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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Hyphae > Dikaryotic   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
DIKARYOTIC MYCELIUM
FUNGUS
BINUCLEATE
DIKARYOTIC STAGE
MONOKARYOTIC HYPHAE
DIKARYOTIC MYCELIUM FORMS
FORM DIKARYOTIC HYPHAE
SECONDARY MYCELIUM
DIKARYOTIC MYCELIA
UNIQUE
NUCLEUS
DIFFERENT SPECIES
PLANT
MATING
NUCLEI
CELL DIVISION
HYPHA
ASCOGONIUM
PLASMOGAMY
LIFE CYCLE
ASCOCARPS
DIKARYON
BASIDIOMYCOTA
BASIDIOSPORES
SEPTA
DIPLOID
BASIDIA
FRUITING BODY
BASIDIOMYCETES
HAPLOID NUCLEI
KARYOGAMY
MYCELIUM
DIKARYOTIC HYPHAE
HYPHAE
DIKARYOTIC
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Dikaryotic"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Dikaryotic Mycelium

  1. Dikaryotic mycelium is formed by the fusion of monokaryotic hyphae from different mating types. (Web site)
  2. Two main ones, dikaryotic mycelium and a basidium for a meoisporangium, have been discussed above. (Web site)
  3. Due to the vigorous, rapidly propagating character of dikaryotic mycelium, outgrowth of a dikaryon from a cross of compatible monokaryons is easily detected.

Fungus

  1. Four to six weeks later, the hyphae become dikaryotic, develop clamp connections and the fungus grows saprophytically [ 5].
  2. UREDINIOSPORES - the dikaryotic `summer spores' of Uredinales, which spread the fungus from plant to plant of the primary host during the growing season. (Web site)

Binucleate

  1. Therefore all subsequent cells of the hyphae are binucleate (dikaryotic). (Web site)

Dikaryotic Stage

  1. This process does not involve formation of a fusion cell, and a dikaryotic stage may persist for a while before karyogamy occurs.

Monokaryotic Hyphae

  1. Sexual reproduction begins when monokaryotic hyphae of two different mating types meet and fuse to form a dikaryotic (n + n) mycelium. (Web site)

Dikaryotic Mycelium Forms

  1. When the environment is appropriate the dikaryotic mycelium forms a compact mass and swells producing the fruiting body.

Form Dikaryotic Hyphae

  1. Form dikaryotic hyphae and basidia. (Web site)

Secondary Mycelium

  1. The tertiary mycelium, which is also dikaryotic, arises directly from the secondary mycelium, and forms the basidiocarp. (Web site)

Dikaryotic Mycelia

  1. The dikaryotic mycelia are long-lived, generally producing a new crop of basidiocarp each year.

Unique

  1. The dikaryotic phase of the fungal life cycle is unique. (Web site)

Nucleus

  1. In most dinoflagellates, the nucleus is dikaryotic throughout the entire life cycle. (Web site)
  2. The secondary mycelium consists of dikaryotic cells, one nucleus from each of the parent mycelia.

Different Species

  1. The different species of Alnicola exhibit unique morphological (cystidia, pileipellis) and cytological (dikaryotic or monokaryotic hyphae) characters.

Plant

  1. These spores arise from dikaryotic hyphae that grow systemically within the plant host without causing any sign of disease.

Mating

  1. A mating reaction was observed in one of the four genospecies, which produced one-celled basidia on dikaryotic hyphae with clamp connections. (Web site)

Nuclei

  1. DIKARYOTIC - having two separate but compatible nuclei in each cell or compartment; a nuclear condition unique to the fungi.
  2. Two other dikaryotic mycelia are generated at the outward sides of the two monokaryons after migration of nuclei through the opposite mycelium (58, 158).

Cell Division

  1. As the ascocarp hyphae develop, cell division occurs in such a way that the resulting cells are "dikaryotic" (ie.

Hypha

  1. The two nuclei in the terminal cell (ascus) of each dikaryotic hypha undergoes karyogamy producing a diploid nucleus.

Ascogonium

  1. The ascogonium grows hyphae with dikaryotic cells.

Plasmogamy

  1. After plasmogamy of hyphae from unlike strains, a dikaryotic hypha produces more filaments by mitosis. (Web site)
  2. When two homokaryotic hyphae of different mating compatibility groups fuse with one another, they form a dikaryotic mycelia in a process called plasmogamy.
  3. The fusion cells (the results of plasmogamy) produce the dikaryotic ascogenous hyphae which produce the hymenium consisting of many asci.

Life Cycle

  1. The life cycle of a club fungus usually includes a long-lived dikaryotic mycelium. (Web site)
  2. After a period of time and under the appropriate environmental conditions, the dikaryotic mycelia may enter the reproductive stage of the life cycle. (Web site)
  3. Produce dikaryotic cells during the life cycle.

Ascocarps

  1. These studies proceed from the assumption that the ascocarps are diploid (dikaryotic) structures. (Web site)
  2. Asci are special reproductive structures which are formed on special fertile layers of dikaryotic hyphae with in the Ascocarps.

