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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Society > Humans > Spinal Cord > Cord   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
BRANCH
NERVOUS
DISORDER
SEGMENT
SEGMENTS
CAVITY
MEMBRANE
VERTEBRAL COLUMN
COLUMN
GREY MATTER
CORTEX
BASE
PORTION
DAMAGED
COMPRESSION
DIAMETER
MEMBRANES
SKIN
CENTRAL CANAL
CANAL
END
ENDS
CONTINUOUS
BONES
LEGS
AXONS
FIBERS
LUNGS
ORGANS
MESSAGES
TISSUES
NECK
FLUID
BLOOD VESSELS
NERVE CORD
NERVE
GRAY MATTER
MATTER
MUSCLES
SPINE
KNOTS
DURA MATER
EPIDURAL
LOWER END
TETHERING
SKULL
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Cord"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Cord is twisted fibre, usually intermediate between rope and string. (Web site)
  2. The cord is continuous with the medulla oblongata at the foramen magnum. (Web site)
  3. The cord is an extension of the medulla oblongata of the brain that extends at the level of the first or second lumbar vertebra.
  4. The cord is protected by the same three membranes which surround the brain.
  5. The cord is segmented and a pair of spinal nerves branch off (one to the left and the other to the right) at each vertebra.

Branch

  1. The nerves that branch out from the spinal cord to the other parts of the body are called lower motor neurons (LMNs) and dorsal root sensory neurons. (Web site)

Nervous

  1. Nerve Fibres: The spinal cord is a column of nervous tissue, which is spread throughout the body; they carry impulses to and from the brain.
  2. This release allows free exchange between CSF and nervous tissue of brain and spinal cord. (Web site)
  3. The spinal cord is a long, thin, tubular bundle of nervous tissue and support cells that extends from the brain (the medulla specifically). (Web site)

Disorder

  1. Multiple sclerosis: A disorder of the central nervous system of unknown cause in which the body's immune system attacks myelin in the brain and spinal cord.
  2. Spinal stenosis is a disorder that results from the narrowing of the spinal canal surrounding the spinal cord and eventually compressing the cord.
  3. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a disorder that affects the nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord (peripheral nerves). (Web site)

Segment

  1. Medulla oblongata is connected to the pons and is the segment of the brain that is attached to the spinal cord.
  2. The base of this segment is largely occupied by bands of fibres connecting higher regions with the medulla oblongata and cord, and constitutes the crus. (Web site)
  3. The cord possesses one ganglion per segment, each of which produces lateral nerve fibres that run into the limbs. (Web site)

Segments

  1. On this basis the spinal cord is divided into the following segments: 8 cervical (C), 12 thoracic (T), 5 lumbar (L), 5 sacral (S), and 1 coccygeal (Coc).
  2. Cranial nerves are nerves that emerge directly from the brain in contrast to spinal nerves which emerge from segments of the spinal cord.
  3. The fibers that form the spinal accessory nerve are formed by lower motor neurons located in the upper segments of the spinal cord. (Web site)

Cavity

  1. Syrinx (syringomyelia, hydromyelia): These terms all refer to a fluid filled cavity in the spinal cord. (Web site)
  2. Instead, the spinal cord is surrounded by the epidural space (cavity), which contains tissue, nerves, and blood vessels. (Web site)
  3. Fourth ventricle: One cavity in a system of four communicating cavities within the brain that are continuous with the central canal of the spinal cord. (Web site)

Membrane

  1. Nervous system- The brain and spinal cord are surrounded by fluid contained by a membrane called the dura, which is comprised of connective tissue. (Web site)
  2. Between the surfaces of the brain and the skull there are three layers of membrane called the meninges, which completely cover the brain and spinal cord. (Web site)
  3. The surfaces of the brain and cord are closely invested with a membrane, the pia mater, carrying blood-vessels. (Web site)

Vertebral Column

  1. As the brain is encased and protected by the skull, the spinal cord is enclosed and protected by the vertebral column (spine). (Web site)
  2. Spine: 1) The column of bone known as the vertebral column, which surrounds and protects the spinal cord. (Web site)
  3. The brain and spinal cord form the central nervous system (CNS). They're surrounded and protected by the bones of the skull and the vertebral column. (Web site)

Column

  1. In early life, the spinal cord extends the entire length of the vertebral column, but with age, the column grows faster than the cord.
  2. The spinal cord is a column of nerves that connects your brain with the rest of your body, allowing you to control your movements.
  3. The vertebrae surround and protect the spinal cord, a column of nerves running down from the brain. (Web site)

Grey Matter

  1. Through both white and grey matter run different types of non-conducting glial cells, which provide nutrients and wrap nerve fibres in the cord with myelin. (Web site)
  2. Grey matter is found in clusters of neurons in the brain and spinal cord, and in cortical layers that line their surfaces. (Web site)
  3. Grey matter in the brain and spinal cord consists mainly of brain ells while white matte r consists of masses of axons. (Web site)

Cortex

  1. Thalamus is the principle relay station for sensory impulses from the spinal cord, brainstem, cerebellum and other parts of the cerebrum to the cortex. (Web site)
  2. The highest mRNA levels of Kif1Bbeta were found in the cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum and the grey matter of the spinal cord. (Web site)
  3. Axons of pyramidal cells generally leave the cortex and extend to other regions of the brain and spinal cord.

