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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Paleozoic Era > Geologic Time   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
GEOLOGIC TIME SCALE
EARLIER
TIMES
SCIENTISTS
SCIENTIFIC
TERMS
STABLE
FORMATIONS
WORLD
PLATES
OCEANIC CRUST
PALEONTOLOGISTS
CENTIMETER
EROSION
SUPERCONTINENTS
DINOSAURS
PALEOZOIC
PERIOD
PLATE TECTONICS
OCEAN BASINS
ERA
ERAS
SILURIAN PERIOD
DIVISION
GEOCHRONOLOGY
CONTINENTAL DRIFT
HOME RANGE
YEARS
MILLIONS
FOSSILS
MESOZOIC MAMMALS
COMPACTED
PERIODS
PRECAMBRIAN
MYA
ROCKS
STRATIGRAPHY
GEOLOGY
GEOLOGISTS
TERTIARY PERIOD
MESOZOIC ERA
EPOCHS
TIME
PALEOZOIC ERA
GEOLOGIC TIME
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Geologic Time"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Geologic time is divided into eons, eras, epochs, and periods.
  2. Geologic time is divided into two eons; the Phanerozoic and PrePhanerozoic (or Precambrian).
  3. In geologic time, the Silurian Period, the third period of the Paleozoic Era, covers the time from roughly 440 million years ago (mya) until 410 mya.
  4. In geologic time, the Mesozoic Era, the second era in the Phanerozoic Eon, spans the time between roughly 250 million years ago (mya) and 65 mya.
  5. Over geologic time, the ejection of large quantities of ash can produce an ash cone.

Geologic Time Scale

  1. Applying Steno's Laws and the Principle of Faunal Succession led to the creation of a relative chronology of Earth history, or the geologic time scale.
  2. Young sedimentary rocks, especially those of Quaternary age (the most recent period of the geologic time scale) are often still unconsolidated.

Earlier

  1. The techniques and general idea of biostratigraphy was discussed earlier in the term when we talked about geologic time.

Times

  1. There are also times the rip in the crust is relatively inactive, and very little basaltic magma is generated for a long span of geologic time.

Scientists

  1. Since then scientists have developed a more precise conceptual structure of geologic time, into which the Caledonian Orogeny fits as follows.
  2. This method is called radiometric age dating, and it has allowed scientists to continue refining the accuracy of the geologic time scale.

Scientific

  1. The Geologic Time Scale is a statement of evolutionary dogma which cannot be proved by any scientific methods.

Terms

  1. Selected links include photos from the 1915 eruption of Lassen Peak, a glossary of terms, a geologic time scale, and U.S. Geological Survey publications.

Stable

  1. Many snail fossils are recrystallized (see below) because the original shell material (aragonite) is not stable over geologic time.

Formations

  1. The age of formations is marked on a geologic calendar known as the geologic time scale.

World

  1. By examining relationships like these all over the world, the Geologic Time scale has been very precisely correlated with the Geologic Column.

Plates

  1. Over geologic time, these major plates have periodically joined together to form supercontinents.

Oceanic Crust

  1. When you consider how much oceanic crust has been formed over the course of geologic time, it's pretty amazing how little of it is exposed above sea level.
  2. Red indicates oceanic crust created quite recently on the geologic time scale.

Paleontologists

  1. The geologic time scale was developed based on the relative ages of rock strata as determined by the early paleontologists and stratigraphers.

Centimeter

  1. Though the antarctic plate has drifted south only about a centimeter a year, geologic time eventually yields cataclysmic results.

Erosion

  1. The unconformity represents an interval of geologic time, called the hiatus, during which no deposition occurred and erosion removed preexisting rock.

Supercontinents

  1. Other supercontinents are hypothesized to have formed and broken apart earlier in geologic time.

Dinosaurs

  1. Except for the birds, who are the sole surviving descendants of the dinosaurs, the dinosaurs and people are well separated in terms of geologic time.
  2. Ages of dinosaurs cited in your text are based on such direct absolute age determinations or by correlating rocks containing them to the geologic time scale.

Paleozoic

  1. All geologic time, and its corresponding rocks, before the beginning of the Paleozoic; it is equivalent to about 90% of geologic time.

Period

  1. The Devonian has been called the "Age of the Fishes" because oif the tremendous diversity of fish groups that evolved during this period of geologic time.
  2. Cretaceous is a period of geologic time that ended at about 65 million years ago.
  3. Paleogene Paleogene (alternatively Palaeogene) period is a unit of geologic time that began 65 and ended 23 million years ago.

Plate Tectonics

  1. The extent to which plate tectonics has influenced Earth's evolution through geologic time depends on when the process started.

Ocean Basins

  1. Thus, as continents move, ocean basins open and close over geologic time.
  2. The ocean basins are transient features over geologic time, changing shape and depth while the process of plate tectonics proceeds.

Era

  1. An era of geologic time between the Paleozoic and the Cenozoic.

Eras

  1. The Cenozoic Era is last of the five major eras of geologic time, beginning about 65 million years ago and extending through the present.
  2. The Clock of eras is a graphic aid to help us visualize geologic time.

