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Djibouti       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Places > Earth > Continents > Africa > Djibouti   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
DJIBOUTI
HORN
ERITREA
STRATEGIC LOCATION
FRENCH
PORT
LANDMINES
YEMEN
RED SEA
EXPORTS
IMPORTS
MINE
ADDIS
ETHIOPIA
SOMALI
AFAR
FRANCE
ISLAM
SALT
CAPITAL
INVESTMENT
SHIPPING
DJIBOUTI CITY
FRANC
ANTIPERSONNEL
TOOK OVER
ASSISTANCE
NEIGHBORING
ARABIAN PENINSULA
FOREIGN LEGION
CROSSROADS
BASE
ETHIOPIAN
REMAINDER
LIMITED
OFFICIALLY
INDEPENDENCE
CIVIL WAR
GUELLEH
MILITARY BASES
REAL
TRANSIT
PRIVATIZATION
BANKING
SOMALIA
RELIGION
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Djibouti"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Djibouti is a one party dominant state with the People's Rally for Progress in power. (Web site)
  2. Djibouti is a developing African country. (Web site)
  3. Djibouti is a republic with a strong presidency and a weak legislature. (Web site)
  4. Djibouti is a republic with a strong central government and a democratic constitution, which was adopted in 1992.
  5. Djibouti is a Horn of Africa country that borders Eritrea, Ethiopia and Somalia. (Web site)

Djibouti

  1. In 2000, after 3 years of insufficient rain, 50,000 drought victims entered Djibouti.
  2. A weekly train from Ethiopia brings in most of Djibouti's fresh fruits and vegetables.
  3. A lot of Djibouti's original art is passed on and preserved orally, mainly through song. (Web site)
  4. In March 2006, the Governments of Ethiopia and Djibouti (which co-own the railway) selected the South African firm COMAZAR to manage the line.
  5. In 1992 a constitution allowing for a limited multiparty state was approved by Djibouti's voters. (Web site)

Horn

  1. Djibouti lies in a hot, arid area of the Horn of Africa. (Web site)
  2. The Republic of Djibouti (جيبوتي) is a country in eastern Africa, located in the Horn of Africa. (Web site)
  3. While Djibouti is not a large area of the Greater Horn, it does play a significant role of the well being of the entire area.
  4. Zeila is in Somalia and Djibouti is a country in the Horn of Africa.
  5. The nearest French base is in Djibouti, a former French colony in the Horn of Africa.

Eritrea

  1. Business soared at the Port of Djibouti when hostilities between Eritrea and Ethiopia denied Ethiopia access to the Eritrean Port of Assab.
  2. Djibouti shares a 113- km border with Eritrea, 337 km with Ethiopia and 58 km with Somaliland (total 506 km). (Web site)
  3. Aside from a two-year break in relations from 1998-2000, Djibouti has maintained a cordial relationship with Eritrea.
  4. Eritrea is bordered by the Sudan on the north and west, the Red Sea on the north and east, and Ethiopia and Djibouti on the south. (Web site)
  5. Djibouti [1] is in East Africa, bordered by Eritrea to the north, Ethiopia to the west and south, and Somalia to the southeast. (Web site)

Strategic Location

  1. Djibouti's economy is based on a number of service activities associated with its strategic location and its position as a free-trade zone. (Web site)
  2. French interest centered around Djibouti, the French commercial rival to Aden. (Web site)
  3. The economy of Djibouti is based on service activities connected with the country's strategic location and status as a free trade zone in northeast Africa.
  4. In 2000, Jebel Ali Port Managers, which manages the Port of Dubai, took over management of Djibouti's port.
  5. Djibouti's most important economic asset is its strategic location on the busy shipping route between the Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean.

French

  1. Free French and the Allied forces recaptured Djibouti at the end of 1942. (Web site)
  2. Djibouti has two official languages, French and Arabic. (Web site)
  3. There are some 3,000 French troops stationed in Djibouti, including units of the famed French Foreign Legion.
  4. Djibouti enjoys a stable political climate, thanks in part to the large French military presence based in country.
  5. It is advisable to have any label or marking in French, which is widely understood in Djibouti.

Port

  1. The city of Djibouti is the terminus of the Addis Ababa-Djibouti RR; it and the port were modernized beginning in the late 1990s.
  2. Djibouti has allowed the U.S. military, as well as other nations, access to its port and airport facilities. (Web site)
  3. Djibouti provides services as both a transit port for the region and an international transshipment and refueling center. (Web site)
  4. As a result, the Port of Djibouti has increased its efficiency and is positioned to be a major port and transshipment port for the Red Sea.
  5. The city of Djibouti has the only paved airport in the republic.

