride * Barium Compounds * Barium Enema * Barium Enemas * Barium Enema Test * Barium Liquid * Barium Nitrate * Barium Oxide * Barium Sulfate * Barium X-Rays * Bowel * Bowels * Chlorate * Colon * Colonoscopy * Compounds * Drink * Drink Barium * Enema * Enemas * Esophagus * Exam * Examination * Fireworks * Intestine * Intestines * Liquid * Liquid Barium * Nitrate * Patient * Polyps * Procedure * Radiologist * Rectum * Sulfate * Test * Tests * X-Ray * X-Rays * X-Ray Film * X-Ray Images
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  Originally created: May 07, 2008.
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