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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Architecture > Home > Cooking > Foods > Curry   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
PAKISTANI
MALVANI
CURRIES
CURRYS
INDIAN RESTAURANTS
COCONUT MILK
CHINESE CURRY
CURRY LEAVES
WORD
MUSTARD SEEDS
NORTH INDIAN
SPICES USED
CURRY POWDER
CURRY SAUCE
RICE
HEAVILY
BRITISH
HIGHLY POPULAR
FLAVOUR
DISH
CURRY HOUSE
SPICES
VEGETABLE CURRY
YELLOW
KARI
BRITISH RAJ
HOT
ROGAN JOSH
EAST
JAPAN
CURRY MILE
POPULAR
SPELT
POPULAR DISH
DISH MADE
USUALLY EATEN
USES CURRY
TRADITIONAL BRITISH
SYLHET
DRY SPICES
PINEAPPLE
SPICY
BROUGHT
SIMILAR
CURRY
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Curry"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Curry is a distinctively spiced dish which is common in Indian cuisine but is found in the cuisine of many countries. (Web site)
  2. Curry is an international dish that has recognized the world over. (Web site)
  3. Curry is also a word for grooming a horse. (Web site)
  4. Curry - A Journey Due to a blackboards in binds Middle East, I was practically brought up see curry.
  5. A curry is a sauce prepared with spice blends called masalas. (Web site)

Pakistani

  1. A favourite Pakistani curry is Karahi, either mutton or chicken cooked in a dry sauce.
  2. A ghoust is a type of Pakistani or Indian curry dish made from lamb.

Malvani

  1. Paplet Saar is a dish consisting of Pomfret cooked in traditional Malvani fish curry.
  2. It differs from Murgh Malvani in a way that it's curry is red as opposed to the reddish-brown Malvani curry.

Curries

  1. The standard Japanese curry contains onions, carrots, potatoes and a meat.
  2. Negli anni ottanta nell'area di Birmingha nasce una nuova variante di curry, il "balti", che si diffonde poi rapidamente ad altre parti del paese. (Web site)
  3. Cambodia, Hawaii, the United States, Myanmar, mainland China, South Korea and Singapore also have their own versions of curry.
  4. A curry potato salad recipe. (Web site)
  5. The curry is especially thick and rich to prevent itself from running. (Web site)

Currys

  1. Cambodia, Hawaii, the United States, Myanmar, mainland China, South Korea and Singapore also have their own versions of curry.
  2. It wraps the dosa around a onion and potato curry. (Web site)
  3. Colourful Pilau rice perfect as the base to any Asian curry or beef carbonade.
  4. The term curry is applied inflationarily to many dishes of Far Eastern origin.
  5. If it is done well the dhansak is an excellent curry with contrasting flavours and textures. (Web site)

Indian Restaurants

  1. The popularity of curry in the UK encouraged the growth of Indian restaurants.
  2. One of the largest concentrations of Indian restaurants outside the Indian subcontinent can be found on the "Curry Mile" in Rusholme, Manchester. (Web site)

Coconut Milk

  1. Pasanda - a mild curry sauce made with cream, coconut milk, and almonds.
  2. Malaysian curries typically use curry powders rich in turmeric, coconut milk, shallots, ginger, belacan (shrimp paste), chilis, and garlic.
  3. Korma: A milder, creamier curry originating in northern India, korma gets its texture from a coconut milk or yogurt base.
  4. Pasanda - a mild curry sauce made with cream, coconut milk, and almonds.

Chinese Curry

  1. Chinese curry is popular in North America, and there are many different varieties of Chinese curry, depending on each restaurant.
  2. Unlike other Asian curries, which usually have a thicker consistency, Chinese curry is often watery in nature.

Curry Leaves

  1. Curry leaves are the young leaves of the curry tree ( Chalcas koenigii), a member of the Rutaceae family that grows wild and in gardens all over India.
  2. Fresh curry leaves are oval in shape and best used at about 1 inch in length.
  3. Mustard seeds are used in almost every dish, along with onions, curry leaves, sliced red chillies fried in hot oil.
  4. Malayali curries of Kerala typically contain shredded coconut paste or coconut milk, curry leaves, and various spices.
  5. In Aceh, curries use daun salam koja or daun kari (translated as 'curry leaves').

