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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Blood Clot > Embolus   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
POINT
CHANCE
PARTICLE
CALL
FREE-FLOATING
PARADOXICAL EMBOLUS
CEREBELLUM MESALLY
LOOSE CLOT
LARGE EMBOLUS BREAKING
MOBILE
MEANING
HEPARIN
TRANSIENT
FORMING
TYPE
DANGEROUS
CORONARY ARTERY
FREE
TREATMENT
FATAL
CAUTION
MOVES
AREA
LOCATION
COMPLICATION
LIFE-THREATENING
PART
LOOSE
SYMPTOMS
OBSTRUCTION
RISK
ANTICOAGULATION
FAT
BLOCKED
PATIENT
OCCLUSION
SHORTNESS
VEINS
VEIN
ISCHEMIC STROKE
ARTERIES
BLOOD VESSELS
AORTA
INFERIOR VENA CAVA
BRAIN
HEART
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Embolus"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Embolus is a clot of blood that is formed in the body and then it travels to the brain by means of the different bloodstreams.
  2. An embolus is a clot that forms in one area of the body, travels through the bloodstream, and lodges in another vessel in the body.
  3. An embolus is a blockage of an artery in the lungs by fat, air, tumor tissue, or blood clot.
  4. An embolus is a blood clot that moves through the bloodstream until it lodges in a narrowed vessel and blocks circulation.
  5. An embolus is usually a blood clot, but may also be fat, air, or tumor cells that are in the blood stream.

Point

  1. The point of origin for the embolus can be the heart or a large blood vessel.

Chance

  1. If you are very ill, surgery to remove the embolus from your artery may be your only chance for survival. (Web site)
  2. They don't dissolve the clot, but they keep it from growing larger and they prevent the chance of a pulmonary embolus. (Web site)

Particle

  1. This can be due to ischemia, thrombus, embolus (a lodged particle) or hemorrhage (a bleed). (Web site)

Call

  1. If you suspect that there is an embolus, you should call an ambulance immediately. (Web site)

Free-Floating

  1. If a thrombus dislodges and becomes free-floating, it is an embolus.

Paradoxical Embolus

  1. This is known as a paradoxical embolus because the clot material paradoxially enters the arterial system instead of going to the lungs.

Cerebellum Mesally

  1. Embolus. A mass of grey matter in the cerebellum mesally of the nucleus dentatus. (Web site)

Loose Clot

  1. The loose clot is called an embolus. (Web site)

Large Embolus Breaking

  1. This may prevent a large embolus breaking off and travelling to the lungs (a pulmonary embolus).

Mobile

  1. If the clot becomes mobile and is carried away by the blood circulation, it is called an embolus. (Web site)

Meaning

  1. The word "embolus" comes from the Greek "embolos" meaning a wedge or plug.

Heparin

  1. Anticoagulant therapy (i.e., heparin) usually is given to prevent extension of the embolus. (Web site)

Transient

  1. Acute pulmonary embolus The following, often transient, changes may be seen in a large pulmonary embolus. (Web site)

Forming

  1. DVT treatment helps prevent a pulmonary embolus from forming and helps prevent another DVT. (Web site)

Type

  1. This type of blood clot is called an embolus.

Dangerous

  1. Emboli (EM-bo-ly; plural of embolus) are dangerous. (Web site)

Coronary Artery

  1. An embolus that blocks a coronary artery will cause a heart attack.
  2. If the traveling blood clot (known as an embolus) finds its way into a coronary artery, it can have similarly disastrous results.

Free

  1. When the thrombus breaks free of the valve leaflet, it is then called an embolus, and travels toward the heart and lungs.
  2. If that mechanism causes too much clotting, and the clot breaks free, an embolus is formed.

Treatment

  1. Hyperbaric Oxygen treatment is the definitive treatment, with similar rationale for the treatment of Air or gas embolus.
  2. Treatment of a deep venous thrombosis focuses on preventing a pulmonary embolus. (Web site)

Fatal

  1. A pulmonary embolus is a very serious condition that can be fatal if not recognized and treated promptly. (Web site)
  2. A blood clot in the lungs is known as a pulmonary embolus (PE) and can be fatal.
  3. A large pulmonary embolus can be fatal. (Web site)

Caution

  1. These drugs must be used with caution because as the clot dissolves, it may release from the site where it formed and becomes an embolus. (Web site)

Moves

  1. An embolus may be any material that forms a rounded mass (bolus) and moves through the circulatory system. (Web site)

Area

  1. If there is concern about a pulmonary embolus, the examiner may listen to the lungs, looking for abnormal sounds caused by an area of inflamed lung tissue. (Web site)

Location

  1. If it moves from that location through the bloodstream, it is referred to as an embolus and the disorder, an embolism.

Complication

  1. An embolus lodged in an artery of the brain produces the most feared complication, namely stroke. (Web site)

Life-Threatening

  1. An embolus that blocks an artery is a life-threatening condition. (Web site)
  2. A pulmonary embolus can be life-threatening.