Landmines

  1. Djibouti has a small landmine problem, which is the legacy of a three-year internal war during 1991-1994.
  2. In May 2002, a Djibouti official told Landmine Monitor, “Information regarding stockpiles is held by the military. (Web site)

Yemen

  1. On the other side of the Red Sea, on the Arabian Peninsula, 20 km from the coast of Djibouti, is Yemen. (Web site)
  2. Continuing instability in Somalia and Yemen present the potential for internal unrest in Djibouti, which has large ethnic Somali and Yemeni populations.
  3. On the other side of the Red Sea, on the Arabian Peninsula, 20 kilometers (12 mi) from the coast of Djibouti, is Yemen. (Web site)
  4. Politically, this includes most of Somalia, all of Djibouti, parts of Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Yemen and Oman, and a small piece of far eastern Sudan.

Red Sea

  1. On the other side of the Red Sea, on the Arabian Peninsula, 20 kilometres (12  mi) from the coast of Djibouti, is Yemen. (Web site)
  2. As a result, the Port of Djibouti has increased its efficiency and is positioned to be a major port and transshipment port for the Red Sea. (Web site)
  3. It is bordered on the northeast by the Red Sea, on the southeast by Djibouti, on the south by Ethiopia, and on the northwest by Sudan. (Web site)
  4. Djibouti is bordered by Eritrea in the north, Ethiopia in the west and south, and Somaliland in the southeast. (Web site)
  5. Djibouti lies in northeast Africa on the Gulf of Aden at the southern entrance to the Red Sea. (Web site)

Exports

  1. Djibouti itself has few exports, and the majority of its imports come from France.
  2. In 2001, U.S. exports to Djibouti totaled $18.7 million, while U.S. imports from Djibouti were about $1 million.
  3. Principal exports from the region transiting Djibouti are coffee, salt, hides, dried beans, cereals, other agricultural products, wax, and salt. (Web site)
  4. The capital, Djibouti city, handles Ethiopian imports and exports. (Web site)

Imports

  1. Imports and exports from landlocked neighbor Ethiopia represent 85% of port activity at Djibouti's container terminal. (Web site)
  2. In 1999, U.S. exports to Djibouti totaled $26.7 million while U.S. imports from Djibouti were less than $100,000.
  3. Most imports are consumed in Djibouti and the remainder goes to Ethiopia and Somaliland.

Mine

  1. The U.S. is funding mine action in Djibouti.
  2. Djibouti signed the Mine Ban Treaty on 3 December 1997 and ratified it on 18 May 1998. (Web site)
  3. No systematic mine surveys have been carried out in Djibouti and no reliable data are available on the extent of mine contamination.

Addis

  1. Its main economic activities are the Port of Djibouti, the banking sector, the airport, and the operation of the Addis Ababa-Djibouti railroad.
  2. The Republic of Djibouti (جيبوتي) is a country in eastern Africa, located in the Horn of Africa. (Web site)
  3. A railway was built to connect Djibouti with the Ethiopian backcountry, reaching Dire Dawa in 1903 and Addis Ababa in 1917.
  4. The city of Djibouti is the terminus of the Addis Ababa---Djibouti RR; it and the port were modernized beginning in the late 1990s. (Web site)

Ethiopia

  1. Djibouti is bordered by Eritrea in the north, Ethiopia in the west and south, and Somalia in the southeast. (Web site)
  2. A weekly train from Ethiopia brings in most of Djibouti's fresh fruits and vegetables.
  3. Business increased at Djibouti port when hostilities between Eritrea and Ethiopia denied Ethiopia access to the Eritrean port of Assab.
  4. Visitors to Djibouti must obtain a visa before arrival. (Web site)
  5. In addition, large numbers of refugees from Ethiopian civil wars settled in Djibouti from 1975 to 1991. (Web site)

Somali

  1. French President Charles de Gaulle's August 1966 visit to Djibouti was marked by 2 days of public demonstrations by Somalis demanding independence. (Web site)
  2. In the summer of 2000, Djibouti hosted the Arta Conference which brought together various Somali clans and warlords.

Afar

  1. By mid-1992 Afar rebels controlled two-thirds of Djibouti---s territory.
  2. In late 1991 rebels from the Afar ethnic group occupied the two northern districts of Djibouti. (Web site)
  3. The Afar are a people of East Africa from about 1.075 million of them in Ethiopia, 445 000 in Eritrea and 310 000 in Djibouti. (Web site)
  4. The area of Djibouti has been occupied by several tribes, currently the Afar, Issa and Somali. (Web site)

France

  1. France maintains one of its largest military bases outside France in Djibouti. (Web site)
  2. Djibouti's military and economic agreements with France provide continued security and economic assistance. (Web site)
  3. Djibouti remains extremely dependent on foreign assistance, and almost all food and other goods must be imported. (Web site)
  4. The reduction in French forces stationed in Djibouti is a reflection of the reduced emphasis that France is currently placing on its role in Africa. (Web site)
  5. On 8 April 2011, the Republic of Djibouti held its third Presidential election since gaining independence from France in 1977.