Base

  1. The brain stem, consisting of the midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata, lies at the base of the cerebrum, and connects the brain to the spinal cord.
  2. The lowest part of the brain stem, the medulla oblongata, merges with the spinal cord at the large hole (foramen magnum) in the base of the skull. (Web site)
  3. The spinal cord extends out of the base of the skull through the vertebrae of the spinal column. (Web site)

Portion

  1. These nerves branch off at junctures along this pathway to connect each portion of the body to the brain and spinal cord, the central nervous system.
  2. Parasympathetic nerves arise from the brain and sacral (near the legs) portion of the cord. (Web site)
  3. The portion of the brain, consisting of the medulla oblongata, pons Varolii, and midbrain, that connects the spinal cord to the forebrain and cerebrum. (Web site)

Damaged

  1. Peripheral neuropathy occurs when nerves in the peripheral nervous system -- those outside of the brain and spinal cord -- become damaged. (Web site)
  2. When the spine is damaged, there may also be damage to the spinal cord.
  3. Injury to the vertebrae does not always mean the spinal cord has been damaged.

Compression

  1. If the pain is uncontrolled or if there are signs of cord compression, however, surgery is necessary to relieve pressure on the cord or spinal nerves. (Web site)
  2. It should be noted that unlike cord compression from stenosis of the spinal canal, laminectomy has no alleviating effect.
  3. They tend to develop symptoms of cord compression (loss of sensation or movement below the injury) rapidly after minor injury. (Web site)

Diameter

  1. The spinal cord is a made up of nerve cells which grow to look like a rope or cord about one half inch in diameter.
  2. Spinal Stenosis - Reduction in the diameter of the spinal canal due to new bone formation which may result in pressure on the spinal cord or nerve roots.
  3. Compression of the cord occurs if the initial diameter is 10 mm or less; it being uncommon with the diameter of more than 13 mm. (Web site)

Membranes

  1. Surrounding the CNS are three layers of membranes, the meninges, that isolate the brain and spinal cord from the rest of the body. (Web site)
  2. The brain and spinal cord are wrapped in membranes (meninges) and nourished by a special liquid called cerebrospinal fluid. (Web site)
  3. Central nervous system - The brain and spinal cord are enclosed within three sequential connective tissue membranes called meninges.

Skin

  1. Most often these parts include the skin, bones, liver, brain, heart, and the membranes that protect the brain and spinal cord (meninges). (Web site)
  2. The leukemia cells can spread outside the blood to other parts of the body, including the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), skin, and gums. (Web site)
  3. Peripheral nerves also relay information back to the spinal cord and brain from the skin, joints, and other organs. (Web site)

Central Canal

  1. HYDROMYELIA - Expansion of the spinal cord due to increased size of the central canal of the cord which is filled with CSF.
  2. The central canal of the spinal cord runs the length of the cord and contains cerebral spinal fluid. (Web site)
  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid: A liquid found within the ventricles of the brain and the central canal of the spinal cord. (Web site)

Canal

  1. Occasionally, the syrinx will form in the central canal of the cord, causing a dilation of the canal known as hydromyelia. (Web site)
  2. The spinal cord only extends to about L2. Below this level, the canal encloses a bundle of nerves that goes to the lower limbs and pelvic organs.
  3. The subarachnoid space is the canal in the spinal column that carries cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) between the brain and the spinal cord. (Web site)

End

  1. In order to reach their proper openings to exit the column, the last eleven pair of spinal nerves hang below the end of the spinal cord like long hairs.
  2. The band of union between this end of the cord, the cerebellum, and the cerebrum is termed the pons varolii. (Web site)
  3. To do so, Loki tied one end of a cord around the beard of a nanny goat and the other end around his testicles.

