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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Events > Earthquakes > Plate Tectonics > Continental Crust > Buoyant   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
LIGHTER-THAN-AIR
FREE CONVECTION
POSITIVELY BUOYANT
BUOYANT LIFT
DOING
ADDITION
RESTING
HELIUM
RACING
DEPTH
LIGHT
DIAMETER
CAUSING
FEELING
LIQUID
HYDROGEN
SURFACE
DENSITY
WEIGHTS
RISE
WEIGHT
WEIGHTED
HORSE RACING
ASTHENOSPHERE
DENSE
FIRST TYPE
MOIST AIR
SCUBA DIVERS
SCUBA DIVER
VOLUME
DRY AIR
CONTINENTAL CRUST
BCD
MATERIAL
MASS
AIR
CONVECTION
WATER
UNDERWATER
MAGMA
PLATES
SUBDUCTION
CONTINENTS
CONTINENT
ASCENT
FLOAT
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Buoyant"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. To remain buoyant, the hull of a vessel must prevent water entering the large air spaces of the vessel (known as downflooding).

Lighter-Than-Air

  1. An airship is a buoyant ("lighter-than-air") aircraft that can be steered and propelled through the air. (Web site)

Free Convection

  1. The basic premise behind free convection is that heated matter becomes more buoyant and "rises"; while cooler material "sinks". (Web site)

Positively Buoyant

  1. The typical buoyancy compensator is positively buoyant without any air, and becomes more so as it is inflated.

Buoyant Lift

  1. Whatever you do, she must be positively buoyant in the water for the controlled buoyant lift (CBL), which you should now carry out.

Doing

  1. Because basalt melt is very buoyant, it can readily escape upwards from the region of melting and, in doing, it can encounter much cooler environments.

Addition

  1. In addition the silicic continental crust is relatively buoyant and is not normally subducted back into the mantle.

Resting

  1. Be buoyant for surface swimming and resting. (Web site)

Helium

  1. In hydrogen atom and helium atom, the buoyant force is the only force that keeps the electron (electrons in helium) from falling into the nucleus.

Racing

  1. The new battle cry is: "Acquire or die!" However, in doing so Barrick will be racing against a buoyant gold price. (Web site)

Depth

  1. Unless compression of the exposure suit is adequately compensated for by BC or dry suit inflation, a diver may become very negatively buoyant at depth.

Light

  1. Since its fruit is light and buoyant the plant is readily spread by marine currents which can carry coconuts significant distances. (Web site)

Diameter

  1. The pelagic eggs are buoyant, measuring 1.6-1.8mm in diameter.

Causing

  1. The sub was neutrally buoyant at the start, but when the first frogman airlocked, the sub's buoyancy changed causing the sub to start floating up. (Web site)

Feeling

  1. America's chief executives are feeling a little less buoyant about the business climate in the months ahead. (Web site)

Liquid

  1. A bubble is not an empty space: it contains smaller trapped particles, but its small mass, relative to that of the liquid it disperses, makes it buoyant. (Web site)

Hydrogen

  1. While hydrogen gas is approximately 7% more buoyant, helium has the advantage of being non-flammable (in addition to being fire retardant). (Web site)

Surface

  1. If the diver is positively buoyant, there is an increased risk of a fast ascent to the surface.
  2. The instructor brought the trainee to the surface using a controlled buoyant lift.
  3. Because I was negatively buoyant, I had to struggle to ascend the two or three feet to the surface, and then hastily rip the full face mask off. (Web site)

Density

  1. One involves the energy equation while the other incorporates the buoyant force due to the difference in density between the boundary layer and bulk fluid. (Web site)

Weights

  1. Weight Belt - A buckled belt worn around a diver's waist which holds weights used to make the diver less buoyant.

Rise

  1. If the eruption column is buoyant it will rise to tens of km into the atmosphere during violent eruptions. (Web site)
  2. These overheated portions of the mantle near the core-mantle boundary become buoyant relative to their surroundings, and begin to rise via diapirism.

Weight

  1. The "weight" meant here is the external force (not counting the buoyant force) required to support the body in equilibrium in the liquid.

Weighted

  1. Astronauts and other subjects were then weighted and their equipment was made neutrally buoyant by the addition of light foam pads. (Web site)
  2. Suited astronauts are weighted in the water by support divers so that they experience no buoyant force and no rotational moment about their center of mass. (Web site)

Horse Racing

  1. Horse racing, however, is not quite so buoyant - the sport remains without a Triple Crown champion since 1978.

Asthenosphere

  1. The density curves show that Archean SCLM is significantly buoyant relative to the asthenosphere at depths greater than about 60 km.