Islam

  1. Djibouti's main religion is Islam. (Web site)
  2. The most famous sacred space for Islam in Djibouti is the tomb of Sheikh Abu Yazid, found in the Goda Mountains.
  3. Just like Islam in other countries, every town and village in Djibouti has a mosque, to which people go to worship.
  4. Djibouti's state religion is Islam. (Web site)
  5. Islam in Djibouti has a long history, first appearing in East Africa during the lifetime of Muhammad.

Salt

  1. Principal exports from the region transiting Djibouti are coffee, salt, hides, dried beans, cereals, other agricultural products, and wax. (Web site)
  2. This salt has traditionally been traded with people surrounding Djibouti, such as Ethiopians, Somalis and others. (Web site)

Capital

  1. The capital of Djibouti is the city of Djibouti. (Web site)
  2. The administrative capital was moved from Obock to Djibouti in 1896. (Web site)
  3. It is bounded by Eritrea (N), Ethiopia (W, S), Somalia (S), and the Gulf of Aden (E). Djibouti is the capital, largest city, and most significant port. (Web site)
  4. However, from 2001 on, Djibouti has become a magnet for private sector capital investment, attracting inflows that now average more than $200 million.
  5. The capital and largest city of Djibouti, in the southeast part of the country on an inlet of the Gulf of Aden. (Web site)

Investment

  1. Djibouti has no laws that would discourage incoming foreign investment.
  2. However, from 2001 on, Djibouti has become a magnet for private sector capital investment, attracting inflows that now average more than $200 million.
  3. Djibouti welcomes foreign private investment. (Web site)

Shipping

  1. Djibouti's most important economic asset is its strategic location on the busy shipping route between the Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean.
  2. Djibouti charges these countries fees for shipping their goods for them. (Web site)

Djibouti City

  1. Djibouti has few natural resources and little industry. (Web site)
  2. In 2000, after 3 years of insufficient rain, 50,000 drought victims entered Djibouti.
  3. Persons violating the laws of Djibouti, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.
  4. A lot of Djibouti's original art is passed on and preserved orally, mainly through song. (Web site)
  5. Police occasionally stop travelers on the main roads leading out of Djibouti City to check identity documents.

Franc

  1. The fixed exchange rate is 177.71 Djibouti francs to the dollar.
  2. The Djibouti franc, which has been pegged to the U.S. dollar since 1949, is stable.
  3. The Djiboutian franc is a currency used in the African nation of Djibouti. (Web site)

Antipersonnel

  1. Djibouti has never produced or exported antipersonnel mines. (Web site)
  2. In November 1999 the French military stationed in Djibouti destroyed its stockpile of 2,444 antipersonnel landmines. (Web site)

Took Over

  1. In 2000, Dubai Ports World took over management of Djibouti's port and later its customs and airport operations.
  2. In 2000, Jebel Ali Port Mangers, who manage the port of Dubai, took over management of Djibouti-s port.

Assistance

  1. Djibouti receives approximately $100 million in donor assistance yearly.
  2. Djibouti remains extremely dependent on foreign assistance, and almost all food and other goods must be imported. (Web site)
  3. Djibouti's military and economic agreements with France provide continued security and economic assistance. (Web site)

Neighboring

  1. Despite its attempts at peacemaking, Djibouti has been adversely affected by warfare in and between neighboring Ethiopia and Somalia. (Web site)
  2. The government, in order to fight increasing contraband from neighboring countries, has requested importers to pre-label cigarettes destined for Djibouti.
  3. Civil unrest or armed conflict in neighboring countries could disrupt air travel to and from Djibouti or otherwise negatively affect its security situation.

Arabian Peninsula

  1. On the other side of the Red Sea, on the Arabian Peninsula, 20 kilometres (12  mi) from the coast of Djibouti, is Yemen. (Web site)
  2. Strategically situated, Djibouti commands Bab el Mandeb, the strait between the Gulf of Aden and the Red Sea. (Web site)
  3. Catha edulis appears to have originated in Ethiopia.[ 3] It spread early on to Somalia, Djibouti, Eritrea and the Arabian Peninsula.

Foreign Legion

  1. There are some 3,000 French troops stationed in Djibouti, including units of the famed French Foreign Legion.
  2. In 1998 French Foreign Legion technicians assisted Djibouti-s military with the destruction of 350 kilograms of landmines and unexploded ordnance.

Crossroads

  1. Culture of Djibouti - The Republic of Djibouti is ethnically diverse, due to its strategic location at the crossroads of trade and commerce. (Web site)
  2. The Port of Djibouti is strategically located at the crossroads of sea routes between the Far East, the Arabo-Persian Gulf and Africa.