Ends

  1. The spinal cord begins at the base of the brain and ends in the lumbar spine area in a bundle of nerves called the cauda equina. (Web site)
  2. The spinal cord comes off the base of the brain, runs throughout the cervical and thoracic spine, and ends at the lower part of the thoracic spine.
  3. The capsule itself ends within the cerebrum, but the axons that pass through it continue down to through brain stem and spinal cord. (Web site)

Continuous

  1. Brain is suspended in the cerebrospinal fluid, continuous with the spinal cord (structure made up of neurons and nerve fibers) and enclosed within the skull. (Web site)
  2. Foramen Magnum: A large opening in the base of the skull through which the spinal cord becomes continuous with the medulla oblongata. (Web site)
  3. At the top, it is continuous with the pons and the midbrain; at the bottom, it makes a gradual transition into the spinal cord at the foramen magnum. (Web site)

Bones

  1. The dura mater of the cord is not adherent to the bones of the spinal canal, which have an independent periosteum. (Web site)
  2. Nerves emerge from both sides of the spinal cord (i.e., spinal nerves) through the narrow gaps (foramina) between bones of the spinal column (vertebrae). (Web site)
  3. Just as the skull protects the brain, the bones of the spinal column protect the spinal cord. (Web site)

Legs

  1. The nerves that extend from the spinal cord and travel throughout the body, arms, legs, and head are the peripheral nervous system. (Web site)
  2. Ataxia results from the degeneration of nerve tissue in the spinal cord and of nerves that control muscle movement in the arms and legs.
  3. This happens because the nerves that exit your spinal cord innervate ("attach to") the skin in your arms and legs.

Axons

  1. Corticospinal tract The corticospinal or pyramidal tract is a collection of axons that travel between the cerebral cortex of the brain and the spinal cord.
  2. Damage to LMNs (either the cell bodies in the spinal cord, or the axons in the peripheral nerves) produces a different result. (Web site)
  3. Many cell bodies in the ventral horn of the spinal cord send axons through the ventral root to muscles to control movement. (Web site)

Fibers

  1. All the messages that are transmitted between the brain and spinal cord pass through the medulla—a part of the brain stem—via fibers.
  2. All the messages that are transmitted between the brain and spinal cord pass through the medulla via fibers in the white matter.
  3. The dorsal root contains afferent (sensory) fibers that transmit information to the spinal cord from the sensory receptors.

Lungs

  1. When one or both vocal cords are paralyzed, the open cord(s) allows food or liquids to slip into the trachea and lungs.
  2. This is called "extramedullary spread." It may involve the brain and spinal cord, the testicles, ovaries, kidneys, lungs, heart, intestines, or other organs. (Web site)

Organs

  1. If the spinal cord is only partly damaged, some messages may continue to pass between the brain and the muscles and organs.
  2. The organs of the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) are covered by 3 connective tissue layers collectively called the meninges.
  3. Spinal nerves emerge by a ventral and dorsal root between each vertebra and connect the spinal cord with organs and muscles. (Web site)

Messages

  1. Messages from the cortex to the spinal cord and nerves that branch from the spinal cord are sent through the pons and the brainstem. (Web site)
  2. Messages from the cortex to the spinal cord and nerves that branch from the spinal cord are sent through the pons and the brain stem.
  3. The CNS has sensory neurons to convey impulses toward the brain and spinal cord, motor neurons to send messages to effectors, and neurons to connect the two. (Web site)

Tissues

  1. When DCS occurs, bubbles disrupt tissues in the joints, brain, spinal cord, lungs, and other organs. (Web site)
  2. Meningitis An infection or inflammation of the membranes or tissues that cover the brain and spinal cord, and caused by bacteria or a virus.
  3. The dura mater is a tough, fibrous membrane that surrounds and protects the tissues of the brain and spinal cord. (Web site)

Neck

  1. The nerves that branch off your spinal cord down your back and neck are called lower motor neurons. (Web site)
  2. When there is damage to the nerves in the neck or spinal cord, surgery to fuse the neck may be necessary.
  3. They are all mixed nerves, and they provide a two-way communication system between the spinal cord and parts of the arms, legs, neck and trunk of the body.

Fluid

  1. This involves inserting a needle into the spinal canal to extract a sample of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the fluid that envelops the brain and spinal cord. (Web site)
  2. The brain and spinal cord are protected (surrounded) by bones, membranes, and fluid.
  3. CSF is a clear fluid that bathes the brain and spinal cord while protecting it, like a cushion, from exterior injury. (Web site)

Blood Vessels

  1. The pia mater hugs the surface of the brain and spinal cord, and is filled with blood vessels that supply the nerve tissue below. (Web site)
  2. Marfan syndrome most often affects the connective tissue of the heart and blood vessels, eyes, bones, lungs, and covering of the spinal cord.
  3. The innermost layer, or pia mater, is in direct contact with the brain and spinal cord and contains the blood vessels that supply them. (Web site)

Nerve Cord

  1. The nervous system of insects is complex, including a number of ganglia and a ventral, double nerve cord. (Web site)
  2. The backbone of vertebrates protects the nerve cord and serves as the axis of the internal skeleton. (Web site)
  3. It is a cartilaginous rod running underneath, and behind, the nerve cord and it develops into the vertebral column in vertebrates.

