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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Glossaries > Glossary of Japanese Writers /   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
JAPANESE WRITERS
JAPANESE AUTHORS
BANANA YOSHIMOTO
IHARA SAIKAKU
KAWABATA YASUNARI
MURASAKI SHIKIBU
SENRYU
TANKA
YASUNARI KAWABATA
ABE KOBO
AKAGAWA JIRO
AKUTAGAWA RYUNOSUKE
AMERICAN
ANTHOLOGY
ARIYOSHI SAWAKO
ARTICLE
BASHO
BLOGGERS
CANADIAN
CHIKAMATSU MONZAEMON
CHINESE CHARACTERS
DAISETZ TEITARO SUZUKI
DAZAI OSAMU
DIARISTS
DONALD KEENE
EMMA
ENGLISH
ESSAYISTS
FUKUZAWA YUKICHI
FUTABATEI SHIMEI
GENJI
HAGIWARA SAKUTARO
HAIKU
HEIDI
HIDEYUKI KIKUCHI
HIGUCHI ICHIYO
HIROTADA OTOTAKE
HIRO YAMAGATA
HISAO JURAN
HISTORIANS
HOKKU
INOUE
INOUE YASUSHI
ISHIHARA SHINTARO
IZUMI KYOKA
JOURNAL
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Glossary of Japanese Writers"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Japanese Writers

  1. Japanese writers are either writers of Japanese ethnicity, working primarily in Japan , or primarily in the Japanese language .

Japanese Authors

  1. Japanese authors are either author s of Japanese ethnicity, working primarily in Japan, or primarily in the Japanese language.
  2. Japanese authors are either authors of Japanese ethnicity, working primarily in Japan, or primarily in the Japanese language.

Banana Yoshimoto

  1. Banana Yoshimoto is a Japanese writer of pop fiction .
  2. Banana Yoshimoto is a master storyteller.
  3. Banana Yoshimoto is a popular writer among young Japanese ladies. (Web site)
  4. Banana Yoshimoto is a truly phenomenal Japanese writer .
  5. Banana Yoshimoto is a young Japanese writer, and apparently no one else has the name Banana. (Web site)

Ihara Saikaku

  1. Ihara Saikaku was born Hirayama Togo in Osaka in 1642, and little is known about his early life.
  2. Ihara Saikaku was a poet and writer of popular fiction born into a thriving merchant family in Osaka in 1642.

Kawabata Yasunari

  1. In 1968 Kawabata Yasunari became the first Japanese to win the Nobel Prize for literature, and Oe Kenzaburo won it in 1994.
  2. D'ANGELO, Paola, La metafora del “Chijimi” ne “Il paese delle nevi” di Kawabata Yasunari, «Asiaorientale», 9, 1990, pp.
  3. Japan's turn to win the Nobel Prize in Literature arrived in 1968, but Kawabata Yasunari and not Mishima received it.

Murasaki Shikibu

  1. Murasaki Shikibu is the best known writer to emerge from Japan's glorious Heian period. (Web site)
  2. Murasaki Shikibu was a Japanese writer of the late Heian period.
  3. Murasaki Shikibu was a Novelist, Poet, and servant of the Emperor of Japan during the Heian Period. (Web site)
  4. Murasaki Shikibu was a courtier and is regarded as one of the greatest authors of narrative prose in Japanese literature.
  5. Murasaki Shikibu was born in a middle-level family of nobility during the middle of the Heian Period. (Web site)

Senryu

  1. Senryu is a similar poetry form that emphasizes humor and human foibles instead of seasons, and which may not have kigo or kireji.
  2. Senryu is a similar poetry form that emphasizes humor and human foibles instead of seasons.
  3. Senryu is a similar poetry form that emphasizes humor instead of seasons. (Web site)
  4. Senryu is a style of satirical poetry whose motifs are taken from daily life in 5-7-5 syllables.

Tanka

  1. Tanka is a much older form of Japanese poetry than haiku. (Web site)
  2. Tanka was originally the shorter form of Japanese formal poetry, and was used more heavily to explore personal rather than public themes. (Web site)
  3. Tanka: A Japanese poem of five lines, the first and third composed of five.
  4. The Tanka is a form of Japanese poetry, generally not possessing rhyme, with five lines structured in a 5-7-5 7-7 patterns.

