KeyWEn.com  
 
 
 
Convicts       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Earth > Continents > Australia > First Fleet > Convicts   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
CONVICT SYSTEM
LATTER
WOMEN
BUILDING
MEMBERS
CENTRAL
INHABITANTS
GOVERNMENT
TICKET
MAIN ISLAND
PAPAL STATES
HENDERSON
SETTLEMENT
CRIMEAN WAR
COLONIAL PERIOD
PREVENIENT GRACE
SMALL SETTLEMENT
VICTORIA
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
PENAL COLONY
SYDNEY
PRISON
ISLAND
SETTLERS
SUPERINTENDENT
TIME
FOUCAULT
COLONISTS
TRANSPORTATION
TASMANIA
AUSTRALIA
SOUTH WALES
FIRST FLEET
CONVICTS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Convicts"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. More convicts were sent, and the island was seen as a farm, supplying Sydney with grain and vegetables during its early years of near-starvation.

Convict System

  1. An emancipist was any of the convicts sentenced and transported under the convict system to Australia, who had been given conditional or absolute pardons.

Latter

  1. The jury illogically acquits on the former count but convicts on the latter, yet under the Court’s precedent the jury verdict is allowed to stand.

Women

  1. When the last shipment of convicts disembarked in Western Australia in 1868, the total number of transported convicts stood at around 162,000 men and women.

Building

  1. Earlier, convicts have to live in same building with separate cells for male and female prisoners.

Members

  1. Other immigrants were convicts or members of noble houses from Indonesia who were exiled to Sri Lanka and who never left.

Central

  1. Most of the convicts or undertrials come from poor families of central and north Gujarat region.

Inhabitants

  1. While the convicts remained below deck, the officers explored the city and were entertained by its inhabitants.

Government

  1. The Government rarely convicts or punishes those responsible for torture, and a climate of impunity allows such police abuses to continue.
  2. The government also maintained smaller prisons for local convicts in Buganda, Bunyoro, Toro, and Ankole.

Ticket

  1. Western Australia was, however, later to accept ticket of leave convicts between 1851 and 1869 due to the chronic shortage of labour it faced.

Main Island

  1. The main island of Tarutao used to be a jail for convicts but now tourists can walk along trails to beaches and cliffs.

Papal States

  1. That morning, 6000 Jesuits were marching like convicts to the coast, where they were deported, first to the Papal States, and ultimately to Corsica.

Henderson

  1. Henderson secured lodging for the convicts, then began construction of the Convict Establishment, later known as Fremantle Prison.

Settlement

  1. At the beginning of the 19 th century Jews were among the convicts sent to Siberia for settlement or hard labor.

Crimean War

  1. George Newman was captured in the Crimean War and then marched under a loose guard with a motley crew of PoWs, convicts, etc., to Voronezh.

Colonial Period

  1. In the early colonial period, Irish was seen as an opposition language used by convicts and repressed by the colonial authorities.

Prevenient Grace

  1. Prevenient Grace is that grace that convicts an individual of his or her own sinfulness and of the need to be reconciled to God.

Small Settlement

  1. The small settlement of Perth, founded in 1829 on the Swan River in Western Australia, failed to prosper and actually asked for convicts.

Victoria

  1. Apart from the early attempts at settlement, the only convicts sent directly to Victoria from Britain were about 1,750 convicts known as the 'Exiles'.

South Australia

  1. Only South Australia and the Northern Territory had never accepted convicts directly from England but they still accepted ex-convicts from the other states.
  2. The settlement of South Australia, again without convicts, followed in 1836.

Western Australia

  1. Victoria and Western Australia were also founded "free", but later accepted transported convicts.
  2. Western Australia was also founded "free", but later accepted transported convicts due to an acute labour shortage.
  3. He petitioned Britain to send convicts to Western Australia for labor.

Penal Colony

  1. When Western Australia became a penal colony in 1850, Henderson was appointed the colony's first Comptroller-General of Convicts.
  2. As Western Australia was not yet a penal colony, contemporary documents scrupulously avoided referring to the Parkhurst apprentices as "convicts".

