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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Information > Science > Theories > Utilitarianism > Consequentialism   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
CONSEQUENCES
SATISFICING CONSEQUENTIALISM
KANT
VIRTUE ETHICS
MORAL THEORIES
UTILITARIANISM
DEONTOLOGY
DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS
AFFAIRS
ARGUE
WELFARIST
SATISFICING
ACTION
OBJECTION
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Consequentialism"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Consequentialism: An action is morally right if the consequences of that action are more favorable than unfavorable. (Web site)
  2. The term "consequentialism" was coined by G.E.M. Anscombe in her essay " Modern Moral Philosophy " in 1958. (Web site)
  3. Consequentialism is a modern form of this theory. (Web site)
  4. Consequentialism: Any position in ethics which claims that the rightness or wrongness of actions depends on their consequences.

Consequences

  1. Similarly, one might adopt an aesthetic consequentialism, in which the ultimate aim is to produce beauty. (Web site)
  2. Finally, following Foot's lead, one might adopt a sort of consequentialism which argues that virtuous activity ultimately produces the best consequences. (Web site)
  3. Someone who adopts direct consequentialism about everything is a global direct consequentialist (Pettit and Smith 2000). (Web site)
  4. Thus, utilitarians focus on the consequences of an act rather than on its intrinsic nature or the motives of the agent ( see consequentialism). (Web site)
  5. As its name indicates, Consequentialism holds that the consequences of an action determine whether or not that act is good or bad. (Web site)

Satisficing Consequentialism

  1. Satisficing consequentialism says that to be permissible its consequences have to be good enough. (Web site)
  2. This paper presents a new objection to Satisficing Consequentialism. (Web site)

Kant

  1. In contrast to consequentialism, Immanuel Kant argued that moral principles were simply products of reason.
  2. Three Methods, reflecting recent tastes, considers Kant, consequentialism, and virtue ethics.
  3. Standard interpretations see Kant as rejecting all forms of consequentialism, and defending a theory which is fundamentally duty-based and agent-centered.

Virtue Ethics

  1. Consequentialism can also be contrasted with aretaic moral theories such as virtue ethics. (Web site)
  2. However, consequentialism and virtue ethics need not be understood to be entirely antagonistic. (Web site)
  3. Whereas deontology and consequentialism are based on rules that try to give us the right action, virtue ethics makes central use of the concept of character. (Web site)
  4. The paper explains and discusses Deontological ethics, consequentialism, including comments about Mill and Bentham, and virtue ethics. (Web site)

Moral Theories

  1. Consequentialism is often contrasted with deontological moral theories. (Web site)
  2. In moral theory, he has written on moral dilemmas, consequentialism, and moral epistemology, where he defends limited moral skepticism.
  3. Consequentialist moral theories that focus on actual or objectively probable consequences are often described as objective consequentialism (Railton 1984). (Web site)
  4. Consequentialism can also be contrasted with aretaic moral theories such as virtue ethics.
  5. William Gass argues that moral theories such as consequentialism are unable to adequately explain why a morally wrong action is morally wrong. (Web site)

Utilitarianism

  1. Kant's moral theory is sometimes held up as a paradigm of deontology, and contrasted with the consequentialism of, for example, Utilitarianism.
  2. More broadly, utilitarian theories are examples of Consequentialism.
  3. As a result, there now exist many different accounts of the good, and therefore many different types of consequentialism besides utilitarianism. (Web site)
  4. Other contemporary forms of utilitarianism mirror the forms of consequentialism outlined below. (Web site)
  5. However, even consequentialism is strained when considering duty.

Deontology

  1. One possible question in the debate between consequentialism and deontological ethics is whether deontology might in fact be a type of consequentialism.
  2. Deontology is a set of moral theories which place themselves opposite consequentialism. (Web site)
  3. See Teleological ethics, consequentialism, utilitarianism and deontology. (Web site)
  4. Williams noted that rigid forms of both consequentialism and deontology demanded that people behave impartially.
  5. The next section examines claims virtue ethicists initially made that set the theory up as a rival to deontology and consequentialism. (Web site)

Deontological Ethics

  1. There are at least three ways to do this, deontological ethics, consequentialism, and virtue ethics. (Web site)
  2. This conclusion is rejected by consequentialists ( see consequentialism) and deontologists ( see deontological ethics) alike. (Web site)
  3. Consequentialism is often contrasted with deontological ethics. (Web site)

Affairs

  1. Agent-neutral consequentialism ignores the specific value a state of affairs has for any particular agent. (Web site)
  2. Agent-neutral consequentialism ignores the specific value a state of affairs has for any particular agent. (Web site)
  3. Positive consequentialism demands that we bring about good states of affairs, whereas negative consequentialism may only require that we avoid bad ones. (Web site)

Argue

  1. William Gass argues that moral theories such as consequentialism are unable to adequately explain why a morally wrong action is morally wrong.
  2. This narrower definition is motivated by the fact that many self-styled critics of consequentialism argue against agent-neutrality. (Web site)
  3. Maximizing act consequentialism fails to recognize, I shall argue, that the ends do not always justify the means.
  4. Consequentialism, I argue, can only cover things that belong to a combination of things that agents can bring about.
  5. I argue that this version of consequentialism is false.

Welfarist

  1. For this reason, utilitarianism is often associated with the term welfarist consequentialism. (Web site)
  2. When such pluralist versions of consequentialism are not welfarist, some philosophers would not call them utilitarian. (Web site)
  3. Scanlon versus welfarist consequentialism.
  4. A notable achievement of T.M. Scanlon's What We Owe to Each Other (1) is its sustained critique of welfarist consequentialism.

Satisficing

  1. It is argued that Satisficing Consequentialism is not an acceptable alternative to Maximising Consequentialism.
  2. For example, Thomas Nagel holds that consequentialism fails to appropriately take into account the people affected by a particular action.
  3. This position is often described as satisficing consequentialism (Slote 1984). (Web site)
  4. Utilitarianism is a form of consequentialism, which advocates that those actions are right which bring about the most good overall. (Web site)
  5. Both satisficing and progressive consequentialism allow us to devote some of our time and money to personal projects that do not maximize overall good. (Web site)

Action

  1. Consequentialism maintains that the morality of an action is determined solely by its consequences. (Web site)
  2. It is thus a form of consequentialism, meaning that the moral worth of an action is determined by its outcome. (Web site)
  3. As its name indicates, Consequentialism holds that the consequences of an action determine whether or not that act is good or bad. (Web site)
  4. Action guidance One important characteristic of many normative moral theories such as consequentialism is the ability to produce practical moral judgements.
  5. So called consequentialism states that the moral value of an action is determined by its consequences. (Web site)

Objection

  1. The second main objection to maximizing act consequentialism is that it mistakenly holds that morality requires us to maximize value.
  2. In this way what the nearest and dearest objection brings out is that big 'C' consequentialism is simply incredible. (Web site)
  3. So, challenge to hedonism is not really an objection to utilitarianism in general (or to consequentialism, in general).
  4. Contractualism, as a view distinct from deontology and consequentialism, also seems to fall to this objection, since it too is an ethics-by-authority. (Web site)
  5. A familiar objection to restrictive consequentialism is that a restrictive consequentialist is incapable of having true friendships. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Information > Science > Theories > Utilitarianism
  2. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Society > Ethics
  3. Glossaries > Glossary of Ethics /

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  Short phrases about "Consequentialism"
  Originally created: October 25, 2007.
  Links checked: March 22, 2013.
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