KeyWEn.com  
 
 
 
Daughter Cells       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Cell Division > Daughter Cells   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
PARENT CELLS
IDENTICAL DAUGHTER CELLS
FOUR DAUGHTER CELLS
NUCLEUS
COPIES
HALF
SEPARATE
FORM
NUMBER
DIVIDING
SPECIFIC FUNCTION
DNA
MITOCHONDRIA
STEM CELLS
EPENDYMAL CELLS
FERTILIZED EGG
CELL WALL
YEASTS
SINGLE CELL
ASEXUAL REPRODUCTION
CELL DIVISION
PROCESS
NEWLY
DIVISION
PLANT CELLS
MEIOSIS
METAPHASE
CELLS
CELL
HAPLOID
PARENT CELL
BINARY FISSION
MITOSIS
GENETICALLY IDENTICAL
CHROMOSOMES
CYTOKINESIS
DAUGHTER CELLS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Daughter Cells"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Four daughter cells are created that emerge from the enclosing parent cell as spores. (Web site)
  2. Once the daughter cells are mature, they bud out of the remnants of the mother cell. (Web site)
  3. Each of the daughter cells is now haploid (23 chromosomes), but each chromosome has two chromatids. (Web site)

Parent Cells

  1. During embryological development this parent cells grew and matured into a series of daughter cells.

Identical Daughter Cells

  1. The cell then divides in cytokinesis, to produce two identical daughter cells. (Web site)

Four Daughter Cells

  1. Nuclear envelopes reform and cleavage or cell wall formation eventually produces a total of four daughter cells, each with a haploid set of chromosomes. (Web site)

Nucleus

  1. This is followed by a division of the whole protoplasmic mass of the cell; two daughter cells are thus formed, each containing a nucleus.

Copies

  1. Some kinds of plasmids contain genes that help make sure copies are efficiently passed on to both daughter cells when the host cell divides. (Web site)
  2. During the normal two rounds of cell division, these copies are partitioned two apiece among the four daughter cells. (Web site)

Half

  1. Eventually, the mother cell will be split in half, giving rise to two daughter cells, each with an equivalent and complete copy of the original genome.

Separate

  1. Finally, the chromosomes must separate from each other and migrate in each of the daughter cells.

Form

  1. Some bacteria, while still reproducing asexually, form more complex reproductive structures that help disperse the newly-formed daughter cells. (Web site)
  2. During mitosis, a cell duplicates all of its contents, including its chromosomes, and splits to form two identical daughter cells.
  3. Some bacteria, while still reproducing asexually, form more complex reproductive structures that facilitate the dispersal of the newly-formed daughter cells. (Web site)

Number

  1. The four daughter cells that are produced are each haploid, having only half the number of chromosomes as the original diploid cell.

Dividing

  1. Anucleated cells contain no nucleus and are therefore incapable of dividing to produce daughter cells. (Web site)

Specific Function

  1. Therefore, a mother cell with a specific function (for instance, interpreting visual information) would create daughter cells with similar functions. (Web site)

Dna

  1. This produces four daughter cells, each with half the DNA of the original. (Web site)

Mitochondria

  1. As they cannot be synthesized de novo and are self-replicating, mitochondria must be transferred from mother to daughter cells. (Web site)

Stem Cells

  1. The stem cells give rise to daughter cells that ultimately develop into B-cells or T-cells. (Web site)

Ependymal Cells

  1. The ependymal cells continue their mitotic activities, and daughter cells produce a middle mantle layer that develops into the gray matter. (Web site)

Fertilized Egg

  1. In addition, the two daughter cells that remain after a fertilized egg undergoes its first division may separate and divide independently of each other.

Cell Wall

  1. The latter stimulate production of the cell wall as a bacterium readies for division into two daughter cells. (Web site)

Yeasts

  1. Yeasts are fungi that grow as single cells, producing daughter cells either by budding (the budding yeasts) or by binary fission (the fission yeasts). (Web site)

Single Cell

  1. Cytokinesis is the process whereby the cytoplasm of a single cell is divided to spawn two daughter cells. (Web site)

Asexual Reproduction

  1. The division of a bacteria l cell into two daughter cells is an example of asexual reproduction. (Web site)

Cell Division

  1. Cell division involves a single cell (called a mother cell) dividing into two daughter cells.
  2. At cell division, mitochondria are distributed to the daughter cells more or less randomly by partitioning of the cytoplasm when the cell divides. (Web site)
  3. Bacterial chromosome replication results in duplication of genomic DNA for separation into daughter cells during cell division. (Web site)

Process

  1. For 10 points, name this process of dividing a cell's cytoplasm to form two daughter cells.

Newly

  1. Some bacteria, while still reproducing asexually, form more complex reproductive structures that help disperse the newly formed daughter cells.
  2. The cell membrane then invaginates (grows inwards) and splits the cell into two daughter cells, separated by a newly grown cell plate.
  3. In one, the division is completely asymmetric in that all newly synthesized components go to one of the daughter cells, and all older ones to the other.

