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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Chemical Energy > Chemical Bonds   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
CHEMICAL FUELS
CERTAIN CHEMICAL BONDS
ASYMMETRIC DISTRIBUTION
COMPOUND
ELEMENTS
FORMATION
DISCUSSION
BROKEN
FILLINGS
BREAKAGE
RESULT
DNA STRAND
ELECTRON CAPTURE
HYDROGEN BONDS
INFRARED RADIATION
COMPOUNDS
CHEMICAL REACTIONS
PHOTOSYNTHESIS
SURFACE
DANGLING BONDS
CRYSTALLINE STRUCTURES
FORM MOLECULES
MOLECULE
DIFFERENT ATOMS
ENERGY ASSOCIATED
FORM
CHEMICAL
CHEMISTRY
REARRANGEMENT
ENERGY
BONDS
BREAK
BREAKING
ELECTRONS
COVALENT BONDS
MOLECULES
ATOMS
CHEMICAL BONDS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Chemical Bonds"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Chemical bonds are the attractive forces that hold atoms together in the form of compounds. (Web site)
  2. These chemical bonds are intramolecular forces, which hold atoms together in molecules. (Web site)
  3. When the chemical bonds are broken, either by combustion or other chemical reactions, the stored chemical energy is released in the form of heat or light.
  4. For chemical bonds, the mass changes are quite small and are negligible. (Web site)
  5. Formation of chemical bonds is thought to due to rearrangement of electron clouds. (Web site)

Chemical Fuels

  1. As discussed in the introduction, chemical bonds are one of the best means to store energy because of the high energy density of chemical fuels.

Certain Chemical Bonds

  1. Certain chemical bonds will generate light energy when the molecules are torn apart by mechanical crushing.

Asymmetric Distribution

  1. Partial charges are created due to the asymmetric distribution of electrons in chemical bonds.

Compound

  1. This quantity is decisively important in order to explain the arrangement of certain chemical bonds in the atoms of a compound.

Elements

  1. In chemical bonds, elements, or their atoms, are not only joined in whole numbers, but their mass ratios also remain constant.
  2. Due to its electronegativity, oxygen forms chemical bonds with almost all other elements at elevated temperatures to give corresponding oxides.

Formation

  1. Ions are critical to the formation of some kinds of chemical bonds, but the chemical role of the electron is not limited to ionic bonds. (Web site)

Discussion

  1. In molecular formulas the chemical bonds (binding orbitals) between atoms are indicated by various different methods according to the type of discussion. (Web site)

Broken

  1. During this reaction, chemical bonds between atoms are broken and new chemical bonds formed. (Web site)

Fillings

  1. These types of fillings don't have any chemical bonds that help them stay on the tooth.

Breakage

  1. A mineral's ability to resist breakage depends on the strength of chemical bonds between the atoms in its crystal structure.

Result

  1. Hardness is primarily the result of the strength of the chemical bonds between the gem's constituent atoms (how tightly they are bound to one another).

Dna Strand

  1. In fact, it is chemical bonds between the phosphates and the sugars that link one nucleotide to the next in the DNA strand.

Electron Capture

  1. Chemical bonds can affect the rate of electron capture to a small degree (generally less than 1%) depending on the proximity of electrons to the nucleus.

Hydrogen Bonds

  1. The structure is maintained by chemical bonds such as covalent, electrostatic charges and hydrogen bonds.

Infrared Radiation

  1. For example, red light resembles infrared radiation in that it can resonate some chemical bonds. (Web site)
  2. Infrared radiation is produced by hot objects; absorption of infrared radiation causes chemical bonds to vibrate. (Web site)

Compounds

  1. The fungus then "burns" these compounds to release the energy stored in their chemical bonds as well as to provide structural building blocks.

Chemical Reactions

  1. Chemical reactions usually involve the making or breaking of chemical bonds. (Web site)

Photosynthesis

  1. The solar energy that drives photosynthesis is stored in the chemical bonds of the biomass.

Surface

  1. Surface energy quantifies the disruption of chemical bonds that occurs when a surface is created.

Dangling Bonds

  1. A semiconductor surface is where chemical bonds are broken and dangling bonds are created. (Web site)

Crystalline Structures

  1. Crystalline structures occur in all classes of materials, with all types of chemical bonds. (Web site)

Form Molecules

  1. The study of how chemical bonds are formed by orbital electrons to form molecules is discussed in quantum chemistry. (Web site)
  2. Opposite charges attract, and the interaction between electrons and protons of separate atoms creates the chemical bonds that form molecules. (Web site)

Molecule

  1. Chemical energy the internal energy associated with the chemical bonds in a molecule. (Web site)
  2. Molecular geometry refers to the spatial arrangement of atoms in a molecule and the chemical bonds that hold the atoms together.

