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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Glossaries > Glossary of African-American History /   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY
ABOLITIONISM
ABOLITIONISTS
ABOLITIONIST MOVEMENT
ABRAHAM LINCOLN BRIGADE
AFRICAN AMERICAN ART
AFRICAN AMERICAN CONTEMPORARY ISSUES
AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE
AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE
AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSIC
AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES
AFRICAN AMERICAN VERNACULAR ENGLISH
AFRICAN BLOOD BROTHERHOOD
AFRICAN BURIAL GROUND
AFRICAN SLAVE TRADE
AFRICAN AMERICAN
AFRICAN GROVE
AIDS IN THE UNITED STATES
AMERICAN NEGRO LEAGUE
AMY JACQUES GARVEY
ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE
AUDUBON BALLROOM
BASEBALL COLOR LINE
BLACK HEBREW ISRAELITES
BLACK LIBERATION ARMY
BLACK PANTHER PARTY
BLACKFACE
BLACK CABINET
BLACK CONSERVATISM
BLACK HEBREWS
BLACK JEWS
BLACK MUSLIM
BLACK NATIONALISM
BLACK POPULISM
BLACK POWER
BLACK SEMINOLES
BOARD
BOOKER WASHINGTON
BUFFALO SOLDIER
CARL STOKES
CLOTEL
CONGRESSIONAL BLACK CAUCUS
DAISY BATES
DEACONS FOR DEFENSE AND JUSTICE
DELTA CULTURAL CENTER
DRED SCOTT
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Glossary of African-American History"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

African-American History

  1. African-American History was chosen as a topic because of its importance, popularity and the wealth of Internet resources available on the topic. (Web site)
  2. African-American History: The Black Panthers - Documents and interviews in reference to the original Black Panther Party of the 1960s and early 1970s. (Web site)
  3. African-American history is one of the topics in focus at Global Oneness. (Web site)

Abolitionism

  1. Abolitionism is a former featured article candidate. (Web site)
  2. Abolitionism is a political movement that seeks to end the practice of slavery and the worldwide slave trade. (Web site)
  3. Abolitionism was a feature of an era marked by various approaches to deal with society's outcasts.
  4. Abolitionism was a political movement that sought to abolish the practice of slavery and the worldwide slave trade.
  5. Abolitionism was a political movement that sought to end the practice of slavery and the worldwide slave trade.

Abolitionists

  1. Abolitionists are to be distinguished from free-soilers, who opposed the extension of slavery. (Web site)
  2. Abolitionists is a hip hop collective with eight members, all of whom put out solo material.
  3. Abolitionists were angered further when the Supreme Court ruled against them in the Dred Scott case of 1857.
  4. Abolitionists were just as confused about the means they should use. (Web site)
  5. The abolitionists were alarmed to see Catholics were growing rapidly, especially in the larger cities, where they were becoming politically powerful. (Web site)

Abolitionist Movement

  1. The abolitionist movement was composed of thousands of people who devoted significant portions of their lives to ending slavery. (Web site)
  2. The abolitionist movement was strengthened by the activities of free African Americans, especially in the black church.

Abraham Lincoln Brigade

  1. The Abraham Lincoln Brigade was made up of volunteers from all walks of American life, and from all classes. (Web site)

African American Art

  1. African American art is a Neo-Western art form. (Web site)
  2. African American art is a broad term describing the visual arts of the American black community. (Web site)

African American Contemporary Issues

  1. African American contemporary issues are a group of social, political.

African American Culture

  1. African American culture is a degradation in Diawara's conceptualization.
  2. African American culture is a distinct part of American culture.
  3. African American culture is an amalgam of influences, including African , Caribbean , European , and Latino cultures.
  4. African American culture is an amalgam of influences, including Caribbean, European, African and Latino cultures.
  5. African American culture is an amalgam of influences, the most persistent of which has been the cultural imprint of Africa.

African American Literature

  1. African American literature is the body of literature produced in the USA by writers of African descent. (Web site)
  2. African American literature is the body of literature produced in the United States by writers of African descent.

African American Music

  1. African American music is a profound expression of what it means to be black in America.
  2. African American music is a subcategory under African American culture, and it quite rightly rates its own entry.
  3. African American music is one of the most pervasive African American cultural influences in the United States today.
  4. African American music is one of the most pervasive cultural influences in the United States today. (Web site)
  5. African American music was also deeply affected by the social currents of the 1920s.

