KeyWEn.com  
 
 
 
Four-Stroke Cycle       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Otto Cycle > Four-Stroke Cycle   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
LUBRICATION SYSTEMS
OPTIMUM MOMENT
COMPLETE FOUR-STROKE CYCLE
TRUCK
VARIANT
POUND
CAMSHAFT
GASOLINE ENGINES
DIESEL CYCLE
OTTO CYCLE
TWO-STROKE CYCLE
INTAKE STROKE
EXHAUST STROKE
RECIPROCATING ENGINES
MOTORCYCLES
EXHAUST VALVE
CYLINDER
TWO-STROKE
ENGINES
PISTON
PARTIAL VACUUM
DIESEL
DIESELS
FOUR-STROKE
CRANKSHAFT
INTERNAL COMBUSTION
FOUR-STROKE CYCLE
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Four-Stroke Cycle"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. The four-stroke cycle is more efficient than the two-stroke cycle, but requires considerably more moving parts and manufacturing expertise. (Web site)
  2. Its four-stroke cycle is generally generated in a space between the inside of an oval-like epitrochoid -shaped housing and a roughly triangular rotor.
  3. In the four-stroke cycle, the piston moves downward as the intake valve opens to allow fresh air and fuel into the cylinder.

Lubrication Systems

  1. The two common types of four-stroke cycle engine lubrication systems are the wet sump and the dry sump. (Web site)

Optimum Moment

  1. The peak of the combustion process no longer occurs at the optimum moment for the four-stroke cycle. (Web site)

Complete Four-Stroke Cycle

  1. Consider a complete four-stroke cycle for one cylinder. (Web site)

Truck

  1. Most truck and automotive diesel engines use a four-stroke cycle, but with a compression heating ignition system. (Web site)

Variant

  1. Engines based on the five-stroke cycle are a variant of the four-stroke cycle.

Pound

  1. D. Overhead Cam (OHC) Four-Stroke Cycle Engine or Engines, 245 lbs plus one pound for every 2cc or fraction of a cc.

Camshaft

  1. The duration specification of a camshaft is measured in crankshaft degrees of which there are 720 in one complete four-stroke cycle. (Web site)

Gasoline Engines

  1. Four-stroke cycle used in gasoline engines.

Diesel Cycle

  1. Most Diesel engines use a four-stroke cycle, but with a compression heating ignition system it is possible to talk separately about a diesel cycle. (Web site)

Otto Cycle

  1. Operation Four-stroke cycle (or Otto cycle) 1.
  2. Nikolaus Otto working with Gottlieb Daimler and Wilhelm Maybach in the 1870s developed a practical four-stroke cycle (Otto cycle) engine. (Web site)

Two-Stroke Cycle

  1. There are two ways that an internal combustion piston engine can transform combustion into motive power: the two-stroke cycle and the four-stroke cycle. (Web site)
  2. Engines have either a four-stroke cycle or a two-stroke cycle; most engines operate on the four-stroke cycle.
  3. It was an advantage of American diesel-electric submarines that they operated a two-stroke cycle as opposed to the four-stroke cycle that other navies used.

Intake Stroke

  1. The four-stroke cycle starts with the intake stroke. (Web site)

Exhaust Stroke

  1. Finally, the cylinders exhaust the combusted charge during an exhaust stroke, and the four-stroke cycle is repeated. (Web site)

Reciprocating Engines

  1. The majority of reciprocating engines operate on what is known as the four-stroke cycle.

Motorcycles

  1. Today, internal combustion engines in cars, trucks, motorcycles, aircraft, construction machinery and many others, most commonly use a four-stroke cycle.

Exhaust Valve

  1. It is best to begin with the exhaust valve, because in the four-stroke cycle the exhaust valve does it job before the intake valve. (Web site)

Cylinder

  1. The four-stroke cycle requires, for each engine cylinder, two crankshaft revolutions for each power stroke.
  2. The four-stroke cycle then begins again with the opening of the intake valve and a downstroke of the cylinder. (Web site)
  3. On the final stroke of the four-stroke cycle the piston moves from BDC to TDC forcing the gases tot he top of the cylinder. (Web site)

Two-Stroke

  1. It will be interesting to know that from the thermodynamic point of view, there is no difference between two-stroke and four-stroke cycle engine. (Web site)

Engines

  1. All diesel engines fall into one of two categories, two-stroke or four-stroke cycle engines.
  2. In four-stroke cycle engines and some two-stroke cycle engines, the valve timing is controlled by the camshaft. (Web site)
  3. Big size bulky two-stroke cycle engines have lubrication systems like that of four-stroke cycle engines. (Web site)

Piston

  1. During the four-stroke cycle of a typical car motor, the piston drops in the cylinder, allowing it to fill with a mixture of gasoline and air. (Web site)
  2. The final stage of the four-stroke cycle is when the piston comes back up and forces the spent gases out of the exhaust valve. (Web site)

Partial Vacuum

  1. In a Four-stroke cycle engine, it is the Piston's first stroke down in pulling fuel and air into the Combustion chamber as it causes a partial Vacuum.

Diesel

  1. The diesel engine four-stroke cycle differs from this pattern only by having a higher compression ratio and a correspondingly higher expansion ratio. (Web site)

Diesels

  1. Most diesels generally use the four-stroke cycle, with some larger diesels operating on the two-stroke cycle.

Four-Stroke

  1. In a four-stroke engine, companion cylinders are those that reach TDC and BDC at the same time, though they are in different phases of the four-stroke cycle.

Crankshaft

  1. In a four-stroke cycle, six-cylinder engine, for example, the cranks on the crankshaft are set 120 degrees apart. (Web site)
  2. In a four-stroke cycle engine, the camshaft is geared to the crankshaft so that it runs at half the crankshaft's speed. (Web site)
  3. Each valve opens only once during the four-stroke cycle; that is, the camshaft makes one rotation for every two rotations of the crankshaft. (Web site)

Internal Combustion

  1. In 1876, Nikolaus Otto patented the Four-stroke cycle engine, a gas internal combustion engine with intake, compression, power, and exhaust strokes.
  2. Today, internal combustion engine s in cars, truck s, motorcycles, aircraft, construction machinery and many others, most commonly use a four-stroke cycle.
  3. In a piston engine, one complete four-stroke cycle produces two complete revolutions of the crankshaft (see How Car Engines Work: Internal Combustion). (Web site)

Four-Stroke Cycle

  1. The Atkinson cycle allows the intake, compression, power, and exhaust strokes of the four-stroke cycle to occur in a single turn of the crankshaft. (Web site)
  2. In the four-stroke cycle, also known as the Otto cycle, the downward movement of a piston located within a cylinder creates a partial vacuum. (Web site)
  3. There are two commonly used internal combustion engine cycles: the two-stroke cycle and the four-stroke cycle.

Categories

  1. Otto Cycle
  2. Internal Combustion
  3. Encyclopedia of Finance. > Technology > Engines > Crankshaft
  4. Diesels
  5. Four-Stroke
  6. Books about "Four-Stroke Cycle" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Four-Stroke Cycle"
  Originally created: May 20, 2008.
  Links checked: February 03, 2013.
  Please send us comments and questions by this Online Form
  Please click on Move Up to move good phrases up.
0.0098 sec. a=1..