Different Atoms

  1. The smallest unit of a compound; consists of two or more different atoms in a specific ratio and configuration, held together with chemical bonds.

Energy Associated

  1. When electrons are locked into chemical bonds, there is a certain amount of energy associated with those electrons. (Web site)

Form

  1. In addition, with four valence electrons, carbon is ideally suited to finding other elements (or other carbon atoms) with which to form chemical bonds. (Web site)
  2. If it were either weaker or stronger, no chemical bonds would form, so no life could exist. (Web site)

Chemical

  1. The sequence of steps in which the reorganization of chemical bonds may be taking place in the course of a chemical reaction is called its mechanism. (Web site)

Chemistry

  1. In chemistry, valence, also known as valency or valency number, is a measure of the number of chemical bonds formed by the atoms of a given element.

Rearrangement

  1. During this reaction, there is a rearrangement of atoms that makes or breaks chemical bonds.

Energy

  1. Energy is often stored by cells in the form of chemical bonds in carbohydrate molecules, including sugars.
  2. If we don't use the energy released from the chemical bonds in a resource, the energy goes into waste heat, sound, thermal vibrations, or light.
  3. The starting material of cellular respiration is the sugar glucose, which has energy stored in its chemical bonds.

Bonds

  1. In theory, all bonds can be explained by quantum theory, but in practice, chemical bonds are divided in several categories.

Break

  1. The absorption of photons can even break chemical bonds, as in the photodissociation of chlorine; this is the subject of photochemistry. (Web site)
  2. Energy is needed to break chemical bonds in the starting substances. (Web site)
  3. Nucleases are enzymes that break the chemical bonds, called phosphodiester bonds, that hold the nucleotides of DNA or RNA polymers together. (Web site)

Breaking

  1. Chemical energy a form of potential energy related to the breaking and forming of chemical bonds. (Web site)
  2. A chemical reaction involves either the bonding of one atom with another or the breaking of chemical bonds between atoms. (Web site)
  3. The breaking of these chemical bonds in the Krebs Cycle provides the energy needed for muscular contraction. (Web site)

Electrons

  1. These forces constrain electrons to occupy orbitals around nuclei, which give rise to chemical bonds and thus allow stiff objects such as rocks to exist. (Web site)
  2. Those electrons tend to be bound tightly to nuclei in chemical bonds. (Web site)
  3. There are many types of chemical bonds, but all involve electrons which are either shared or transferred between the bonded atoms.

Covalent Bonds

  1. A molecule is composed of one or more chemical bonds (covalent bonds) between molecular orbital 's of different atoms. (Web site)

Molecules

  1. Chemical energy, stored in the chemical bonds of molecules. (Web site)
  2. Molecules The electrons of two or more atoms can link together to form chemical bonds that make molecules from the chemical elements.
  3. Strong chemical bonds are the intramolecular forces which hold atoms together in molecules.

Atoms

  1. Students know chemical bonds between atoms in molecules such as H 2, CH 4, NH 3, H 2 CCH 2, N 2, Cl 2, and many large biological molecules are covalent. (Web site)
  2. Molecules, in turn, are composed of atoms joined by chemical bonds that are more difficult to break.
  3. When two distinct elements are chemically combined, with the atoms held together by chemical bonds, the result is termed a compound. (Web site)

Chemical Bonds

  1. Molecular physics is the study of the physical properties of molecules and of the chemical bonds between atoms that bind them. (Web site)
  2. Chemical Bonding and Molecular structure: Chemical bonds and Lewis structure shapes of molecules (VSEPR theory).
  3. A molecular assembler I spoke about is a device capable of breaking and creating the chemical bonds between atoms and molecules.

Categories

  1. Chemical Energy
  2. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nature > Matter > Atoms
  3. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nature > Chemistry > Molecules
  4. Covalent Bonds
  5. Breaking
  6. Books about "Chemical Bonds" in Amazon.com

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  Short phrases about "Chemical Bonds"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Links checked: June 02, 2013.
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