Sydney

  1. The impending starvation at Sydney led to a great transplantation of convicts and marines to Norfolk Island in March 1790 on HMS Sirius.

Prison

  1. Most convicts in Western Australia spent very little time in prison.

Island

  1. The inhabitants of the island are descendants of former convicts who were exiled to the island and who have mixed themselves with the Bugis from Sulawesi.

Settlers

  1. During the 1850s, Britain sent some 10,000 convicts to aid the settlers, most of whom had migrated from E Australia.
  2. The settlement was abandoned by the Dutch during the Java War (1825-1830), but the former convicts remained as settlers.

Superintendent

  1. His father was Andrew Hamilton Hume, who came to Australia in 1790 as a superintendent of convicts and soon afterwards became a free settler.
  2. Thomas Dixon held the position of Superintendent of Convicts for nine years, running Fremantle Prison and the convict system.

Time

  1. On 7 March 1908, Gandhi wrote in the Indian Opinion of his time in a South African prison: "Kaffirs are as a rule uncivilised - the convicts even more so.
  2. This is a list of convict ship voyages that transported convicts to Western Australia during its time as a penal colony between 1850 and 1868.
  3. In the Australia of her time, convicts sent from England, Scotland, and Ireland were a common part of society.

Foucault

  1. Foucault then inquires how such a change in French society's punishment of convicts could have developed in such a short time.

Colonists

  1. They were to serve the religious needs of the convicts and the colonists, many of whom were Irish and Catholic.

Transportation

  1. The transportation of convicts to the colony of New South Wales ceased in 1848 after a campaign by the settlers.
  2. Transportation to New South Wales ended in 1840, by which time some 150,000 convicts had been sent to the colonies.
  3. Transportation of convicts to New South Wales (NSW) was finally abolished in 1840 and shortly afterwards, in 1842, Sydney was declared a city.

Tasmania

  1. The book also describes the life of some of these convicts in New South Wales and Tasmania.
  2. In the 50 years from 1803-1853 around 75,000 convicts were transported to Tasmania.

Australia

  1. They were not really emigrants at all, but convicts, four men and two women, who arrived with the First Fleet at Botany Bay, Australia, in 1788.
  2. In South Australia, unlike most of Australia, convicts were not admitted as settlers.
  3. An article about convicts and the British colonies in Australia.

South Wales

  1. From 1788 to 1823, the Colony of New South Wales was officially a penal colony comprised mainly of convicts, marines and the wives of the marines.
  2. Following the end of transportation to New South Wales, convicts were still sent to Van Diemens Land and Norfolk Island for another 13 years.
  3. New South Wales abolished transportation of convicts in 1840, by which time 150,000 convicts had been sent to Australia.

First Fleet

  1. The First Fleet was the fleet of sailing ships that brought the original settlers and convicts to Australia from England.
  2. The First Fleet is the name given to the first group of eleven ships that carried convicts from England to Australia in 1788.
  3. In 1788 the First Fleet landed at Camp Cove in Port Jackson with the 'cargo' of convicts which helped establish the penal colony of New South Wales.

Convicts

  1. This site gives information about the background to transportation of convicts, the voyage to Australia, the first year and ships of the First Fleet.
  2. A prison ship, historically sometimes called a prison hulk, is a vessel used as a prison, often to hold convicts awaiting transportation to penal colonies.
  3. He was one of only 37 such convicts from the 9721 convicts transported to the colony to overcome the social stigma of convictism to become schoolteachers.

Categories

  1. Earth > Continents > Australia > First Fleet
  2. World > Countries > States > Western Australia
  3. Countries > United Kingdom > Wales > South Wales
  4. Information > Science > Industry > Transportation
  5. World > Countries > States > South Australia
  6. Books about "Convicts" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Convicts"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Please send us comments and questions by this Online Form
  Please click on Move Up to move good phrases up.
0.0171 sec. a=1..