African American Studies

  1. African American Studies is a classical liberal arts minor.
  2. African American Studies is a systematic study of the racial, cultural and ethnic experiences of people of African heritage.
  3. African American Studies is an interdisciplinary program that offers two major tracks and a minor.

African American Vernacular English

  1. Linguist William Labov carried out and published the first thorough grammatical study of African American Vernacular English in 1965. (Web site)
  2. From the standpoint of linguistic evolution, African American Vernacular English is no different than any of these instances.
  3. African American Vernacular English (AAVE) is a dialect of English spoken by many African Americans to varying degrees.

African Blood Brotherhood

  1. This article gives an extensive look at the formation and ideals of the African Blood Brotherhood during the Harlem Renaissance.
  2. One such group, the African Blood Brotherhood, later claimed to have had a chapter in Greenwood prior to the riot. (Web site)
  3. Instead, the African Blood Brotherhood led resistance to the white mob and challenged the idea that blacks could be easily intimidated.

African Burial Ground

  1. The African Burial Ground is a cemetery that was used between the late 1600s and 1796. (Web site)
  2. The African Burial Ground is a crucial story of America, one that has been forgotten too long.
  3. The African Burial Ground is a five- or six-acre cemetery that was used between the late 1600s and 1796 and originally contained 10,000 to 20,000 burials.
  4. The African Burial Ground is a five-to-six acre site located in New York City.
  5. The African Burial Ground is a reminder of the contribution of African people, both slave and free, to the building of New York City.

African Slave Trade

  1. The African slave trade was facilitated by this financial colossus. (Web site)

African American

  1. Some criticism has arisen with the use of the term "African American".
  2. If a caucasian is born in Africa also has roots in America, that person is deserving of the term "African American" also. (Web site)
  3. The term "African American" doesn't usually invoke images north of the 49th parallel, but it should. (Web site)

African Grove

  1. The African Grove was a theater founded and operated by African Americans in New York. (Web site)

Aids In The United States

  1. AIDS in the United States is a much bigger problem amoung men than amoung women. (Web site)

American Negro League

  1. American Negro League lasted just one season 1929 created from some of the ECL teams.
  2. In 1927, the Eastern League folded, but was quickly reformed into the American Negro League.
  3. The ECL collapsed in the spring of 1928 but the member teams reemerged in 1929 as the American Negro League.

Amy Jacques Garvey

  1. Amy Jacques Garvey was an international organizer and race leader in her own right. (Web site)
  2. Amy Jacques Garvey was one of the pioneer Black female journalists and publishers of the 20th century, a fact that is often overlooked by historians.
  3. Amy Jacques Garvey was one of the pioneer Black women journalists and publishers of the 20th century, a fact that is often overlooked by historians.

Atlantic Slave Trade

  1. The Atlantic Slave Trade was in some ways an extension of a much older Mediterranean slave trade. (Web site)
  2. The Atlantic slave trade was not the only slave trade taking a toll on Africa, although the largest in volume and intensity. (Web site)
  3. The Atlantic slave trade was shaped and driven by commercial forces of profit and new patterns of consumption. (Web site)
  4. The Atlantic slave trade was the capture and transport of black Africans into bondage and servitude in the New World. (Web site)

Audubon Ballroom

  1. The Audubon Ballroom was the site of early efforts to organize the municipal transit workers of New York City. (Web site)

Baseball Color Line

  1. The Baseball color line was the unwritten policy that excluded African American baseball players from Organized Ball in the United States before 1947.
  2. The Baseball color line was the unwritten policy which excluded African American baseball players from Organized Ball in the United States before 1947. (Web site)

Black Hebrew Israelites

  1. Among them, the Black Hebrew Israelites of Yahweh Ben Yahweh have their own profile on this website.
  2. As I mentioned in the beginning of this article it is difficult to pinpoint one set of doctrinal beliefs for Black Hebrew Israelites.
  3. Black Hebrew Israelites, a black supremacist group, typify the use of numerology from the Book of Revelation. (Web site)

Black Liberation Army

  1. Assata Shakur is an activist and member of the Black Panther Party and Black Liberation Army, for which the FBI hunted and harassed her.
  2. John Young is killed when suspected Black Liberation Army members storm Ingleside Station and fire a shotgun through a small opening in a bulletproof window.

