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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Fuca Plate > Cascadia Subduction Zone   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
LAST
SCIENTISTS
ESTIMATED
ZONE
HAZARDOUS
DIVERGENT BOUNDARY
PLATES
SUBDUCTION
YEARS
GOLDFINGER
VOLCANOES
SOUTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA
MAGNITUDE
MEGATHRUST EARTHQUAKE
PACIFIC NORTHWEST
EARTHQUAKE
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
SAN ANDREAS FAULT
NORTH AMERICAN PLATE
SUBDUCTION ZONES
SUBDUCTION ZONE
JUAN
FUCA PLATE
CASCADIA SUBDUCTION ZONE
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Cascadia Subduction Zone"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. The Cascadia subduction zone is where the oceanic Juan de Fuca, Gorda and Explorer Plates are being subducted under the continental North American plate.
  2. The Cascadia subduction zone is a region that has repeatedly ruptured in great thrust earthquakes of moment magnitude (Mw) greater than 8.
  3. The Cascadia subduction zone is a subduction zone, a type of convergent plate boundary that stretches from northern Vancouver Island to northern California.
  4. The Cascadia Subduction Zone is a very long sloping fault that stretches from mid-Vancouver Island to Northern California.
  5. The Cascadia Subduction Zone is a giant fault running off the coast of the Pacific Northwest.

Last

  1. The last major earthquake at the Cascadia subduction zone was the magnitude nine Cascadia Earthquake. (Web site)
  2. HOW OFTEN ARE CASCADIA SUBDUCTION ZONE QUAKES? The last known great earthquake in the northwest was in January, 1700, just over 300 years ago. (Web site)

Scientists

  1. Scientists now believe Cascadia subduction zone quakes have occurred every 250 to 800 years in the past. (Web site)

Estimated

  1. The last megathrust earthquake at the Cascadia subduction zone was the 1700 Cascadia earthquake, estimated to have a moment magnitude of 8.7 to 9.2.
  2. The last megathrust earthquake along the Cascadia subduction zone, estimated at 9.2, was in January 1700.
  3. The last mega-thrust earthquake along the Cascadia subduction zone, estimated at 9.2, was in January 1700.

Zone

  1. Thermal constraints on the zone of major thrust earthquake failure: The Cascadia subduction zone. (Web site)

Hazardous

  1. Recent findings concluded the Cascadia subduction zone was more hazardous than previously suggested.

Divergent Boundary

  1. The San Andreas connects a divergent boundary in the Gulf of California with the Cascadia subduction zone. (Web site)

Plates

  1. The boundary between the plates, the Cascadia Subduction Zone, lies just off the coast of Oregon and Washington.
  2. Scientists believe that the two plates are partially locked together along a contact known as the Cascadia subduction zone.

Subduction

  1. The arc has formed due to subduction along the Cascadia subduction zone. (Web site)

Years

  1. Scientists have estimated that there have been at least 13 significant earthquakes along the Cascadia subduction zone in the past 6,000 years. (Web site)
  2. Recent studies indicate that the Cascadia subduction zone has produced an average of one large quake every 500 years during the past 3,000 years. (Web site)

Goldfinger

  1. Goldfinger has used the technique to recreate the seismic history of the Cascadia Subduction Zone over the past 10,000 years. (Web site)
  2. The question, Goldfinger says, is not whether or not the Cascadia Subduction Zone will break again.

Volcanoes

  1. Sitting in the middle of this vast array of volcanoes which lines the West Coast of America up to Alaska, is the Cascadia Subduction Zone.

Southern British Columbia

  1. The Chilcotin Plateau Basalts in southern British Columbia is thought to have formed as a result of back-arc extension behind the Cascadia subduction zone.
  2. The Chilcotin Group in southern British Columbia is thought to have formed as a result of back-arc extension behind the Cascadia subduction zone. (Web site)

Magnitude

  1. Because of the very large fault area, the Cascadia subduction zone can produce large earthquakes of magnitude 7.0 or greater.

