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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Society > Ethics > Happiness > Epicurus   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
PLEASURE
SOUL
EPICURUS
SCIENCE
DOCTRINES
DIVINE
THOUGHT
DEMOCRITUS
SCIENTISTS
ETHICS
SAYS
DIOGENES LAERTIUS
DIOGENES
MOVEMENTS
PURSUING
PHILOSOPHER
BAD
WRITINGS
FRAGMENTS
LETTERS
THEORY
HUMAN BEINGS
PHILOSOPHY
TAUGHT
LIVING
SCHOOL
PRUDENCE
LIFE
ULTIMATELY
SAMOS
DIRECTORY
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Epicurus"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Epicurus is one of the first philosophers to give a well-developed contractarian theory of justice. (Web site)
  2. Epicurus - An ancient Greek philosopher who promoted sensory pleasure (in moderation). (Web site)
  3. Epicurus is a vegetarian Greek philosopher.
  4. Epicurus is a teacher who passed to Lucretius the light of understanding.
  5. Epicurus is one of the first philosophers to put forward an Identity Theory of Mind. (Web site)

Pleasure

  1. The pleasure of Epicurus is a state, equably diffused, "the absence of [bodily] pain and [mental] anxiety". (Web site)
  2. Epicurean - Epicureans were a hedonistic school of philosophy, founded by Epicurus around 307 A.D., which held that simple pleasures were the highest good.
  3. Epicurus died in the second year of the 127th Olympiad, in the archonship of Pytharatus, at the age of 72.
  4. Epicurus also believed (in contradistinction to Aristotle) that death was not to be feared.
  5. Epicurus held that as the pains of the mind and soul are more grievous than those of the body, so the joys of the mind and soul exceed those of the body. (Web site)

Soul

  1. This cardinal tenet about the nature of the gods and death is bound up with Epicurus's views on the soul. (Web site)
  2. Epicurus rejected the existence of Platonic forms and an immaterial soul, and he said that the gods have no influence on our lives. (Web site)

Epicurus

  1. For instance, in what might be described as a "hangover" theory, Epicurus warned against pursuing love too ardently, as it often leads to pain.
  2. Epicurus explicitly warned against overindulgence because it often leads to pain.
  3. The playwright Menander served in the same age-class of the ephebes as Epicurus.
  4. Lactantius criticizes Epicurus at several points throughout his Divine Institutes. (Web site)
  5. Therefore, as Epicurus famously said, "death is nothing to us." When we exist death is not, and when death exists we are not.

Science

  1. Nietzsche cites his affinities to Epicurus in a number of his works, including The Gay Science, Beyond Good and Evil, and his private letters to Peter Gast.
  2. The attitude of Epicurus in this whole matter is antagonistic to science. (Web site)

Doctrines

  1. Epicurus seems to have learned of atomist doctrine through Democritus' follower Nausiphanes. (Web site)
  2. The Stoic doctrine of Fatalism seemed to Epicurus no less deadly a foe of man's true welfare than popular superstition. (Web site)

Divine

  1. Lactantius criticizes Epicurus at several points throughout his Divine Institutes.
  2. It goes without saying that for Epicurus the human soul was neither immortal nor did it have any divine attributes.

Thought

  1. Epicurus says that there are two kinds of motion: the straight motion and the curved motion, and its motion traverse as fast as the speed of thought.
  2. To prevent all reference of the more potent phenomena of nature to divine action Epicurus rationalizes the processes of the cosmos. (Web site)
  3. Because of the absence of Epicurus' own writings, we have to rely on later writers to reconstruct Epicurus' thought.

Democritus

  1. The second source is in the work of Epicurus but, in contrast to Aristotle, Epicurus is a strong believer in Democritus's atomic theory.
  2. Like Democritus, Epicurus believes that atoms have the properties of size, shape, and resistance.

