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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > World > Countries > United Kingdom > Scotland > Gaelic   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
GAELIC HARP
TOWN
TRADITIONAL COUNTY
ABERDEENSHIRE
GAELIC LITERATURE
GAELIC SPORTS
GAA
GAELIC ORIGINS
GAELIC ORIGIN
SCOTTISH GAELIC SPEAKERS
NATIVE GAELIC SPEAKERS
BURGH
GAELIC FOOTBALL STAR
SCOTTISH GAELIC LANGUAGE
FORMER ROYAL BURGH
ROYAL BURGH
SCOTTISH GAELIC NAME
GAELIC LEAGUE
GALLAIBH
LIEUTENANCY AREA
GAELIC NAME
GAELIC GAMES
BEGINNING
VARIATION
SCHOOL
SCHOOLS
CULTURE
HERITAGE
BEARING
NAMES
TOPICS
THEMSELVES
CENTURIES
MOTHER
CHURCH
HEAD
POPULATION
MEANS
PARALLEL
ANYTHING
REFERENCES
REFERENCE
DEGREE
CHANNEL
CENTRE
SMALL TOWN
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Gaelic"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Gaelic is a Celtic language, like Irish, Scots is a Germanic language like English. (Web site)
  2. Gaelic is an integral part of Scotland's identity and a vital part of the community life and culture in the Highlands and Islands. (Web site)
  3. Gaelic was rarely used as a written language in medieval Scotland, so we will also discuss written forms of your name in other languages. (Web site)
  4. Gaelic is going through changes and it is fair to ask if these changes mean growth or death for the language.
  5. Old Gaelic, the precursor to both Modern Irish and Scottish Gaelic, was written in a carved writing called Ogham. (Web site)

Gaelic Harp

  1. The harp, and specifically the Cláirseach (or Gaelic harp), has long been Ireland 's heraldic emblem.

Town

  1. The town was then populated by Phrygians and Celts—the Galatians who spoke a language closely related to Welsh and Gaelic. (Web site)

Traditional County

  1. Ayrshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Àir in Scottish Gaelic) is a traditional county in south-west Scotland, located on the shores of the Firth of Clyde.

Aberdeenshire

  1. The historic county of Aberdeenshire (Siorrachd Obar Dheathain in Gaelic) was until 1975 a county of Scotland.

Gaelic Literature

  1. Ireland is famous for its contributions to world literature (see Gaelic Literature; Irish Literature). (Web site)

Gaelic Sports

  1. Gaelic sports consist of hurling, camogie, and Gaelic football, as well as handball and shinty.
  2. In the history of Ireland, Gaelic sports were connected with cultural nationalism.

Gaa

  1. Football and Gaelic sanctioned by the AFL and GAA.

Gaelic Origins

  1. The City reflects the Gaelic origins of its name by playing host to a new American shinty club, Dunedin Camanachd.

Gaelic Origin

  1. The word itself is of Gaelic origin, from the Middle Irish word "triubhas" (close-fitting shorts).

Scottish Gaelic Speakers

  1. Similarly, Scottish Gaelic speakers find offensive the use of the obsolete word Erse (from Erisch, "Irish") to refer to their language.

Native Gaelic Speakers

  1. Island English is the variety spoken as a second language by native Gaelic speakers in the Outer Hebrides.
  2. Native Gaelic speakers who have spent extended periods outside the Highlands and acquired some other variety of English.

Burgh

  1. Thurso[1] (from Old Norse, meaning 'Bull's water') (Inbhir Theòrsa in Scottish Gaelic)[2] is a town and a burgh on the north coast of Scotland. (Web site)

Gaelic Football Star

  1. A successful hurling and gaelic football star, Jack Lynch (full name: John Mary Lynch) (1917-1999) was the fourth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland. (Web site)

Scottish Gaelic Language

  1. Most communities in the Outer Hebrides use the Scottish Gaelic language.
  2. Various other languages, which are not closely related, have been heavily influenced by Norse, particularly the Norman dialects and Scottish Gaelic language.
  3. Until its decline in the 19th cent., the Scottish Gaelic language was the core of Highland culture. (Web site)

Former Royal Burgh

  1. Perth (Scottish Gaelic: Peairt) is a town and former royal burgh in central Scotland.

Royal Burgh

  1. The Royal Burgh of Ayr (Scottish Gaelic, Inbhir Àir) in the south-west of Scotland is a burgh situated on the Firth of Clyde.

Scottish Gaelic Name

  1. Footnotes ^ Ordnance Survey grid reference for Thurso: ND116683 ^ The Scottish Gaelic name is a translation which assumes the town is named for the river.

Gaelic League

  1. Dublin also became the center of a Gaelic renaissance: the Gaelic League was founded there in 1893, and the Abbey Theatre began producing Irish plays. (Web site)

Gallaibh

  1. Caithness (Gallaibh in Gaelic) is a traditional county and former administrative county within the Highland area of Scotland.
  2. The Scottish Gaelic name for Caithness, however, is Gallaibh, meaning among the Strangers (i.e.

Lieutenancy Area

  1. Angus (Aonghas in Gaelic) is one of the 32 local government council areas of Scotland, a registration county and a lieutenancy area. (Web site)
  2. East Lothian (Lodainn an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland, and a Lieutenancy Area.

Gaelic Name

  1. Occasionally an approximation to its gaelic name "Éire" will be used in an English language context to distinguish it from Northern Ireland.