Part

  1. If part of it breaks off, then it can cause blockage downstream, may travel to the lungs (pulmonary embolus) and result in serious illness or even death. (Web site)

Loose

  1. However, if a thrombus breaks loose from its location and travels to another location, it is then said to be an embolus and having caused an embolism. (Web site)

Symptoms

  1. Also, symptoms may be transient as the embolus is partially resorbed and moves to a different location or dissipates altogether.
  2. Go to the emergency room or call the local emergency number (such as 911) if you have symptoms of pulmonary embolus. (Web site)
  3. It is estimated that 1 in 10 people that go untreated with DVT can develop pulmonary embolus large enough to cause symptoms or even death. (Web site)

Obstruction

  1. Tissue necrosis is another postmortem finding in dogs with IMHA. Following obstruction of blood flow by an embolus, tissue necrosis or infarction occurs. (Web site)
  2. The obstruction may be the result of an embolus, a thrombus, or plaque.

Risk

  1. This treatment reduces the risk of getting a new embolus. (Web site)
  2. Due to the risk of getting an embolus in the lung, it is important that elderly people don't lie in bed more than is absolutely necessary. (Web site)
  3. When antithrombin III, protein C, or protein S is deficient or defective, there will be an increased risk of thrombus or embolus formation. (Web site)

Anticoagulation

  1. Anticoagulation prevents further growth of the blood clot and prevents it from forming an embolus that can travel to the lung. (Web site)

Fat

  1. A blood clot, bubble of air, fat from broken bones, or a piece of debris transported by the bloodstream is called an embolus.
  2. An embolus is most frequently a blood clot, but it can also be a number of other substances including fat (e.g.

Blocked

  1. Excruciating pain can occur suddenly when an artery is blocked by an embolus.

Patient

  1. A CT scan of the lungs is another way to determine if a patient has a pulmonary embolus.
  2. After a massive PE, the embolus must be resolved somehow if the patient is to survive. (Web site)
  3. In the lower half of the link abnormal perfusion scans demonstrate a large pulmonary embolus in the right lung of this patient. (Web site)

Occlusion

  1. Obstruction or occlusion of a blood vessel by an embolus. (Web site)

Shortness

  1. During the period of urokinase infusion, the patient experienced no shortness of breath or other symptoms suggestive of pulmonary embolus. (Web site)
  2. Common symptoms of a pulmonary embolus include: shortness of breath, chest pain and coughing up blood. (Web site)

Veins

  1. In paradoxical embolism, also known as crossed embolism, an embolus from the veins crosses to the arterial blood system. (Web site)
  2. This type of phlebitis is more likely to lead to blood clots in the veins and a possible blood clot in the lungs (pulmonary embolus). (Web site)

Vein

  1. This embolus (partial clot) flows through the vein, and if it is small enough it will not create any symptoms of concern. (Web site)
  2. If the clot breaks off (embolus) from the wall of a vein and travels to the lungs, this can create a life threatening pulmonary embolism (PE). (Web site)

Ischemic Stroke

  1. If the embolus reaches any of your carotid, vertebral, or basilar arteries, and creates a blockage, you will suffer an ischemic stroke.

Arteries

  1. Because the pressure in most arteries and veins is greater than atmospheric pressure, an air embolus does not always happen when a blood vessel is injured. (Web site)

Blood Vessels

  1. A clot that travels and then becomes lodged at some point in a blood vessels is called an embolus. (Web site)

Aorta

  1. If the embolus passes from the left side of your heart, it will likely emerge in your aorta.

Inferior Vena Cava

  1. As the embolus travels up the deep vein, it approaches the inferior vena cava.

Brain

  1. A wandering clot (an embolus) or some other particle that forms away from the brain, usually in the heart, may also cause an ischemic stroke.
  2. An embolus may also travel to the heart, brain, or eye. (Web site)
  3. The most common cause of a TIA is an embolus (a small blood clot) that occludes an artery in the brain. (Web site)

Heart

  1. A thrombus or embolus can be fatal if it lodges in a vital area like the heart or lungs. (Web site)
  2. Some arrhythmias promote blood clotting within the heart, and increase risk of embolus and stroke. (Web site)
  3. To reach the heart and lung from the legs, the embolus must travel up through the inferior vena cava, a large vein in the posterior abdomen. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Blood Clot
  2. Anatomy > Tissues > Blood > Thrombus
  3. Bloodstream
  4. Lungs
  5. Blood Vessel

Related Keywords

    * Amniotic Fluid * Arterial Embolism * Artery * Atrial Fibrillation * Block * Blockage * Blocks * Blood * Bloodstream * Blood Clot * Blood Vessel * Body * Break * Break Free * Clot * Clots * Dvt * Embolic Stroke * Embolism * Large * Local Therapy * Lodge * Lodges * Lung * Lungs * Male Spiders * Mismatch * Portion * Pulmonary * Pulmonary Artery * Pulmonary Embolism * Pulmonary Embolus * Sudden Blockage * Thrombus * Travel * Tumor * Venous Thrombosis * Vessel
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  Short phrases about "Embolus"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Links checked: July 29, 2013.
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