Division

  1. At cell division, mitochondria are distributed to the daughter cells more or less randomly during the division of the cytoplasm. (Web site)
  2. The division of a bacterial cell into two daughter cells is an example of asexual reproduction.
  3. Mitochondrial inheritance is tightly coupled with bud emergence, ensuring that daughter cells receive mitochondria from mother cells during division.

Plant Cells

  1. In plant cells, the daughter cells will construct a new dividing cell wall between each other. (Web site)

Meiosis

  1. The diploid cell then divides producing daughter cells with half the parent cell's genetic material - this process is called meiosis.

Metaphase

  1. Metaphase is a critical transition in the cell cycle because it is after this stage that chromosomes segregate to daughter cells.

Cells

  1. Once these cells begin the process of cell division, their daughter cells can be identified by examination of post-mortem brain tissue.
  2. Meiosis therefore results in four daughter cells rather than the two cells formed by mitosis. (Web site)
  3. In some organisms, like chlorella and Chlamydomonas one cell divides into four daughter cells, or under cells, or undergoes multiple fission. (Web site)

Cell

  1. During this process, one cell divides into two daughter cells with the development of a transverse cell wall. (Web site)
  2. The plasma membrane then invaginates (grows inwards) and splits the cell into two daughter cells through a process called cytokinesis. (Web site)
  3. If it is desired that the transfected gene actually remains in the genome of the cell and its daughter cells, a stable transfection must occur. (Web site)

Haploid

  1. Meiosis II consists of decoupling each chromosome's sister strands (chromatids), and segregating the individual chromatids into haploid daughter cells. (Web site)
  2. Meiosis II separates the chromatids producing two daughter cells each with 23 chromosomes (haploid), and each chromosome has only one chromatid. (Web site)
  3. Anaphase II, Telophase II and cytokinesis, four daughter cells are now formed and are haploid [ Topics] 5.

Parent Cell

  1. A parent cell can divide into two daughter cells by central constriction and formation of a new cell wall.
  2. If the parent cell is haploid (N), then the daughter cells will be haploid.

Binary Fission

  1. Binary Fission: Process of cell division in prokaryotes, such as yeasts where the cell devides into two daughter cells. (Web site)
  2. Bacterial growth is the division of one bacterium into two daughter cells in a process called binary fission.
  3. In binary fission, one bacterial cell divides into two daughter cells with the development of a transverse cell wall. (Web site)

Mitosis

  1. Mitosis is nuclear division plus cytokinesis, and produces two identical daughter cells during prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase. (Web site)
  2. M phase or mitosis and cytokinesis, the actual division of the cell into two daughter cells.
  3. The primary result of mitosis is the division of the parent cell's genome into two daughter cells. (Web site)

Genetically Identical

  1. Since there is no fusion of two different cells, the daughter cells produced by asexual reproduction are genetically identical to the parent cell. (Web site)
  2. Asexual reproduction occurs when a single cell divides to form two daughter cells that are genetically identical to the parent cell.

Chromosomes

  1. The result is the formation of two new daughter cells whose nuclei have the same number and kind of chromosomes as the parent. (Web site)
  2. Diploid organisms form haploids by dividing, without replicating their DNA, to create daughter cells that randomly inherit one of each pair of chromosomes. (Web site)
  3. Meiosis results in four rather than two daughter cells, each with a haploid set of chromosomes. (Web site)

Cytokinesis

  1. The process of mitosis ends after the nuclei have reformed and the cell membrane begins to separate the cell into two daughter cells, during cytokinesis.
  2. The separation of daughter cells from each other is a process known as cytokinesis, and is separate from mitosis. (Web site)
  3. At the end of nuclear division in the budding yeast, acto-myosin ring contraction and cytokinesis occur between mother and daughter cells.

Daughter Cells

  1. Meiosis is the process in which a cell divides into four cells and the number of chromosomes in the daughter cells is half the number in the parent cell. (Web site)
  2. Mitosis: The process of nuclear division in cells that produces daughter cells that are genetically identical to each other and to the parent cell. (Web site)
  3. Step through prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase as the chromosomes slowly condense, align, and divide before being segregated into daughter cells.

Categories

  1. Cell Division
  2. Single Cell
  3. Cell Cycle > Cytokinesis
  4. Genetically Identical
  5. Chromosomes
  6. Books about "Daughter Cells" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Daughter Cells"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Links checked: January 15, 2013.
  Please send us comments and questions by this Online Form
  Please click on Move Up to move good phrases up.
0.0157 sec. a=1..