Word

  1. In British cuisine, the word curry was primarily used to denote a sauce-based dish flavoured with curry powder or a paste made from the powder and oils.
  2. And since medicine has not shown any harmful effects of curry consumption, the use of the word "addiction" is highly contestable.
  3. It originates from the Tamil word curry meaning various kinds of dishes common in South India made with vegetables or meat and usually eaten with rice. (Web site)
  4. In India, the word curry actually refers to anything cooked and eaten with rice.
  5. The word "Khari" from which "curry" is derived, comes from Southern India and refers to a sauce of any kind. (Web site)

Mustard Seeds

  1. Mustard seeds are used in almost every dish, along with onions, curry leaves, sliced red chillies fried in hot oil.
  2. Heat oil in pan.Splutter mustard seeds,urad dal,curry leaves.Then saute shallots and add it to the curry.

North Indian

  1. This is because it is the one category of Thai curry that really is curry, and is adapted from Indian cuisine.
  2. The sauces for other curries are usually thinner than a true Indian curry, but some exceptions can be made.
  3. Egg Curry There are several different styles for making Egg Curry and this recipe is North Indian in origin.
  4. There is, however, a particular north Indian and Pakistani dish which is given the name curry or khadi - this involves yoghurt, ghee and besan (see below).

Spices Used

  1. Most recipes and producers of curry powder usually include coriander, turmeric, cumin, and fenugreek in their blends.
  2. Some curry powder ingredients are: black pepper, chile pepper, cloves, coriander, fenugreek, cinnamon, cardamom, cumin, ginger tumeric and nutmeg. (Web site)
  3. Curry Powder is a blend of many spices and is used widely in savory dishes throughout India and Southeast Asia. (Web site)
  4. Dry spice mixtures are also called "Garam masala" or commonly known in the world as "Curry powder". (Web site)
  5. The word 'curry' does not exist in any Indian culinary dictionary and curry powder is non-existent among Indian condiments.

Curry Powder

  1. There is a common misconception that all curries are made from curry powder or that a certain meat or vegetable is curried.
  2. Yellow curry are more similar to Indian curries, with their use of turmeric and cumin.
  3. Lesser ingredients in these Western yellow curry powders are often coriander, cumin, fenugreek, mustard, chili, black pepper and salt.
  4. Dry spice mixtures are also called "Garam masala" or commonly known in the world as "Curry powder". (Web site)
  5. In Indian cooking, cloves are a basic ingredient of garam masala and are often used in curry powders.

Curry Sauce

  1. Curry sauce occasionally would include sultanas.
  2. The first, Rogan Josh, featured tender pieces of lamb cooked in a yogurt-based curry sauce.
  3. Other, older recipes for cold chicken and curry sauce also exist, so the origin of the dish could date back even further. (Web site)
  4. Katsu-kar-- is a deep-fried pork cutlet in breadcrumbs with curry sauce.
  5. Chicken tikka masala is a westernised Indian dish based on baked chicken chunks (chicken tikka) cooked in a curry sauce.

Rice

  1. Sri Lankan cuisine mostly consists of rice and curry meals, and revolves heavily around seafood.
  2. It is usually eaten as kar-- raisu - curry, rice and often pickles, served on the same plate and eaten with a spoon, a common lunchtime canteen dish. (Web site)
  3. Last check: 2007-10-22) Curry is usually eaten with Rice and Sambar or Rasam. (Web site)
  4. Like curry, the mix may vary, but usually contains tumeric, rice powder, coriander, pepper, cumin and fenugreek.

Heavily

  1. Sri Lankan cuisine mostly consists of rice and curry meals, and revolves heavily around seafood.
  2. I assumed, however, that the food would be heavily spiced with curry, and I'm not a big fan of curry.

British

  1. One popular curry is rendang from West Sumatran cuisine, not Malaysia as is claimed in many British restaurants.
  2. The widely popular British curry dish chicken tikka masala was also produced by Bangladeshi immigrants from Sylhet.
  3. The widely popular British curry dish chicken tikka masala was likely produced by Pakistani immigrants from Sylhet, such as Rob Coombes. (Web site)
  4. The concept of curry was later brought to the West by British colonialists in India from the 18th century.
  5. Many British people regard "going for a curry" as a satisfying outing.

