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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Time > History > Civilizations > Ancient Rome > Fasces   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
FIGURE
SHIELD
CASE
INSTANCE
BOTTOM
SUPPORTERS
LIMITS
LOGOS
SALUTE
SHORT SWORD
PEACE
OLIVE BRANCH
ARMS
SYMBOLISM
ITALIAN FASCISM
UNITED STATES SENATE
LAUREL
ROSTRUM
PROVIDENCE
BUNDLE
LICTORS
BIBULUS
POWER
SYMBOL
AXES
AXE
RODS
CONSUL
CONSULS
ROMANS
ANCIENT ROME
FASCES
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Fasces"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. A fasces is a Roman device. (Web site)
  2. A fasces is visible on either side of the American Flag behind the rostrum in the United States House of Representatives.
  3. Fasces is a symbol of authority, then and now.
  4. The fasces is a symbol associated with justice (from Roman lictor 's axes, in this case not fascism).
  5. The fasces is a symbol of authority while the anchor is the mariner 's symbol for Columbus.

Figure

  1. A frieze on the facade of the Supreme Court building depicts the figure of a Roman centurion holding a fasces, to represent "order".

Shield

  1. In one hand she bore a shield with the Roman fasces and in the other a lance crowned with the cap of liberty.

Case

  1. Instead however of having only twelve lictors, as was the case with the consuls, he was preceded by twenty-four bearing the secures as well as the fasces. (Web site)

Instance

  1. For instance, the top border of the Los Angeles Police Department badge features a fasces.
  2. For instance, the regimental crest of the U.S. 71st Infantry Regiment of the New York National Guard consisted of a gold fasces set on a blue background.

Bottom

  1. Note the crossed fasces at the bottom.

Supporters

  1. Verginius and Icilius were arrested, and their supporters returned to attack the lictor s and destroy their fasces. (Web site)

Limits

  1. Traditionally, fasces carried within the Pomerium — the limits of the sacred inner City of Rome — had their axe blades removed. (Web site)

Logos

  1. Both the Norwegian and Swedish Police Service have double fasces in their logos.

Salute

  1. The lowering of the Fasces was form of salute to a higher official.

Short Sword

  1. Mounted on the shield is a fasces with an anchor and a short sword crossed behind it.

Peace

  1. Surrounding the fasces is a full-foliaged branch of olive, symbolical of peace.'".

Olive Branch

  1. Balancing the forces of war and peace, the fasces as depicted on the dime is intertwined with an olive branch.
  2. The reverse of the United States "Mercury" dime (minted from 1916 to 1945) bears the design of a fasces and an olive branch.

Arms

  1. The coats of arms of Norte de Santander, a department of Colombia, and of its capital Cúcuta, both feature a fasces.

Symbolism

  1. Believed to date from Etruscan times, the symbolism of the fasces at one level suggested strength through unity.

Italian Fascism

  1. Italian fascism, which derives its name from the fasces, arguably used this symbolism the most in the 20th century.

United States Senate

  1. The official seal of the United States Senate has as one component a pair of crossed fasces.

Laurel

  1. But neither in his letters to the senate, nor in the fasces, did he use the laurel as a mark of honor.

Rostrum

  1. A fasces appears on either side of the American Flag behind the rostrum in the United States House of Representatives.

Providence

  1. The fasces appears on the state seal of Colorado, USA, beneath the "All-seeing eye" (or Eye of Providence) and above the mountains and mines.
  2. The use of either the Eye of Providence or the fasces in churches in the United States is not common.

Bundle

  1. It is derived from the Italian word fascio, which means "bundle" or "union",[9] and from the Latin word fasces.

Lictors

  1. Verginius and Icilius were arrested, and their supporters returned to attack the lictors and destroy their fasces. (Web site)
  2. The lictors of the imperator, their fasces wreathed with laurel 8.
  3. Macrinus then stepped up to Caesar's side, and the lictors who followed him, by lowering their fasces, signaled to the warriors to keep silence. (Web site)

Bibulus

  1. Caesar presented his bill at the Assembly anyway, and when Bibulus tried to intervene, the crowd broke his fasces and dumped feces on him. (Web site)
  2. His lictors had their fasces broken, two tribunes accompanying him were wounded, and Bibulus himself had a bucket of excrement thrown over him.
  3. His lictor s had their fasces broken, two tribunes accompanying him were wounded, and Bibulus himself had a bucket of excrement thrown over him.

Power

  1. The fasces, which symbolize unity as well as power, have often been used as emblems, e.g., on the arms of the French republic and on American coins.

Symbol

  1. Antiquity "With one hand he returns the fasces, symbol of power as appointed dictator of Rome.
  2. The following cases all involve the adoption of the fasces as a symbol or icon; no actual physical re-introduction has occurred.

Axes

  1. When inside the pomerium, the lictors removed the axes from the fasces to show that a citizen couldn't be executed without a trial.

Axe

  1. Chance has thrown an example of the fasces into our possession: remains of bronze rods and the axe come from a tomb in Etruscan Vetulonia.
  2. The traditional Roman fasces consisted of a bundle of birch rods tied together with a red ribbon as a cylinder around an axe.

Rods

  1. The reverse shows a design of the bundle of rods, with battle-ax, known as Fasces, and symbolical of unity, wherein lies the Nation's strength.
  2. The name comes from fascio, which may mean "bundle", as in a political group, but also fasces, the Roman authority symbol of a bundle of rods and axe-head.

Consul

  1. Bearers of fasces preceded praetor s, propraetor s, consul s, proconsul s, Masters of the Horse, dictator s, and Caesar s.
  2. Gaius Julius Caesar was killed in the senate-house on the Ides of March, after which P.Dolabella took up the fasces [became consul]. (Web site)

Consuls

  1. Bearers of fasces preceded praetors, propraetors, consuls, proconsuls, Masters of the Horse, dictators, and Caesars.
  2. Upon entering the Comitia Centuriata, the lictors would lower the fasces to show that the powers of the consuls derive from the people (populus romanus). (Web site)
  3. After his accession, Diocletian and Lucius Caesonius Bassus[ 35] were named as consuls.[ 36] They assumed the fasces in place of Carinus and Numerianus. (Web site)

Romans

  1. The Romans believed that the fasces were introduced in Rome from Etruria. (Web site)
  2. The Romans adopted the symbol of the fasces from the Etruscans.

Ancient Rome

  1. The salute was adopted by Mussolini who took it from Ancient Rome as he did many other things like the Fasces.
  2. The fasces lictoriae ("bundles of the lictors") (in Italian, fascio littorio) was, in ancient Rome, a symbol of power and authority (imperium). (Web site)

Fasces

  1. The symbol of fascism, in its original Italian incarnation under Benito Mussolini, and which gave fascism its name, was the fasces.
  2. They carried rods decorated with fasces and, outside the pomerium, with axes that symbolized the power to execute.
  3. The Mercury dimes reverse features a fasces, the ancient symbol of power and authority carried by Roman magistrates in the days of Ancient Rome.

Categories

  1. Time > History > Civilizations > Ancient Rome
  2. Consuls
  3. Rods
  4. Axe
  5. Government > Empires > Emperors > Carinus
  6. Books about "Fasces" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Fasces"
  Originally created: September 10, 2007.
  Links checked: July 30, 2013.
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