Megathrust Earthquake

  1. The 1700 Cascadia Earthquake was a magnitude 8.7 - 9.2 megathrust earthquake that occurred in the Cascadia subduction zone in 1700.

Pacific Northwest

  1. A future rupture of the Cascadia Subduction Zone would cause widespread destruction throughout the Pacific Northwest.
  2. The boundary between these plates, called the Cascadia Subduction Zone, dips eastward beneath the Pacific Northwest at an offshore trench. (Web site)

Earthquake

  1. The last major earthquake at the Cascadia subduction zone was the 1700 Cascadia earthquake, estimated to have a magnitude of 8.7 to 9.2. (Web site)
  2. The last major earthquake at the Cascadia subduction zone was the 1700 Cascadia earthquake, estimated to have a moment magnitude of 8.7 to 9.2.
  3. Prediction of the next major earthquake Recent findings concluded the Cascadia subduction zone was more hazardous than previously suggested.

Northern California

  1. The Cascadia subduction zone off the coasts of Washington, Oregon and northern California has forearc basins in several areas, Fuller said. (Web site)
  2. This boundary is called the Cascadia Subduction Zone, and extends from the middle of Vancouver Island in British Columbia down to Northern California.
  3. The Cascadia subduction zone is a very long sloping fault that stretches from northern Vancouver Island to northern California.

San Andreas Fault

  1. It runs westward from a triple junction with the San Andreas Fault and the Cascadia subduction zone to the southern end of the Gorda Ridge. (Web site)

North American Plate

  1. To the north lies the Cascadia subduction zone, where the Gorda Plate is being subducted under the margin of the North American plate. (Web site)
  2. The oceanic Juan de Fuca plate is diving — or subducting — below the North American plate in an area known as the Cascadia subduction zone. (Web site)

Subduction Zones

  1. This would make the Cascadia subduction zone unlike most other subduction zones around the world.

Subduction Zone

  1. Keywords: tsunami, Cascadia subduction zone, paleoseismology, plate boundaries, subduction zone. (Web site)
  2. Between these is the Cascadia subduction zone, the last portion of a subduction zone that once stretched from Central America to Alaska.

Juan

  1. The Gorda, Juan de Fuca, and Explorer plates are being pulled down into the Cascadia subduction zone and beneath the North America plate.
  2. It formed by subduction of the Gorda and Juan de Fuca plates at the Cascadia subduction zone. (Web site)
  3. In this region, the Juan de Fuca oceanic plate is underthrusting the North American continent at the Cascadia subduction zone (Figure 1). (Web site)

Fuca Plate

  1. Further east, the Juan de Fuca plate is converging with and subducting beneath the North American plate, creating the Cascadia Subduction Zone. (Web site)
  2. The Cascadia subduction zone is where the oceanic Juan de Fuca plate is being subducted under the continental North American plate.
  3. Western Washington lies over the Cascadia subduction zone, where the Juan de Fuca Plate is subducting towards the east (see diagram, right).

Cascadia Subduction Zone

  1. PMID 11313500. ^ Rogers G, Dragert H (2003). "Episodic tremor and slip on the Cascadia subduction zone: the chatter of silent slip".
  2. Subduction of an oceanic plate The Juan de Fuca plate sinks below the North America plate at the Cascadia subduction zone. (Web site)
  3. The Cascadia subduction zone can produce very large earthquakes, magnitude 9.0 or greater, if rupture occurred over its whole area.

Categories

  1. Fuca Plate
  2. Subduction Zone
  3. Chatter
  4. Earth > Geology > Tectonics > North American Plate
  5. Northern California
  6. Books about "Cascadia Subduction Zone" in Amazon.com

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  Short phrases about "Cascadia Subduction Zone"
  Originally created: March 24, 2008.
  Links checked: January 26, 2013.
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