Highly Popular

  1. Solkadhi or Soul Curry is an energizing curry drink, highly popular in Konkan.
  2. Malvani Mutton Curry is a highly popular dish in the entire Konkan region.

Flavour

  1. In contrast, the use of prepared curry pastes cover only a small part of the flavour added.
  2. Different sauce sachets are included according to the flavour of the Pot Noodle, and include soy sauce, tomato ketchup and curry sauce.

Dish

  1. Sandeep Bhateja ( Punjabi) the world famous curry chef from Agra, India, is renowned for incorporating various roots into exotic curry dishes.
  2. Along with tea, curry is one of the few dishes or drinks that is truly "pan-Asian", but specifically, its roots come from India.
  3. It is technically a mild curry dish, though the addition of sometimes large amounts of tartrazine causes the dish to often look orange.

Curry House

  1. Leicester has become well known for its curry houses, being increasingly known as the curry capital of England.
  2. The curry house rogan is also red but the colour comes from red peppers and tomatoes rather than Kashmiri chillies. (Web site)
  3. Brick Lane in East London is another street that is home to many curry houses.
  4. The traditional British Curry House In recent times, Indian cooking has moved upmarket, particularly in major cities such as London.
  5. Some UK curry houses also make a hotter version called tindaloo.

Spices

  1. Rendang is a Malaysian dish that uses curry spices, although it is less watery than a conventional Malaysian curry. (Web site)
  2. In Tamil cuisine, from which the word originated, curry refers to any dry preparation involving meat or vegetables shallow-fried with dry spices.
  3. Malayali curries of Kerala typically contain shredded coconut paste or coconut milk, curry leaves, and various spices.
  4. Mullitgatawny contains chicken or meat or vegetable stock mixed with yogurt or cheese or coconut milk and is seasoned with curry and various other spices. (Web site)

Vegetable Curry

  1. Chapatis are usually eaten with vegetable curry dishes, and pieces of the chapati are used to wrap around and pick up each bite of the cooked dish. (Web site)
  2. Prepared with almonds, sultanas and exotic herbs, tomotoes and cucumber, Served with vegetable curry.

Yellow

  1. Most commercial curry powders available in Britain, the U.S. and Canada, rely heavily on ground turmeric, in turn producing a very yellow sauce.
  2. Normally a bright yellow colour, coronation chicken is almost curry -like in its flavour.

Kari

  1. In Indonesian, gulai and kari or kare is based on curry.
  2. Curry is derived from the Tamil word kari, which means sauce.
  3. No doubt your chicken curry is "murgA kArI".(Please note that 'A' sounds like "umbrella "& I for "Italy""India" ). (Web site)

British Raj

  1. Similarly, the Railway Mutton Curry is a direct throw back to the days of the British Raj, when traveling by train was considered aristocratic.
  2. Many British people regard "going for a curry" as a satisfying outing.
  3. The spread of curry and curry recipes beyond its home is linked to the presence of the British Raj in India.

Hot

  1. Tea, hot or iced, is often drunk with curry.
  2. Serve Chicken Curry with hot Chapatis (Indian flatbread) or plain boiled rice. (Web site)

Rogan Josh

  1. Rogan Josh is a tomato -based lamb curry dish.
  2. According to Lizzie Collingham's book Curry: A tale of cooks & conquerors, Rogan Josh was brought to India by the Moghuls.

East

  1. Curry Blend – Curry is a combination of spices used in East Indian cooking. (Web site)
  2. Brick Lane in East London is another street that is home to many curry houses. (Web site)

Japan

  1. In northern and eastern Japan including Tokyo, pork is the most popular meat for curry.
  2. The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force still traditionally have curry every Friday for lunch and many ships have their own unique recipes. (Web site)

Curry Mile

  1. The Curry Mile is a nickname for the main high street of Rusholme in Manchester, England, part of the larger Wilmslow Road.
  2. A choice of a thousand vindaloos and birianis on the curry mile in Rusholme. (Web site)

Popular

  1. British-style curry restaurants are also popular in Canada, Australia and New Zealand.
  2. Curries are not confined to India and the United Kingdom, English style curry restaurants are common and increasingly popular in Australia and New Zealand. (Web site)
  3. The very popular and familiar curry dish "Vindaloo" is derived from the Portugese word "Vinha De Alhos" i.e.