Yasunari Kawabata

  1. Yasunari Kawabata is the first Japanese writer to be awarded the Noble Prize for Literature.
  2. Yasunari Kawabata is a god, read everything he wrote.
  3. Yasunari Kawabata is a great novelist.
  4. Yasunari Kawabata is a writer I admire immensely.
  5. Yasunari Kawabata was born in Osaka on June 11, 1899, into a cultured family, his father being a doctor of medicine. (Web site)

Abe Kobo

  1. Contains great moments: the epic "Never-ending Story", "You", "Boxman" (a series of short dialogues based on the writings of Japanese writer Abe Kobo), etc.
  2. The Donald Keen Center of Japanese Culture held a month-long cultural appreciation of Abe Kobo as its tenth anniversary, in April 1996. (Web site)

Akagawa Jiro

  1. Based on the story by Akagawa Jiro.
  2. The fact that best-selling writer Akagawa Jiro is from Fukuoka might come as a surprise.
  3. One of my favorite authors is Akagawa Jiro, a famous Japanese mystery writer. (Web site)

Akutagawa Ryunosuke

  1. Akutagawa Ryunosuke was born in 1892 and died by his own hand in 1927.
  2. Akutagawa Ryunosuke was one of Japan's most famous short-story writers.

American

  1. Kishi italicized the word "American" to signify that this was his reason for including the work in the table.
  2. The American are sick and tired of the pretense of ersatz “free” government of it’s first colony. (Web site)

Anthology

  1. The anthology was my own idea, and it is difficult for me to express how much I am enjoying translating Hearn's beautiful prose.
  2. The anthology was named Shin-kokin Wakashu.

Ariyoshi Sawako

  1. And, with the exception of Ariyoshi Sawako, all men. (Web site)
  2. The musical, a work by famous Japanese writer and director Ariyoshi Sawako, has played 500 times since its debut in 1975. (Web site)

Article

  1. The article is one of Ueno's first on the topic. (Web site)
  2. The article is one of the first that Ueno published on the topic. (Web site)

Basho

  1. Basho was Japan's most famous poet.
  2. Basho: A Japanese poet who lived from 1644 to 1694, who became famous for.
  3. Basho was pivotal in the evolution of the haiku. (Web site)
  4. Basho was the master of the haiku - the 3 line poem unique to Japan, which has fascinated poets from other cultures. (Web site)

Bloggers

  1. Bloggers are fond of making sweeping statements, according to an observation by Lifespy blogger Alex Maximo on his personal blog.

Canadian

  1. A Canadian is a big fat street party on the Danforth in Toronto, 2004.
  2. A Canadian is a foreigner who isn’ t a foreigner.
  3. A Canadian is a group of more than four thousand people who were exiled for no crime.
  4. A Canadian is a transplanted snail called James who sat down on a brick.

Chikamatsu Monzaemon

  1. Chikamatsu Monzaemon is a great writer of Jorurui (puppet plays) and Kabuki scripts. (Web site)
  2. Chikamatsu Monzaemon was famous for the plays he wrote for the bunraku (puppet theatre) and kabuki stages. (Web site)

Chinese Characters

  1. Chinese characters were later adapted to write Japanese, creating what is known as the man'yogana, the earliest form of kana, or syllabic writing.
  2. Chinese characters were later adapted to write Japanese, creating what is known as the man'y--gana, the earliest form of kana, or syllabic writing. (Web site)

Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki

  1. Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki was no ordinary man.

Dazai Osamu

  1. Dazai Osamu was born Tsushima Shuji in Kanagi, in northern Honshu, as the tenth of eleven children. (Web site)
  2. Dazai Osamu was born in Kanagi, in northern Honshu, as the tenth of eleven children.

Diarists

  1. Information and internet links for historical and literary diaries and diarists.
  2. This is a list of diarists. (Web site)
  3. We will examine short excerpts from elegant published work by memoirists, essayists, diarists, travel writers, and journalists.