Gaelic Games

  1. The Gaelic Games of hurling and football are also the most popular spectator sports in Ireland; 1,962,769 people attended GAA games in 2003.
  2. Even at the height of his career, Lynch had come to be regarded as one of the all-time greats of Gaelic games. (Web site)
  3. In a number of respects the island operates officially as a single entity, for example, in Gaelic games, rugby, and certain other sports.

Beginning

  1. The most common class of Gaelic surnames are, of course, those beginning with mac (Gaelic for son), such as MacGillEathain (MacLean). (Web site)
  2. By the beginning of the 21st century, the number of native Gaelic speakers had fallen to well below 1,000. (Web site)

Variation

  1. Often wrongly confused as a variation of Gaelic Football, it is actually a unique game all of it's own and a vast improvement over all others. (Web site)

School

  1. The school also provides nursery and childcare for the Gaelic community in the city.

Schools

  1. There is no hope for Gaelic in Scotland unless we get "Gaelic only" schools for those who want to be brought up with Gaelic.
  2. They should allow schools to teach gaelic if thats what the locals want.

Culture

  1. Gaelic culture is alive and the Gaelic language is still spoken in the homes at the western end of the peninsula.
  2. This small pub near the Museum of Scotland is a landmark for Scottish and Gaelic culture. (Web site)
  3. Am Braighe A newspaper (primarily in English) that intends to be a meeting place for Gaels and anyone interested in Scottish Gaelic language and culture. (Web site)

Heritage

  1. Pearse became interested in the heritage and history of Ireland at a very early age and joined the Gaelic League when 21 years old.

Bearing

  1. The majority of those bearing the name are of Gaelic origin, but many Irish Boyles have separate, Norman origins. (Web site)

Names

  1. An Act to enable local authorities in Scotland to take Gaelic names; and for connected purposes. (Web site)

Topics

  1. Topics include Python, other programming languages, Gaelic, Science Fiction, podcasting and audio books.
  2. Gaelic Wolf Scouting Pages - Topics include: Cell phones in the woods, ADD, hypothermia, dealing with death, first aid, game, and activities.

Themselves

  1. The majority of current Irish people believe themselves to be descended from Gaelic peoples living in Ireland prior to the Viking and Norman settlements.

Centuries

  1. After the Milesian (Gaelic) conquest the High Kingship is contested for centuries between the descendants of Eber Finn and Érimón, sons of Míl Espáine. (Web site)

Mother

  1. Mam means "female breast " in Irish Gaelic and "mother" in Welsh. (Web site)

Church

  1. The Church of Scotland (CofS; Scottish Gaelic:), known informally by its pre-Union Scots name, The Kirk, is the national church of Scotland. (Web site)
  2. The relationship between the Church and Gaelic has not always been an easy one. (Web site)

Head

  1. Torrin, or Na Torran to use its Gaelic name, is a picturesque crofting community nestling near the head of Loch Slapin, a narrow sea loch in southwest Skye.

Population

  1. The population of Caithness in 1891 was 33,177, and in 1901, 33,870, of whom twenty-four persons spoke Gaelic only, and 2876 Gaelic and English. (Web site)
  2. Slightly more than 1% of the population are native Gaelic speakers, a Celtic language similar to Irish. (Web site)
  3. The 19th century "clearances" led to significant reductions in population and the end of the Gaelic language and way of life.

Means

  1. The name "Kingussie" comes from the Gaelic, "Ceann a' Ghiuthsaich" which means "Head of the Pines".
  2. WHISKEY The Irish invented it and in Gaelic, it means "the water of life". (Web site)

Parallel

  1. Though a folk etymology derives the English word "bonfire" from these "bone fires," the Gaelic has no such parallel.

Anything

  1. I haven't said anything about the British languages Welch, Erse and Gaelic.
  2. Many youngsters dont know their history, if learning gaelic could somehow become "cool" I think that would do more than anything to save the language.

References

  1. There are many references to Gaelic (Welsh) and Hebrew speakers who claimed to be able to communicate with the North American natives in their mother tongue. (Web site)

Reference

  1. The name Ross allegedly derives from a Gaelic word meaning a headland - perhaps a reference to the Black Isle. (Web site)
  2. As " Seonaidh," which is Gaelic "Johnny," it may also be a reference to one of St. John and an invocation of him.

Degree

  1. Historically, Gaelic has not received the same degree of official recognition from the UK Government as Welsh.
  2. The other national languages of the UK (Welsh, Irish, Scots and Scottish Gaelic) are confined to their respective nations, except Welsh to some degree.

Channel

  1. Tele-G is the only Gaelic language service, broadcasting UK wide on the Freeview platform every night between 6pm and 7pm on Channel 8.
  2. Tele-G is the only Gaelic language, broadcasting UK wide on the Freeview platform every night between 6pm and 7pm on Channel 8.

Centre

  1. Donegal is the centre of the north-west Gaeltacht, a region where Gaelic is the first language and where the traditional culture is promoted. (Web site)

Small Town

  1. Maud (Gaelic: Am Mòd) is a small town in the Buchan area of the Scottish county of Aberdeenshire. (Web site)

Categories

  1. World > Countries > United Kingdom > Scotland
  2. World > Countries > Ireland > Irish
  3. Countries > United Kingdom > Scotland > Highland
  4. Scots
  5. Society > Culture > Languages > Language

Related Keywords

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  Short phrases about "Gaelic"
  Originally created: December 05, 2006.
  Links checked: May 18, 2013.
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