Scientists

  1. More from Scientist Biography information about Epicurus © 2006 through a partnership of Answers Corporation.
  2. One of ancient Greece's best known scientists, Pythagoras, was from this island, but Aristarchus, Epicurus, Herodotos and Aesop also lived here. (Web site)

Ethics

  1. The study of ethics was developed further by Epicurus and the epicurean movement, and by Zeno and the stoics.
  2. Epicurus divides his philosophy into three parts: the canonic ( to kanonikon); the physics ( to phusikon) and ethics ( to êthikon). (Web site)

Says

  1. Epicurus then, in his work On the Canon, says that the criteria of truth are the senses, the preconceptions and the feelings.
  2. Epicurus says that to be rich is no relief, but only an alteration, of affairs. (Web site)

Diogenes Laertius

  1. Epicurus of Samos (341-270 B.C.) was the founder of the Epicurean sect, which in many respects resembles the Cyrenaic but is higher in its ethical standards. (Web site)
  2. Epicurus's output was very large; Diogenes Laertius, his principal biographer, lists 40 works, one of them, On Nature, comprising 37 books. (Web site)
  3. Herculaneum Papyrus, 1005, 4.9-14)Epicurus` philosophy of the physical world is found in "Letter to Herodotus": Diogenes Laertius 10.34-83.

Diogenes

  1. This work of Epicurus is preserved by Diogenes Laertius in his second century AD book.
  2. Epicurus wrote over 300 manuscripts according to Diogenes of Oenoanda but much of that has been lost. (Web site)

Movements

  1. A Marxist interpretation of Epicurus, the Epicurean movement, and its opponents.
  2. The study of ethics was developed further by Epicurus and the epicurean movement, and by Zeno and the stoics.
  3. The two are related: Epicurus set in motion an intellectual movement that Charles Darwin brought to completion. (Web site)

Pursuing

  1. Although Epicurus believed in pursuing pleasure, he was by no means a hedonist in our modern sense of the word. (Web site)
  2. For instance, in what might be described as a "hangover" theory, Epicurus warned against pursuing love too ardently, as it often leads to pain. (Web site)

Philosopher

  1. Another important philosopher from the Hellenistic period is Epicurus. (Web site)
  2. Epicurus (342-270 BC) was a Greek philosopher and the founder of Epicureanism. (Web site)
  3. Heraclitus, Democritus, Socrates, Plato Aristotle, Epicurus are generally considered as the most influential of ancient Greek philosophers.
  4. The ancient philosopher Epicurus took up the analogy, and claimed that any philosopher who did not reduce spiritual suffering was worthless.
  5. Epicurus Greek philosopher, author of an ethical philosophy of simple pleasure, friendship, and retirement.

Bad

  1. Epicurus' philosophy is based on the theory that all good and bad derive from sensation. (Web site)
  2. Epicurus also believed (in contradistinction to Aristotle) that death was not bad. (Web site)

Writings

  1. Some writings by Epicurus have survived.
  2. A student of Greek philosophy and especially of the writings of Epicurus. (Web site)

Fragments

  1. Epicurus participated in the activities of traditional Greek religion, but taught that one should avoid holding false opinions about the gods.
  2. In a purposefully unfavourable expression, Epicurus is titled in Modern Greek idiom as the so-called "Dark Philosopher".
  3. The word for a heretic in the Talmudic literature is "Apikoros", and Epicurus is titled in Modern Greek idiom as the "Dark Philosopher".
  4. Epicurus makes atomism serve a moral purpose. (Web site)
  5. Furthermore, numerous fragments of Epicurus’ work On Nature were found in the ruins of Herculaneum.

Letters

  1. Nietzsche cites his affinities to Epicurus in a number of his works, including The Gay Science, Beyond Good and Evil, and his private letters to Peter Gast. (Web site)
  2. Only a few fragments and letters remain of Epicurus 's 300 written works.

