KeyWEn.com  
 
 
 
Drosophila       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Patterning > Drosophila   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
DROSOPHILA EGGSHELL PATTERNING
CIONA
MOSQUITO GENOME
FRUITFLY DROSOPHILA
DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER
RHEB
STUDIES
REGIONS
BEGINNING
NEGATIVE
COMPLEX
SIMILAR
MAMMALS
AMINO
CONTRAST
ANTERIOR
MORGAN
EVOLUTION
MAMMALIAN
ACTIVATION
KINASE
MUTANTS
WORK
CDNA
BRAIN
BRAIN FUNCTION
FORMATION
CLOT FORMATION
NEURONS
FIRST PHASE
RELATED SPECIES
EFFECT
CELL PROLIFERATION
REQUIRED
ELEGANS
DEVELOPMENT
CELLS
FUNCTION
SPERM
FRUIT
EMBRYO
SPECIES
ORGANISMS
GENE
GENES
INSECTS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Drosophila"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. In Drosophila, the IMD pathway is required for antimicrobial gene expression in response to gram-negative bacteria.
  2. In Drosophila, the effect of DNT1 mutations in the embryonic PNS is milder than in the CNS (unpublished data). (Web site)

Drosophila Eggshell Patterning

  1. Deng, W.-M. and Bownes, M. Two signalling pathways specify localised expression of the Broad-Complex in Drosophila eggshell patterning and morphogenesis.

Ciona

  1. In vertebrates three distinct Hh ligands are present, Ciona has two, and Drosophila and sea urchins each have only one.

Mosquito Genome

  1. When compared to Drosophila, the mosquito genome includes a specific duplication of TLL, but has lost Knirps. (Web site)

Fruitfly Drosophila

  1. For example, in the fruitfly Drosophila, the cellular circadian rhythm in neurons is controlled by two interlocked feedback loops.
  2. A study led by an EMBL senior scientist, Peer Bork compared the mosquito genome with that of the fruitfly Drosophila. (Web site)

Drosophila Melanogaster

  1. Most of the animals used in animal testing are invertebrates, especially Drosophila melanogaster, a fruit fly, and Caenorhabditis elegans, a nematode.

Rheb

  1. Rheb is an essential regulator of S6K in controlling cell growth in Drosophila. (Web site)
  2. Increased levels of Rheb in Drosophila melanogaster promote cell growth and alter cell cycle kinetics in multiple tissues. (Web site)

Studies

  1. Similar findings have also come from two new studies of cryptochrome proteins in the fruit fly Drosophila. (Web site)

Regions

  1. Considerable evidence has been obtained in Drosophila on the regions of the tropomyosin gene that regulates its expression (686, 689, 690, 788, 1064).

Beginning

  1. Beginning in 1907, Thomas Hunt Morgan extended Sutton's insights by conducting laboratory studies of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.
  2. Already at the beginning of this century geneticists had noted occasional malformations in Drosophila. (Web site)

Negative

  1. Unlike its close relative ethyl carbamate it is not mutagenic in salmonella (it tested negative in the Ames test), but it is mutagenic in Drosophila.

Complex

  1. In 1968, having decided against Drosophila melanogaster as too complex, Brenner chose Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism for study.

Similar

  1. Its size is similar to Drosophila melanogaster, (which belongs to a different family, the Drosophilidae), about 2 mm in length in adult stage.

Mammals

  1. Tuberin and hamartin function together as a complex in mammals and Drosophila.

Amino

  1. However, one amino acid substitution was found in comparison between land snails and Drosophila. (Web site)
  2. But in the mitochondria of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, it encodes the amino acid tryptophan. (Web site)

Contrast

  1. In contrast, further changes occurred in Drosophila, so that the neuroblast gave rise to the three distinct lobe groups. (Web site)

Anterior

  1. The gut epithelium of Drosophila is derived from the anterior and posterior primordia at both ends of the blastoderm embryo.

Morgan

  1. With this knowledge, Morgan and his students began the first chromosomal map of Drosophila.
  2. With this knowledge, Morgan and his students began the first chromosomal map of the fruit fly Drosophila.

Evolution

  1. The discussion incorporates the authors' own findings on the evolution of population stability in Drosophila. (Web site)

Mammalian

  1. It is an agonist specific to mammalian but not fruit fly (Drosophila) GABAB receptors.

Activation

  1. However, how Slit leads to the activation of Rac in either Drosophila or vertebrate systems is still unknown.
  2. Ghabrial, A. and Schupbach, T. (1999). Activation of a meiotic checkpoint regulates translation of Gurken during Drosophila oogenesis.

Kinase

  1. Interaction of eye protein kinase C and INAD in Drosophila. (Web site)

Mutants

  1. Clock genes have been identified in mammals, Drosophila, fungi, and cyanobacteria and their oscillatory mechanisms analyzed with studies of mutants.

Work

  1. Recent work on amphibian, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans embryos implicates membrane trafficking and delivery as essential for cytokinesis. (Web site)

Cdna

  1. One identified cDNA encodes a protein that exhibits highest sequence similarities to the replicase polyprotein of the Drosophila C virus.