Black Panther Party

  1. The Black Panther Party was a disciplined and organized revolutionary political entity.

Blackface

  1. Blackface is a distinctly American term and was used primarily in America. (Web site)
  2. Blackface is an appropriation -- of a "black" identity.
  3. Blackface was an important performance tradition in the American theater for over 100 years and was also popular overseas.
  4. Blackface was invented by a white comedian, Thomas D. Rice, who introduced the song " Jump Jim Crow " and an accompanying dance in his act in 1828. (Web site)
  5. Blackface was not just entertainment, but a symbolic inversion of social order. (Web site)

Black Cabinet

  1. Diversity of "black cabinet." Contribution of educator Mary McLeon Bethune & others.
  2. Weaver was the first black cabinet member in American history as President Johnson's Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.
  3. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt encouraged the organization of a 'Black Cabinet' composed of notable African Americans to help shape New Deal programs.

Black Conservatism

  1. At the core of militant black conservatism is a pathological view of the masses of African Americans.
  2. So-called black conservatism lacks the political ganas to apply conservative values to white folks.

Black Hebrews

  1. First, note that the term "Black Hebrews" is not appreciated (although used) by most individuals in such communiites. (Web site)
  2. I've heard of a group called the "Black Hebrews". (Web site)
  3. In the United States, some groups of Black Jews use the term "black hebrews". (Web site)
  4. Jews as a Nation: I've heard of a group called the "Black Hebrews". (Web site)
  5. Question 13.7: I've heard of a group called the "Black Hebrews". (Web site)

Black Jews

  1. Black Jews is a term sometimes used to refer to the Beta Israel, the ancient black Jewish community of Ethiopia.
  2. The Black Jews are descendants of the already-then-existent Jewish community, which, according to tradition, dates back to the time of King Solomon.

Black Muslim

  1. Black Muslim is a term that became associated with the Nation of Islam but is now considered derogatory and should be avoided. (Web site)

Black Nationalism

  1. Black Nationalism is a complex set of beliefs emphasizing the need for the cultural, political, and economic independence of African Americans.
  2. Black Nationalism was one response to this situation.
  3. Black nationalism is a complete set of beliefs emphasizing cultural, political, and economic independence for African Americans.
  4. Black nationalism is a complex set of beliefs emphasizing cultural, political, and economic independence for African Americans.
  5. Black nationalism is a political and social movement arising in the 1960s and early '70s mostly among African Americans in the United States.

Black Populism

  1. Black Populism was destroyed, marking the end of organized political resistance to the return of White supremacy in the South in the late nineteenth century.

Black Power

  1. As far back as I can remember, I have been fascinated by what has been called the "Black Power" movement. (Web site)
  2. Black Power is a cry of pain.
  3. Black Power is a distinct contribution to the new scholarship on the Black freedom movement.
  4. Black Power is a political slogan that embodies the aspirations and drive for empowerment of and full self-determination for African people.
  5. Black Power is a slogan which describes the aspiration of many Africans (whether they be in Africa or abroad) to national self-determination.

Black Seminoles

  1. The Black Seminoles are descendants of free African Americans and fugitive slaves traditionally allied with Seminole Indians in Florida and Oklahoma. (Web site)
  2. The Black Seminoles were not slaves of the Seminole.
  3. The black Seminoles were of African origin who assimilated with many North American indigenous groups from the Florida region.

Board

  1. Board was a catastrophe". (Web site)
  2. Board was brought before the U.S. Supreme Court as a combination of five cases from various parts of the country, representing nearly 200 hundred plaintiffs.
  3. Board was one of defining moments of the modern-day American Civil Rights Movement.
  4. Board was one of defining moments of the modern-day Civil Rights Movement.

Booker Washington

  1. Booker Washington was the founder and first president of Tuskegee Institute (1881).

Buffalo Soldier

  1. Buffalo soldier was the name given to African American soldiers by Native Americans.
  2. The Buffalo Soldier is a great story. (Web site)
  3. The Buffalo Soldier is an awe-inspiring tale, profound and with an ethical aura to it that readers would appreciate.

Carl Stokes

  1. Carl Stokes served as Mayor of Cleveland from 1967 to 1971, and was also a municipal judge and U.S. Ambassador.
  2. This program explores the political path to power for Carl Stokes, the nation's first black mayor of a major city. (Web site)
  3. Arnold Pinkney: Anytime you went up against Carl Stokes, you knew you were going up against someone who wanted to win.

