KeyWEn.com  
 
 
 
Buddy Bolden       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Bolden > Buddy Bolden   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
LEADER
THOUGHT
CENTURY
FACTS
TRUE STORY
MARCHING BANDS
LOUIS ARMSTRONG
CORNETIST
MUSIC
JELLY ROLL MORTON
FREDDIE KEPPARD
FIRST
MUSICIANS
BAND
DIZZY GILLESPIE
CORNET
PLACE
POSTERITY
JAZZ
BOLDEN
BUDDY BOLDEN
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Buddy Bolden"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Buddy Bolden, a cornetist who played the blues, became the first jazz soloist.
  2. Buddy Bolden, a cornetist from New Orleans, never recorded his influential take on jazz. (Web site)
  3. Buddy Bolden is generally considered to be the first bandleader to play the improvised music which became known as Jazz.
  4. Buddy Bolden was said to be the first to have the blues played by a band and for dancing.
  5. Buddy Bolden is presented as the first personality in jazz - others are left out. (Web site)

Leader

  1. The leader of the first great orchestra, Buddy Bolden, was already in his teens before the Congo dances were discontinued. (Web site)

Thought

  1. I thought I heard Buddy Bolden say, Funky-butt, funky-butt, take it away. (Web site)

Century

  1. Jimmy Johnson (c.1876-c.1937?) played string bass with the legendary Buddy Bolden at the turn of the century. (Web site)

Facts

  1. While there is substantial first hand oral history about Buddy Bolden, facts about his life continue to be lost amongst colourful myth.

True Story

  1. This is not, however the true story of Buddy Bolden. (Web site)

Marching Bands

  1. Of course, I knew the clichés: that jazz originated in New Orleans with Creole funerals, marching bands, and the hot trumpet of Buddy Bolden. (Web site)

Louis Armstrong

  1. You had to go back to Louis Armstrong and Buddy Bolden for a pair of trumpeters like these. (Web site)

Cornetist

  1. Men like cornetist Buddy Bolden played jazz in the red-light district of New Orleans just before the turn of the century. (Web site)

Music

  1. The nascent New Orleans jazz style is exemplified by the music of cornetist Buddy Bolden, whose work was never recorded.

Jelly Roll Morton

  1. Buddy Bolden, Louis Armstrong, and Jelly Roll Morton began their careers in New Orleans and became some of the greatest soloists of the time. (Web site)

Freddie Keppard

  1. Freddie Keppard was an important musician who succeeded Buddy Bolden as "king" of the cornet players in New Orleans.

First

  1. The cornet player, Buddy Bolden is generally considered to be the first real Jazz musician. (Web site)

Musicians

  1. Hence some musicians who played with black bands like those of Buddy Bolden and Joe "King" Oliver also played with Laine. (Web site)

Band

  1. He sometimes played in the band of perhaps the most important force in the musical change, Buddy Bolden. (Web site)
  2. The cornetist Buddy Bolden led a band often mentioned as one of the prime movers of the style later to be called "jazz". (Web site)
  3. The first improvising jazz musician was the cornetist Buddy Bolden, leader of a band in New Orleans. (Web site)

Dizzy Gillespie

  1. Davis was in a line of jazz trumpeters that started with Buddy Bolden and ran through Joe "King" Oliver, Louis Armstrong, Roy Eldridge, and Dizzy Gillespie. (Web site)
  2. The fundamental musical concepts used by every great jazz musician from Buddy Bolden to Dizzy Gillespie.
  3. It covers the styles of musicians from Buddy Bolden to Dizzy Gillespie. (Web site)

Cornet

  1. Nicholas was quite familiar with Buddy Bolden, although he did not switch to cornet until he played with King Oliver in 1915. (Web site)

Place

  1. After playing with the Olympia Orchestra he joined Frankie Dusen 's Eagle Band, taking the place recently vacated by Buddy Bolden.
  2. He took Freddie Keppard 's place in the Eagle Band (a place earlier held by Buddy Bolden) when Keppard left town.

Posterity

  1. A musician named Buddy Bolden appears to have led some bands that influenced early jazz musicians, but this music and its sound have been lost to posterity. (Web site)

Jazz

  1. Buddy Bolden, often considered the father of jazz, but his playing is unrecorded. (Web site)
  2. Describes the music of the pioneer jazz trumpeter, and summarizes "The Loudest Trumpet - Buddy Bolden and the Early History of Jazz" by Daniel Hardie.
  3. Alabama: I've read that Armstrong was influenced by Buddy Bolden, the New Orleans cornettist often credited with "inventing" jazz.

Bolden

  1. No recordings remain of Bolden, but his song "Buddy Bolden Blues" has been recorded by many other musicians. (Web site)

Buddy Bolden

  1. Buddy Bolden organizes the first band to play the instrumental Blues (the fore-runner of Jazz). (Web site)
  2. Many musicians and writers (none of whom had ever seen Bolden or heard him play) described Buddy Bolden as a black Baptist from Uptown New Orleans. (Web site)
  3. Several musicians with clear memories of Buddy Bolden said that Freddie Keppard sounded the most like Bolden of anyone who recorded. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Bolden
  2. Improvised Music
  3. Orleans
  4. Arts > Music > Composers > Jelly Roll Morton
  5. Posterity
  6. Books about "Buddy Bolden" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Buddy Bolden"
  Originally created: March 23, 2007.
  Links checked: March 31, 2013.
  Please send us comments and questions by this Online Form
  Please click on Move Up to move good phrases up.
0.0205 sec. a=1..