Nerve

  1. Nerve cord a thick bundle of nerves usually extending longitudinally through the body from the brain.
  2. Your central nervous system is made up of your brain, nerve cord, and spinal cord.
  3. The brain then sends out impulses through a nerve cord to muscles, which respond to the stimulus. (Web site)

Gray Matter

  1. In the spinal cord the synapses between sensory and motor and interneurons occurs in the gray matter. (Web site)
  2. Sensory axons enter the spinal cord through the dorsal root and often synapse on interneurons (green) in the gray matter.
  3. A cross-section of the spinal cord resembles a butterfly with its wings outspread (gray matter) surrounded by white matter.

Matter

  1. The stem of the brain, the medulla oblongata, and the spinal cord, consists externally of white matter, the grey matter being internal. (Web site)
  2. The white matter contains nerve fibers (axons) entering and exiting the gray matter, and traveling up and down the spinal cord, linking it to the brain.
  3. Brainstem - found at the base of the brain, it forms the link between the cerebral cortex, white matter and the spinal cord. (Web site)

Muscles

  1. Peripheral nerve stimulation - Peripheral nerves are nerves that go from the outer parts of the body (skin, muscles, bones, organs etc) to the spinal cord.
  2. The axons from these motor neurons then leave the cord to make connections with the muscles in the body. (Web site)
  3. A Peripheral neuropathy is a malfunction of nerves that relay information between the body's organs, skin, muscles and joints, and the spinal cord and brain.

Spine

  1. Spinal tumors, or growths that develop on the bones and ligaments of the spine, on the spinal cord, or on nerve roots. (Web site)
  2. The spinal cord runs through a canal located at the back of the vertebrae, and extends from the brain stem to the lumbar region of the spine.
  3. In addition, the bones of the spine (vertebrae) overlying the open portion of the spinal cord do not fully form and remain unfused and open.

Knots

  1. Knots are used to tie up a bundle with cord.

Dura Mater

  1. MENINGES - The three membranes covering the spinal cord and brain termed dura mater, arachnoid mater and pia mater. (Web site)
  2. The spinal cord is covered by three layers of meninges: pia, arachnoid and dura mater. (Web site)
  3. Normally, the dura mater is attached to the skull, or to the bones of the vertebral canal in the spinal cord. (Web site)

Epidural

  1. Epidural: Epidural medications are medications injected into the space where spinal fluid circulates around the spinal cord.

Lower End

  1. The flag is fixed to one lower end of the cord, and is then raised by pulling on the other end.
  2. The dura tapers at the lower end of the spinal cord, forming a sheath around its thin remnant (the filum terminale). (Web site)
  3. The abnormality is confined to the lower end of the spinal cord, and there is no malformation of the brain. (Web site)

Tethering

  1. The reason for such presentation may be related to tethering of the cord (the distal end of the spinal cord is fixed in position).
  2. A defective filum terminale is short and fibrous, with reduced elasticity or none, thus tethering the spinal cord at its lower end.
  3. Tethering may also develop after spinal cord injury and scar tissue can block the flow of fluids around the spinal cord.

Skull

  1. The arachnoid mater envelops nerves that arise directly from the brain or spinal cord, until they exit the skull or vertebral column.
  2. The vertebrate central nervous system comprises the brain and spinal cord, which are enclosed by the bones of the skull and vertebral column.
  3. For example, the bones of the skull protect the brain, the vertebrae of the spine protect the spinal cord, and the ribs protect the heart and lungs.

Categories

  1. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Society > Humans > Spinal Cord
  2. Nerves
  3. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Society > Security > Rope
  4. Knot
  5. String

Related Keywords

    * Anterior * Anterior Horn * Body * Brain * Cells * Cell Bodies * Cervical * Covering * Coverings * Damage * Dorsal * Dorsal Root * Dorsal Roots * Dorsal Root Ganglia * Fetus * Ganglia * Injuries * Injury * Knot * Lateral * Medulla * Motor * Nerves * Nerve Root * Nerve Roots * Nervous System * Neurons * Paralysis * Placenta * Posterior * Posterior Aspect * Rope * Sacral * Spermatic Cord * Spinal Cord * Spinal Ganglia * Stem Cells * String * Testis * Thoracic * Umbilical Cord * Umbilical Cord Blood * Ventral
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  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Links checked: July 27, 2013.
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