Theory

  1. Epicurus' theory of perception explains why sensations are irrefutable. (Web site)
  2. Lucretius gives a fuller account of Epicurus' theory of perception in his On the Nature of the Universe, Book 4. (Web site)

Human Beings

  1. Epicurus denies, however, the relevance of the gods to human beings. (Web site)
  2. It would seem that Epicurus does not believe that human beings desire to remain in existence forever. (Web site)

Philosophy

  1. The philosophy originated by Epicurus flourished for seven centuries.
  2. Other sources for a knowledge of Epicurus' philosophy include works by Cicero, Seneca and Plutarch. (Web site)
  3. Epicurus defined philosophy as the art of making life happy and strictly subordinated metaphysics to ethics, naming pleasure as the highest and only good. (Web site)
  4. Epicurus also had a garden where he walked and taught, and bequeathed it to Hermarchus of Mytilene.
  5. Both Epicurus and Zeno, the Stoic, believed in an individualistic and materialistic philosophy. (Web site)

Taught

  1. However, Epicurus taught that not all pleasures are good.
  2. Epicurus also had a garden where he walked and taught, and bequeathed it to Hermarchus of Mytilene.

Living

  1. As such the living material process, Epicurus, lives on in the eviternal present of transhistoricity.
  2. A year later, however, Antipater banished some 12,000 of the poorer citizens, and Epicurus joined his father, who was now living at Colophon. (Web site)

School

  1. Epicurus' school had a small but devoted following in his lifetime. (Web site)
  2. This original school was based in Epicurus' home and garden.
  3. Epicurus accepted the philosophy of Democritus concerning the nature of atoms and based his physics upon this theory. (Web site)
  4. Epicurus' school, called "The Garden," seems to have been a moderately ascetic community which rejected the political limelight of Athenian philosophy.
  5. Or why does he not eliminate them?"--Epicurus (from "The Epicurus Reader", translated and edited by Brad Inwood and L.P. Gerson, Hackett Publishing, 1994, p.

Prudence

  1. Therefore Epicurus regarded prudence as an important virtue and saw things like drinking to excess to be contrary to the attainment of ataraxia and aponia. (Web site)
  2. Epicurus says that all of the virtues are ultimately forms of prudence, of calculating what is in one's own best interest. (Web site)

Life

  1. Tetrapharmakos, or, "The four-part cure," is Epicurus' overall statement of how to live the happiest possible life.
  2. For Epicurus, the highest pleasure (tranquility and freedom from fear) was obtained by knowledge, friendship, and living a virtuous and temperate life.
  3. The system of Epicurus deemphasized the traditional power of religious and physical forces on human life and emphasized our freedom of action. (Web site)
  4. According to epicurus one should live out his natural life, this would be prudent.
  5. Metonymically, we could say that for Epicurus, human subjectivity was a special mension of this universal subjectivity.

Ultimately

  1. Pleasure and pain were ultimately, for Epicurus, the basis for the moral distinction between good and bad.
  2. All of our knowledge ultimately comes from the senses, thinks Epicurus, and we can trust the senses, when properly used. (Web site)

Samos

  1. Shortly thereafter, his family was driven out of Samos, and as refugees, Epicurus rejoined them.
  2. Epicurus’ father was a poor Athenian colonist and a schoolmaster, who had lived with his family on the island of Samos.
  3. Born on the Greek island of Samos, Epicurus lived and taught mainly in Athens, where he was a precise contemporary of the playwright Menander. (Web site)
  4. Extractions: Bertrand Russell (circa 341-270 BC) Epicurus was an ancient Greek philosopher, born on the island Samos. (Web site)

Directory

  1. A directory of contemporary followers of Epicurus can be found on gardenofepicurus.com.
  2. A growing directory of contemporary Gardens of Epicurus can be found at www.gardenofepicurus.com The Epicurean doctrines are by no means extinct.

Categories

  1. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Society > Ethics > Happiness
  2. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Thought > Philosophy > Philosophers
  3. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Thought > Philosophy
  4. Aggression > Conflicts > Criticisms > Atheism
  5. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Society > Ethics
  6. Books about "Epicurus" in Amazon.com

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  Short phrases about "Epicurus"
  Originally created: September 10, 2007.
  Links checked: April 19, 2013.
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