Dense

  1. They become less dense and more buoyant, and so rise. (Web site)

First Type

  1. However, the first type, being both more buoyant and thicker, always sits with its upper surface higher than the upper surface of the second type. (Web site)

Moist Air

  1. Warm, moist air becomes buoyant and rises, moving energy from the surface high into the atmosphere. (Web site)

Scuba Divers

  1. The controlled buoyant lift is an underwater diver rescue technique used by scuba divers to safely raise an incapacitated diver to the surface from depth. (Web site)

Scuba Diver

  1. While ascending, the scuba diver should spend time being neutrally buoyant at certain levels on the way up.

Volume

  1. When a volume of fluid is heated, it expands and becomes less dense, and thus more buoyant than the surrounding fluid.
  2. All surface ships, as well as surfaced submarines, are in a positively buoyant condition, weighing less than the volume of water they displace. (Web site)

Dry Air

  1. Also, a volume of moist air will rise or be buoyant if placed in a larger region of dry air. (Web site)

Continental Crust

  1. The continental crust is about 150 kilometers (93 miles) thick with a low-density crust and upper-mantle that are permanently buoyant. (Web site)

Bcd

  1. I was so buoyant that in addition to my weights (which worked fine on other dives), my instructor had to stuff sand in the pockets of my BCD to keep me down.

Material

  1. Buoyant material from a hot spot rises through the upper mantle, bringing heat from the Earth's interior closer to the surface. (Web site)
  2. As heat is transferred across this boundary by conduction, material in the D" layer becomes hotter and thus more buoyant.
  3. When it becomes sufficiently buoyant, material begins to rise from the D" layer to form a mantle plume.

Mass

  1. Mantle plume A buoyant mass of hot mantle material that rises to the base of the lithosphere. (Web site)
  2. Their leaves and roots are long and thin and almost hair-like; this helps spread the mass of the plant over a wide area, making it more buoyant.
  3. Historically, the conservation of mass and weight was obscure for millennia because of the buoyant effect of the Earth's atmosphere on the weight of gases. (Web site)

Air

  1. Air in direct contact with the sun-warmed ground becomes warm and buoyant. (Web site)
  2. Much ash falls immediately to the ground but often part of it heats the air around it, making it buoyant.
  3. Because hydrogen is buoyant in air, hydrogen flames tend to ascend rapidly and cause less damage than hydrocarbon fires. (Web site)

Convection

  1. One example is that of buoyant convection when water is heated in a pot on a stove.
  2. Buoyant convection is because of the effects of gravity, and hence does not occur in microgravity environments.
  3. Convection: Motion in a fluid or plastic material due to some parts being buoyant because of their higher temperature. (Web site)

Water

  1. Astronauts wear extravehicular mobility units, or spacesuits, in the water and are made neutrally buoyant to neither rise nor fall in the tank. (Web site)
  2. The bell is ballasted so as to remain upright in the water and to be negatively buoyant so that it sinks even when completely full of air.
  3. The fact that a lot of whale species are negatively buoyant (they sink in the water) means that they have to keep moving while resting. (Web site)

Underwater

  1. When an object underwater rises, it's positively buoyant.

Magma

  1. This creates a gap (rift valley), allowing for warm, buoyant magma to rise to the surface and cool. (Web site)
  2. It is buoyant when hot because these minerals melt easily to form basalt which can then rise through the upper layers as magma. (Web site)
  3. This molten material, known as magma, is basaltic in composition and is buoyant.

Plates

  1. When two huge masses of continental lithosphere meet head-on, neither one can sink because both plates are too buoyant. (Web site)

Subduction

  1. The continental lithosphere is far less dense than the asthenosphere and will be buoyant on it, and therefore, will not undergo subduction.
  2. When buoyant continental crust enters a trench, subduction eventually stops and the convergent plate margin becomes a collision zone. (Web site)

Continents

  1. These plates carry both continents and sea floor, but unlike the sea floor, the less-dense, buoyant continents resist subduction into the mantle. (Web site)

Continent

  1. At first, the hot, faulted edge of the continent was high and buoyant relative to the new ocean basin. (Web site)

Ascent

  1. Buoyant Ascent - An ascent made using some form of positive buoyancy.
  2. This ascent is complicated by the casualty's lack of gas to become buoyant at the start of the ascent and at the surface. (Web site)

Float

  1. The higher salinity makes the water more buoyant and thus it is easier for a baby whale to float. (Web site)
  2. The continents (Silicate rocks) are less dense and more buoyant (float better) than the basaltic rocks.
  3. Scuba divers like to be neutrally buoyant so they neither sink nor float. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Events > Earthquakes > Plate Tectonics > Continental Crust
  2. Sports > Diving > Divers > Diver
  3. Places > Earth > Geology > Lithosphere
  4. Dry Air
  5. Subducted

Related Keywords

    * Crust * Denser * Diver * Divers * Lithosphere * Mantle * Subducted
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  Short phrases about "Buoyant"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Links checked: April 09, 2013.
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