Clotel

  1. Clotel is a highly unusual case among early African American novels.
  2. Clotel is a quadroon girl who becomes the mistress of her white owner.
  3. Clotel is a work of fiction whose heroine is the illegitimate black daughter of President Thomas Jefferson.
  4. Clotel is based on the now-substantiated rumor about the child that President Thomas Jefferson created with Sally Hemings, one of his slaves.
  5. Clotel is one of the first novels to address the sexual exploitation that many black American slave women faced. (Web site)

Congressional Black Caucus

  1. The Congressional Black Caucus is a bigoted travesty and a throw-back to the days of the Ku Klux Klan.
  2. The Congressional Black Caucus is a bunch of gerrymandered petty chieftains, who lost their institutional clout when the GOP took Congress.
  3. The Congressional Black Caucus is probably the closest group of legislators on the Hill. (Web site)

Daisy Bates

  1. Daisy Bates was a civil rights activist and advisor for the famous Little Rock Nine who were chosen to integrate Central High School in Little Rock Arkansas. (Web site)
  2. Daisy Bates was also the president of the state conference of the NAACP from1952-59.

Deacons For Defense And Justice

  1. The Deacons for Defense and Justice were a fl self-defense group with a fascinating history.
  2. The Deacons for Defense and Justice were an armed African American civil rights organization in the U.S. Southern states during the 1960s.

Delta Cultural Center

  1. The Delta Cultural Center is a museum dedicated to the history of the Arkansas Delta.

Dred Scott

  1. Dred Scott is a case about threats to national security and whether the Constitution is a suicide pact.
  2. Dred Scott was Dr. Emerson's property, and Emerson wanted to take him along. (Web site)
  3. Dred Scott was a 62-year-old slave who sued for his freedom on the ground that he had lived in a territory where slavery was forbidden.
  4. Dred Scott was a of mixed race and he still experienced full racism back then.
  5. Dred Scott was a slave in Missouri. (Web site)

Related Keywords

    * Eastern Colored League * Edward Wilmot Blyden * Elaine Race Riot * Eldridge Cleaver * Elijah Muhammad * Emancipation Proclamation * Ferguson * Foster * Frederick Douglass * Free African Society * Free Negro * Fugitive * Game * Garveyism * Giants * Glenville Shootout * Greensboro Four * Gullah * Harlem Hellfighters * Harlem Renaissance * Harriet Tubman * Henry Highland Garnet * Henry Johnson * Historically Black Colleges And Universities * Hough Riots * Huntington High * Hush Harbor * Jackie Robinson * James Forten * Jim Crow Law * John Edward Bruce * John Hunn * Kansas-Nebraska Act * Kwanzaa * Laws * League of Struggle For Negro Rights * Leah Chase * Legislation * Letter From Birmingham Jail * Malcolm * Marcus Garvey * Marcus Mosiah Garvey * Martin Delany * Millions More Movement * Million Man March * Minstrel Show * Missouri Compromise * Montgomery Bus Boycott * Naacp * Naacp Legal Defense And Educational Fund * National Association of Colored Women * National Council of Negro Women * National League * Nation of Islam * Negrophobia * Negro American League * Negro Leagues * Negro League Baseball * Negro League Teams * Negro League World Series * Negro World * One-Drop Theory * Organization of Afro-American Unity * Pan-African Colors * Players * Plessy * Polly Berry * Posey * Pullman Company * Racial Integration * Racial Segregation * Radical Republican * Reconstruction * Rickey * Robinson * Samuel Cornish * Samuel Gravely * Scipio Africanus Jones * Season * Separate But Equal * Shabazz * Slavery * Slaves * Slave Rebellion * Stars * Supreme Court * Team * Teams * The Black Star Line * The Nation of Gods And Earths * Triangular Trade * Tulsa Race Riot * Tuskegee Airmen * Underground Railroad * Unia * Unia Members * United Negro College Fund * United States Colored Troops * Up From Slavery * Vivien Thomas * Voting Rights Act * William Lynch Speech * William Wells Brown
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  Short phrases about "Glossary of African-American History"
  Originally created: September 06, 2007.
  Links checked: July 08, 2013.
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