Dikaryon

  1. The hook-shaped tip, reminiscent of a bishop's crozier, of the ascogenous (see ASCOGONIUM) dikaryotic (see DIKARYON) hypha.

Basidiomycota

  1. In many basidiomycota there is a rather elaborate mechanism for ensuring that the dikaryotic condition is maintained during growth of the hyphae.

Basidiospores

  1. Nine isolates produced dikaryotic filaments with paired nuclei, fused clamp connections, and basidiospores.

Septa

  1. Both groups have cells which are separated by septa (walls), and both have a dikaryotic phase in their life cycle; a phase with two haploid nuclei per cell.
  2. The coenocytic ascogonium extends hyphae that are partitioned by septa into dikaryotic cells, each with two haploid nuclei representing two parents. (Web site)

Diploid

  1. In contrast, True fungi hyphae are haploid from spore 2 and become dikaryotic - not diploid - on mating. (Web site)
  2. The fungal life cycle is somewhat complex; all true fungi go through a haploid (1n) stage, a diploid (2n) stage, and a dikaryotic (n+n) stage. (Web site)
  3. The hyphae in a mushroom are (A) diploid; (B) dikaryotic; (C) monokaryotic.

Basidia

  1. Later, Delgado and Cook [ 23] showed that the hyphae found in basidiomata are dikaryotic whereas basidia are monokaryotic (i.e.
  2. Basidiomycota are characterized by the presence of basidia and dikaryotic fruiting bodies and include the mushrooms, puffballs, and shelf fungi. (Web site)
  3. Dikaryotic filaments, basidia, and basidiospores were visible in crosses involving gpg1, but not gpg2 or gpg1 gpg2 mutants.

Fruiting Body

  1. The fusion of mycelium from two different mating types leads to the production of a fruiting body ("basidiocarp) which is dikaryotic (n+n).
  2. In the Ascomycota, the dikaryotic phase is limited to mycelium within the fruiting body (ascocarp).
  3. The only dikaryotic structures in the fruiting body are those produced by the gametangia after plasmogamy. (Web site)

Basidiomycetes

  1. Both basidiomycetes and ascomycetes, sister groups to each other, have septate hyphae and a dikaryotic stage.
  2. However, the dikaryotic phase is more extensive in the basidiomycetes, in many cases also present in the vegetatively growing mycelium. (Web site)

Haploid Nuclei

  1. Hyphae growing in the plant are dikaryotic; they possess two haploid nuclei per hyphal compartment. (Web site)
  2. The secondary mycelium is dikaryotic, in that it has two haploid nuclei, one from each parent.
  3. In the kingdom Fungi, the mycelium has one haploid nucleus per cell (only one set of chromosomes) or is dikaryotic (two haploid nuclei per cell). (Web site)

Karyogamy

  1. The teliospores are initially dikaryotic but become diploid via karyogamy.
  2. No dikaryotic phase is developed in most species because karyogamy takes place immediately after plasmogamy.
  3. Karyogamy takes place in the young ascus soon after the septa are formed in the hook, thus ending the dikaryotic phase.

Mycelium

  1. In basidiomycetes, two hyphae fuse to form a dikaryotic mycelium (a mycelium in which both nuclei remain distinct).
  2. A mushroom is a familiar basidiocarp that can pop up overnight as it absorbs water and as cytoplasm steams in from the dikaryotic mycelium. (Web site)
  3. As the dikaryotic mycelium grows, the cells divide and more septa are formed between the new cells.

Dikaryotic Hyphae

  1. Croziers resemble and function similarly to clamp connections on the dikaryotic hyphae of Basidiomycota.
  2. Plasmogamy between two unlike hyphae is followed by mitosis and the growth of dikaryotic hyphae. (Web site)
  3. When pairs of compatible K. mangroviensis strains are co-cultured on CMA medium, dikaryotic hyphae with clamp connections and basidia are produced [55]. (Web site)

Hyphae

  1. Mating resulted in the production of dikaryotic hyphae with fused clamp connections, basidia with cruciate septa, and basidiospores. (Web site)
  2. The two join (plasmogamy) and produce a series of binucleate, dikaryotic hyphae that reach above the ground and form the fruiting body or basidioma.
  3. Basidiomycetes possess dikaryotic hyphae with two nuclei, one of each mating type. (Web site)

Dikaryotic

  1. Be able to define these terms: hyphae, mycelium, coenocytic, septa, dikaryotic, monokaryotic.
  2. In this mycelium, many hyphae branch through asexual reproduction, but some of the hyphae may go through plasmogamy to become dikaryotic. (Web site)
  3. Most basidiomycetes live out most of their life as dikaryotic (heterokaryotic) mycelium, with karyogamy and meiosis happening in the basidium. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Hyphae
  2. Mycelium
  3. Karyogamy
  4. Haploid Nuclei
  5. Basidiomycetes
  6. Books about "Dikaryotic" in Amazon.com

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  Short phrases about "Dikaryotic"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Links checked: March 13, 2013.
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