Base

  1. Djibouti currently hosts the only United States military base in sub-Saharan Africa and is a front-line state in the global war on terrorism. (Web site)
  2. Djibouti---s merchandise trade balance has been in large deficit, driven by the country's enormous need for imports and narrow base of exports. (Web site)
  3. In the end, the United States opted for a base in Djibouti instead. (Web site)
  4. The Pentagon is using Djibouti as a base to strike Al Qaeda cells in the region and as a desert warfare training ground.

Ethiopian

  1. Approximately 2,500 Ethiopian and Somali urban refugees were registered with the UNHCR office in Djibouti City.
  2. Djibouti's economy depends largely on its proximity to the large Ethiopian market and a large foreign expatriate community.

Remainder

  1. Most imports are consumed in Djibouti, and the remainder goes to Ethiopia and northwestern Somalia.
  2. Two-thirds of Djibouti's inhabitants live in the capital city; the remainder are mostly nomadic herders. (Web site)
  3. The bulk of Djibouti's people are urban residents; the remainder are herders. (Web site)
  4. Djibouti is very active in the fight against terrorism. (Web site)
  5. Most imports are consumed in Djibouti, and the remainder go to Ethiopia and northwestern Somalia.

Limited

  1. With few natural resources, Djibouti's industry is mainly limited to food processing, construction, and shipbuilding and repair. (Web site)
  2. The local Chamber of Commerce may only provide limited information on firms operating in Djibouti.
  3. Due to the limited amount of natural resources, small amount of industry, and the limited crop production, Djibouti has to import most of its food.
  4. In 1992 a constitution allowing for a limited multiparty state was approved by Djibouti's voters. (Web site)
  5. Modern tourist facilities and communications links are limited in Djibouti and are virtually non-existent outside the capital.

Officially

  1. France officially recognized Djibouti's independence in 1977. (Web site)
  2. Djibouti , officially Republic of Djibouti, republic (2005 est. (Web site)

Independence

  1. Djibouti has been the host country for French military units since independence. (Web site)
  2. The electorate voted for independence in a May 1977 referendum, and the Republic of Djibouti was established June that same year. (Web site)
  3. France officially recognized Djibouti's independence in 1977. (Web site)
  4. The Republic of Djibouti is a former French colony, which gained its independence on 27 June 1977.
  5. French President Charles de Gaulle's August 1966 visit to Djibouti was marked by 2 days of public demonstrations by Somalis demanding independence.

Civil War

  1. In addition, large numbers of refugees from Ethiopian civil wars settled in Djibouti from 1975 to 1991. (Web site)
  2. Djibouti has its own armed forces, including a small army, which has grown significantly since the start of the civil war.

Guelleh

  1. Eritrea's President Isaias visited Djibouti in early 2001 and President Ismail Omar Guelleh made a reciprocal visit to Asmara in the early summer of 2001.
  2. The incumbent, Ismail Omar Guelleh, won Djibouti's presidential election in an uncontested race.

Military Bases

  1. France maintains one of its largest military bases outside France in Djibouti. (Web site)
  2. Djibouti currently hosts the only United States military base in sub-Saharan Africa and is a front-line state in the global war on terrorism.

Real

  1. Opposition parties are allowed, but have no real chance of gaining power ( see Elections in Djibouti). (Web site)
  2. Djibouti's real gross domestic product (GDP) is expected to grow 2.8% in 2003, following estimated growth of 2.4% in 2002, and 1.9% in 2001.

Transit

  1. Djibouti provides services as both a transit port for the region and an international transshipment and refueling center. (Web site)
  2. The possible transit of mines through Djibouti territory is a concern.
  3. Djibouti's unfavorable balance of trade is offset partially by invisible earnings such as transit taxes and harbor dues.

Privatization

  1. Djibouti Telecom, which is government owned, is slated for privatization.
  2. In addition Djibouti Telecom was handed to private management to prepare it for eventual privatization.

Banking

  1. The Central bank oversees Djibouti- s banking system.
  2. Djibouti has one of the most liberal economic regimes in Africa, with almost unrestricted banking and commerce sectors.
  3. Djibouti has become a significant regional banking hub, with approximately $600 million in dollar deposits.

Somalia

  1. Despite its attempts at peacemaking, Djibouti has been adversely affected by warfare in and between neighboring Ethiopia and Somalia. (Web site)
  2. Djibouti is greatly affected by events in Somalia and Ethiopia, so relations are important and, at times, delicate.
  3. The seven countries which are strategically located in the Horn of Africa are Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Sudan, Somalia and Uganda. (Web site)

Religion

  1. Djibouti's main religion is Islam. (Web site)
  2. The Muslim religion comprises 94 percent of Djibouti's population (about 444,440).

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