Spelt

  1. Mutton Korma : Korma, usually spelt Kurma in Malaysia, is a comparatively mild [not hot] curry.
  2. Phaal, sometimes spelt as phall or paal, is an Indian curry dish, red to red-orange in colour. (Web site)

Popular Dish

  1. In the West Indies, curry is a very popular dish.
  2. In Trinidad and Tobago and Guyana curry is a very popular dish among the Caribbean communities.
  3. The original popular dish was created with simple curry powder as fresh curry spices were, in post-war Britain, almost unobtainable. (Web site)

Dish Made

  1. The Dak Bungalow Curry was another famous dish during Colonial times. (Web site)
  2. Top Saag Curry: Aromatic curried dish made from greens (saag). (Web site)
  3. Chicken tikka massala - An Anglo-Indian dish made by cooking chunks of marinated chicken in a curry sauce. (Web site)
  4. Curry powder is an amalgam of some "Indian" spices best applied to the flavorings of curry dips and dishes where a hint of curry influence is desired.

Usually Eaten

  1. It is usually eaten as kar-- raisu - curry, rice and often pickles, served on the same plate and eaten with a spoon, a common lunchtime canteen dish. (Web site)
  2. Last check: 2007-10-22) Curry is usually eaten with Rice and Sambar or Rasam. (Web site)

Uses Curry

  1. The American Chinese version uses curry powder.
  2. Rendang is a Malaysian dish that uses curry spices, although it is less watery than a conventional Malaysian curry.

Traditional British

  1. Curry sauce (or curry gravy) is a British use of curry as a condiment, usually served warm with traditional British fast food dishes such as chips.
  2. But, many curry recipes are contained in 19th-century cookbooks such as those of Mrs Beeton, and the introducer of curry into british cuisine, Emily Glasse.
  3. Curry Powder Packaged curry powder is probably a British invention.
  4. The traditional British Curry House In recent times, Indian cooking has moved upmarket, particularly in major cities such as London.

Sylhet

  1. The widely popular British curry dish chicken tikka masala was likely produced by Pakistani immigrants from Sylhet, such as Rob Coombes. (Web site)
  2. The widely popular British curry dish chicken tikka masala was also produced by Bangladeshi immigrants from Sylhet.

Dry Spices

  1. In Tamil cuisine, from which the word originated, curry refers to any dry preparation involving meat or vegetables shallow-fried with dry spices.
  2. Tamil curry refers to shallow-fried meat or vegetables cooked along with dry spices.

Pineapple

  1. Sometimes curry powder, raisins or slices of pineapple are used to give a stamppot an exotic touch. (Web site)
  2. Kaeng Khua Saparot (Prawn And Pineapple Curry) The pineapple adds a touch of tart sweetness to this dish. (Web site)

Spicy

  1. It is a true reflection of both worlds where the spicy curry is given as much importance as the bland cutlets and roasts. (Web site)
  2. In Anglo-Indian Cuisine the spicy --- Indian Curry--- is given as much importance as the bland --- English Roasts---.

Brought

  1. The concept of curry was later brought to the West by British colonialists in India from the 18th century.
  2. Due to a childhood in the Middle East, I was practically brought up on curry.

Similar

  1. This is similar to curry powder, containing coriander, chiles, cinnamon, nutmeg, saffron, and garlic. (Web site)
  2. Curry chicken, similar type of chicken and spice dish.

Curry

  1. Unlike other Asian curries, which usually have a thicker consistency, Chinese curry is often watery in nature.
  2. Most commercial curry powders available in Britain, the U.S. and Canada, rely heavily on ground turmeric, in turn producing a very yellow sauce.
  3. Garden fresh mixed vegetables cooked in a tangy, hot curry sauce. (Web site)
  4. Common spices included in curry blends include tumeric, black or white pepper, red pepper, and coriander.
  5. A favourite Pakistani curry is Karahi, either mutton or chicken cooked in a dry sauce.

Categories

  1. Architecture > Home > Cooking > Foods
  2. Places > World > Countries > Malaysia
  3. World > Countries > United Kingdom > England
  4. Golden Triangle Tour > India
  5. Places > World > Countries > Japan

Subcategories

Korma
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  Short phrases about "Curry"
  Originally created: April 28, 2008.
  Links checked: March 26, 2013.
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