Silurian Period

  1. In this theory, those ranges were thrust up together primarily in the Silurian Period of the Palaeozoic Era, roughly 444-416 MYBP in the Geologic Time Scale.

Division

  1. An epoch is a division of a geologic period; it is the smallest division of geologic time, lasting several million years.
  2. The geologic history of South America can be summarized in three different developmental stages, each corresponding to a major division of geologic time.
  3. This category contains events which happened in the Proterozoic, a division of the geologic time scale.

Geochronology

  1. Both physical and historical geology include three areas: (1) Geochronology is the study of geologic time.

Continental Drift

  1. According to the theory of continental drift, the world was made up of a single continent through most of geologic time.

Home Range

  1. B. A population may move out from its home range over geologic time, as by continental drift.

Years

  1. Between the years of 1785 and 1800, James Hutton and William Smith advanced the concept of geologic time and strengthened the belief in an ancient world.

Millions

  1. Shale: at some point in geologic time, surface rocks eroded and weathered, releasing silt and clayey sediments over the course of millions of years.
  2. On a geologic time scale (thousands to millions of years), however, the eruptions have been beneficial.

Fossils

  1. Fossils are excellent indicators of geologic time and are the basis for the science of biostratigraphy.

Mesozoic Mammals

  1. Small size is typical of Mesozoic mammals; of all the mammal fossils known from this interval of geologic time, none is larger that a modern house cat.

Compacted

  1. Coal is formed from plant remains that have been compacted, hardened, chemically altered, and metamorphosed by heat and pressure over geologic time.

Periods

  1. Palaeogene: The earlier of the two periods comprised in the Cenozoic era according to European nomenclature of geologic time.

Precambrian

  1. Precambrian: All geologic time from the beginning of Earth history to 570 million years ago.
  2. Precambrian An informal term to include all geologic time from the beginning of the Earth to the beginning of the Cambrian period 570 million years ago.
  3. An era of geologic time, from the end of the Precambrian to the beginning of the Mesozoic.

Mya

  1. The Permian period is an interval of about 48 million years defined on the geologic time scale as spanning roughly from 299 to 251 million years ago (mya).

Rocks

  1. Relative dating techniques provide geologists abundant evidence of the incredible vastness of geologic time and ancient age of many rocks and formations.

Stratigraphy

  1. A subdiscipline of stratigraphy devoted to studying the ages of rocks and what they reveal about geologic time.
  2. Faunal succession is the fundamental tool of stratigraphy and is the basis for the geologic time scale.

Geology

  1. Today, few discussions in geology can occur without reference to geologic time and plate tectonics.
  2. He classified geologic time into primitive (or primary), secondary, and tertiary periods based on observations of geology in northern Italy.

Geologists

  1. Faunal stages are a subdivision of geologic time used primarily by paleontologists who study fossils rather than by geologists who study rock formations.
  2. The geologic time scale is a sequential arrangement of time units defined by geologists.

Tertiary Period

  1. An era of geologic time from the beginning of the Tertiary period to the present.
  2. Oligocene epoch, third epoch of the Tertiary period in the Cenozoic era of geologic time, lasting from 38 to 24 million years ago.

Mesozoic Era

  1. Britannica online encyclopedia article on Cretaceous Period (geochronology), in geologic time, the last of the three periods of the Mesozoic Era.
  2. The Permian Period is followed in geologic time by start of the Triassic Period of the Mesozoic Era.
  3. The Cretaceous period is the third of the three divisions of the Mesozoic era of the geologic time scale.

Epochs

  1. Comprising all geologic time from the end of the Tertiary period to the present, it is divided into the Pleistocene and Holocene, or Recent, epochs.
  2. TWO DIFFERENT VIEWS FEATURED: One view (Geologic Time Scale) shows the names of eons, eras, periods, and epochs and their corresponding dates.
  3. Geologists use even smaller time units known as epochs, most commonly in the more recent parts of geologic time.

Time

  1. This includes about 90% of all geologic time and spans the time from the beginning of the earth, about 4.5 billion years ago, to 544 million years ago.
  2. Before scientific methods were used to find out about geologic time, ideas about time and earth history came from religious theories.
  3. The following table summarizes the major events and characteristics of the periods of time making up the geologic time scale.

Paleozoic Era

  1. In geologic time, the Devonian Period, the fourth period of the Paleozoic Era, covers the time roughly 410 million years ago (mya) until 360 mya.

Geologic Time

  1. Maybe speaking in geologic time, the granite bubbles did indeed rise to the surface around the same time, just that time period may be millions of years.
  2. In geologic time, the Paleozoic Era, the first era in the Phanerozoic Eon, covers the time between roughly 544 million years ago (mya) and until 245 mya.
  3. Paleozoic era, a major division (era) of geologic time (see Geologic Timescale, table) occurring between 570 to 240 million years ago.

Categories

  1. Paleozoic Era
  2. Epochs
  3. Mesozoic Era
  4. Eons
  5. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Places > Earth > Geologists
  6. Books about "Geologic Time" in Amazon.com

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  Short phrases about "Geologic Time"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
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