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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Bicameral Parliament > Cortes   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
SPANISH CORTES
POWERS
POWER
CONTROL
DECISIONS
REPRESENTATIVES
CONSTITUTION
MONARCHY
MIGUEL
CATALAN
CROWN
COASTAL CITY
GOVERNMENT
SECURITY FORCES
CITY COUNCILS
MONARCH
MONARCHS
KINGDOMS
PEOPLE
COMMONERS
SPAIN
VALLADOLID
CATALONIA
ARAGON
CASTILE
LOWER HOUSE
BICAMERAL PARLIAMENT
CORTES
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Cortes"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. The Cortes are a bicameral parliament composed of a lower house (Congreso de los Diputados, congress of deputies) and an upper house (Senado, senate). (Web site)
  2. Cortes was appointed mayor (alcalde) of Santiago. (Web site)
  3. Dr Martha Cortes is a cosmetic dentist in Manhattan, NY providing laser gum disease treatment.

Spanish Cortes

  1. On May 1, 1865, the Queen of Spain sanctioned a law of the Spanish Cortes providing for the relinquishment of the colony. (Web site)

Powers

  1. These and other powers have since 1980 been transferred to the Autonomous Community by the Cortes Generales under the Gernika Statute. (Web site)

Power

  1. It is thought that these legislatures exercised more real power over local affairs than the Castilian Cortes did. (Web site)

Control

  1. The Cortes had powers to control the king spending and taxing. (Web site)

Decisions

  1. Executive councils also existed in each of these realms, which were initially tasked with overseeing the implementation of decisions made by the Cortes. (Web site)

Representatives

  1. In addition, some representatives (elected from the Cortes members by itself) were permanent advisors to the King, even when the Cortes was not. (Web site)

Constitution

  1. The Cortes has power to enact any law and to amend the constitution.

Monarchy

  1. The cortes of Coimbra, the battle of Aljubarrota and the treaty of Windsor mark the three final stages in the consolidation of the monarchy. (Web site)

Miguel

  1. The Cortes of 1828 assented to Miguel's wish, proclaiming him king as Miguel I of Portugal and nullifying the Constitutional Charter. (Web site)

Catalan

  1. The Cortes and Catalan and Basque autonomy were abolished. (Web site)

Crown

  1. The Comuneros Revolt was originally fomented by some of the eighteen cities in the crown of Castile represented in the Castilian Cortes. (Web site)

Coastal City

  1. The Cortes found refuge in the fortified, coastal city of Cádiz.

Government

  1. The king, the government, and the Cortes Generales A copy of the Spanish Constitution, signed by King Juan Carlos, is held at the Palace of the Cortes.

Security Forces

  1. On 23 February 1981, rebel elements among the security forces seized the Cortes and tried to impose a military-backed government.

City Councils

  1. In the Cortes de Toledo in 1480 they created the corregidores, representatives of the crown, to supervise the city councils. (Web site)

Monarch

  1. The president is elected by the Cortes from among its members, then formally named by the monarch of Spain.

Monarchs

  1. One of the major points of friction between the Cortes and the monarchs was the power of raising and lowering taxes. (Web site)

Kingdoms

  1. The Cortes of the Crown of Aragon kingdoms retained their power to control the king's spending with regard to the finances of those kingdoms. (Web site)
  2. The union of the Cortes Almost immediately after the union of the two kingdoms under Ferdinand III the parliaments of Castile and León were united.

People

  1. Cortes decided on the causeway to Tlacopan, needing the quickest route out of Tenochtitlan with all his provisions and people. (Web site)

Commoners

  1. What is considered to be the first Spanish Parliament (with the presence of commoners), Cortes - was held in the Kingdom of Leon in 1118. (Web site)

Spain

  1. The dynasty began with the acclamation of Philip II of Spain as Philip I of Portugal in 1580, officially recognized in 1581 by the Cortes of Tomar. (Web site)
  2. Revolution and anarchy broke out in Spain in the two years that followed; it was only in 1870 that the Cortes declared that Spain would have a king again.
  3. Thus, the Cortes in Spain did not develop towards a parliamentary system as in the British case, but towards the mentioned rubberstamping of royal decrees. (Web site)

Valladolid

  1. In the Castilian Cortes of Valladolid of 1506, and of Madrid of 1510 he was sworn as prince of Asturias, heir of his mother the queen Joanna.[ 4].

Catalonia

  1. The Catalan government passed an autonomy plan in 2005, and the Cortes voted to approve increased autonomy for Catalonia in 2006. (Web site)

Aragon

  1. Because Ferdinand could produce another heir, the Cortes of Aragon refused to recognise Joanna and Philip as the heirs presumptive to the Kingdom of Aragon. (Web site)

Castile

  1. After the union of the Kingdoms of Leon and Castile under the Crown of Castile, their Cortes were united as well in 1258. (Web site)
  2. At the Cortes of Valladolid in August 1325, the fifteen-year-old Alfonso XI of Castile dismissed his tutors and assumed control of his kingdom's affairs.
  3. He would be named administrator of the kingdom by the Cortes of Castile in 1510, although he would entrust the government mainly to Cisneros. (Web site)

Lower House

  1. Spain's 35 million voters were electing 350 members of the Cortes, or lower house of parliament, and 208 members of the 264-member upper house, the Senate. (Web site)
  2. At stake were all 350 seats in the lower house of the Cortes Generales, the Congress of Deputies, and 208 seats in upper house, the Senate.

Bicameral Parliament

  1. Spain is a constitutional monarchy, with a hereditary monarch and a bicameral parliament, the Cortes Generales or National Assembly.

Cortes

  1. In Spain, the cortes of Aragon, Valencia, and Catalonia (most of the kingdoms of the Crown of Aragon) declared themselves in favour of the Austrian Archduke. (Web site)
  2. Spain is a constitutional monarchy, with a hereditary monarch and a bicameral parliament, the Cortes or National Assembly. (Web site)
  3. In 1519, he was crowned before the Cortes of Aragon in Zaragoza, and the Corts of Catalonia followed.

Categories

  1. Bicameral Parliament
  2. Countries > European Union > Spain > Castile
  3. Science > Geography > Regions > Catalonia
  4. Aragon
  5. Lower House
  6. Books about "Cortes" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Cortes"
  Originally created: August 01, 2010.
  Links checked: March 16, 2013.
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