Brain

  1. In Drosophila, cryptochrome (CRY) acts as a photoreceptor that mediates light input to circadian oscillators in both brain and peripheral tissue. (Web site)
  2. The identification of DNTs bridges a void in neuronal studies using Drosophila as a model for understanding the brain. (Web site)

Brain Function

  1. To accelerate the molecular analysis of brain function in Drosophila we constructed a cDNA library exclusively from adult brains. (Web site)

Formation

  1. Octopamine has recently been implicated in the formation of appetitive (sugar-reinforced) memories in Drosophila. (Web site)

Clot Formation

  1. This includes Drosophila where TG-activity can be detected in the clot and the enzyme contributes to clot formation [13],[14].

Neurons

  1. DNT1 shares structural similarity with all known neurotrophins and is a key factor in the fate of neurons in Drosophila. (Web site)
  2. Drosophila use the same type of asymmetric divisions to form their neurons. (Web site)
  3. By contrast, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has around 300,000 neurons (which do spike) and exhibits many complex behaviors. (Web site)

First Phase

  1. The first phase of migration in Drosophila occurs when the pole cells move passively and infold into the midgut invagination.

Related Species

  1. Using the tremendous advantages of comparative genomics in closely related species, we identified novel genes regulated by dRFX in Drosophila. (Web site)

Effect

  1. One known effect of cocaine on Drosophila is loss of “negative geotaxis,” or wall climbing, in response to startle.

Cell Proliferation

  1. In Drosophila, genes encoding proteasomal proteins are under developmental control and are involved in cell proliferation and morphogenesis (37).

Required

  1. The transcription factor E2F is required for S phase during Drosophila embryogenesis.

Elegans

  1. Additional data file 2 is a figure showing phylogenetic trees for the four main families of drug metabolizing enzymes for C. elegans, Drosophila and mouse.
  2. Often used model organisms for developmental biology are C. elegans and Drosophila melanogaster.
  3. The most thoroughly studied invertebrate brains, however, belong to the fruit fly Drosophila and the tiny roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans).

Development

  1. The homeobox gene mnx has been implicated in the development of motor neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, and chordates [ 72 ].
  2. Offering human, mouse and drosophila genome databases, a View&Search program and advanced products in development. (Web site)

Cells

  1. We found that the germline cyst in Xenopus contains 16 cells that are similar in general architecture and molecular composition to the cyst in Drosophila.

Function

  1. In Drosophila, CRY is a photoreceptor for the circadian clock where it binds to the clock component TIM in a light-dependent fashion and blocks its function.
  2. One research avenue in my lab is to understand the structure and function of the centrosome using Xenopus, Drosophila, and mammalian tissue culture cells.
  3. Drosophila (538, 613, 817, 1164) and C. elegans (21, 516, 1282) tropomyosin mutations alter muscle structure and function.

Sperm

  1. In Drosophila there are primary cilia and the sperm are flagellated, but their undulatory movement cannot be normal. (Web site)
  2. Drosophila melanogaster produces sperm that can be up to 1.8 mm in size. (Web site)

Fruit

  1. He worked with Thomas Hunt Morgan at Columbia University, who had pioneered the use of fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) in genetics experiments.

Embryo

  1. Nanos and Caudal are maternal effect genes that are important in the formation of more posterior abdominal segments of the Drosophila embryo. (Web site)
  2. Twelve maternal effect genes (the dorsal group and cactus) are required for the establishment of the embryonic dorsal-ventral axis in the Drosophila embryo. (Web site)
  3. Sequential gene expression divides the Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) embryo into regions and segments.

Species

  1. Identification of novel regulatory factor X (RFX) target genes by comparative genomics in Drosophila species. (Web site)
  2. Such an approach should be possible soon for the fruit fly, because an effort is under way to sequence the genome of another Drosophila species.
  3. Exemplary insect cells include any species of Spodoptera or Drosophila, including Drosophila S2 and Spodoptera Sf9. (Web site)

Organisms

  1. The gene vasa has been shown in Drosophila to encode an essential component of the germ plasm and is thought to have a similar function in other organisms. (Web site)
  2. Studies in Drosophila and other organisms have identified TSC signalling as a conserved pathway for growth control.

Gene

  1. The Drosophila embryo has been used with considerable success to unravel complex networks of gene activity.
  2. Pre-mRNAs of the Transformer (Tra) gene of Drosophila melanogaster undergo alternative splicing via the alternative acceptor site mode. (Web site)
  3. The modern theory of the gene comes from Thomas Hunt Morgan's study of the fruit fly Drosophila a hundred years ago. (Web site)

Genes

  1. With 10,000 genes, the genome of this tiny fungus is three-fourths the size of the Drosophila genome and one-third the size of the human genome. (Web site)
  2. Quantitative analysis of bristle number in Drosophila mutants identifies genes involved in neural development. (Web site)

Insects

  1. Its main focus is genomic and proteomics data for Drosophila and other insects. (Web site)
  2. Like in other insects, coagulation of Drosophila hemolymph is based on an interaction between humoral and cellular procoagulants [15].
  3. The high rate of chromosomal change also suggests a very limited transferability of the positional information from the Drosophila genome to other insects. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Patterning
  2. Nature > Life > Animals > Chordates
  3. Science > Biology > Genetics > Geneticists
  4. Information > Science > Biology > Genetics
  5. Homologous

Related Keywords

    * Antennae * Chordates * Embryos * Geneticists * Genetics * Homologous * Humans * Mesoderm * Patterning * Vertebrates
  1. Books about "Drosophila" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Drosophila"
  Originally created: August 01, 2010.
  Links checked: May 23, 2013.
  Please send us comments and questions by this Online Form
  Please click on Move Up to move good phrases up.
0.022 sec. a=1..