Donald Keene

  1. Donald Keene is a genius who has done more for Japanese literature and culture than anybody else in the world.
  2. Donald Keene was born on June 6th 1922.

Emma

  1. Emma was asked by several, including Lizzie & William Holmes, Abe Isaak, & Susan Patton, to present papers at the Congress. (Web site)
  2. Emma was the principal speaker & the paper attributed to her a statement favoring the assassination of Italy's King Umberto. (Web site)

English

  1. English is the collective work of millions of people throughout the ages.
  2. English is the only European language that used to boast two, and that now boasts three.
  3. Footnotes Note 1: The term "English" in the context of this article also includes Welsh and Norman authors who wrote about history relevant to England.
  4. The term "English" in the context of this article also includes Welsh and Norman authors who wrote about history relevant to England.

Essayists

  1. Others are poets, short story writers, dramatists, essayists, or writers of historical novels or memoirs.
  2. Pages in category "English essayists " There are 74 pages in this section of this category.

Fukuzawa Yukichi

  1. Fukuzawa Yukichi was a member of the first ever Japanese delegation to the United States, in 1860 (Washington shipyard).
  2. Fukuzawa Yukichi was a member of the first ever Japanese delegation to the United States, in 1860. (Web site)
  3. Fukuzawa Yukichi was born in 1834 in the province of Bungo (Kyushu) into a lower level samurai family.

Futabatei Shimei

  1. Futabatei Shimei was his pen name.

Genji

  1. Genji is simply another way to read the Chinese characters for the real-life Minamoto clan, to which Genji was made to belong.
  2. Genji was the second son of a certain ancient emperor and a low-ranking concubine.
  3. Genji was very different, but I persevered until I actually got to the end.
  4. The Genji was a wide and deep source of nourishment for poetry, of course, and for the fine arts and handicrafts as well, and even for landscape gardening. (Web site)

Hagiwara Sakutaro

  1. Hagiwara Sakutaro was born in 1886 and started writing poetry while still at school.

Haiku

  1. A haiku is a short poem "in which Nature is linked to human nature," according to a Haiku Society of America definition. (Web site)
  2. A haiku is the expression of a temporary enlightenment, in which we see into the life of things. (Web site)
  3. Haiku are expensive.
  4. Haiku is a mode of Japanese poetry, the late 19th century revision by Masaoka Shiki of the older , the opening verse of a linked verse form, haikai no renga.
  5. Haiku is a seventeen-syllable Japanese poetic form divided into three phrases: five syllables, seven syllables, and five syllables.

Heidi

  1. Heidi is an orphan, who hates her Aunt, who had been raising her.
  2. Heidi was my favorite character because she was always happy, even through tough times and getting used to things that she did not normally do.

Hideyuki Kikuchi

  1. Hideyuki Kikuchi's crackling narrative and Yoshitaka Amano's imaginative artwork make this a must-read entry in the series.
  2. Before the Animatrix, he also directed Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust which was also based by a novel by Hideyuki Kikuchi. (Web site)

Higuchi Ichiyo

  1. One of the most impressive works of fiction in this style was the story "Takekurabe" (1895–1896; "Growing Up") by Higuchi Ichiyo.
  2. Higuchi Ichiyo, a rare woman writer in this era, wrote short stories on powerless women of this age in a simple style in between literary and colloquial. (Web site)
  3. Ozaki Koyo, Izumi Kyoka, and Higuchi Ichiyo represent a strain of writers whose style hearkens back to early-Modern Japanese literature.

Hirotada Ototake

  1. Hirotada Ototake is a stylish, charming 23-year-old student at Waseda University, who enjoys baseball and American football.
  2. Hirotada Ototake was born with no limbs.

Hiro Yamagata

  1. Hiro Yamagata is a laser artist, a Renaissance man of technology and science. (Web site)

Hisao Juran

  1. Hisao Juran was a pioneer in the use of black humor in Japanese literature. (Web site)
  2. Hisao Juran was married to the niece of Osaragi Jiro 's wife. (Web site)

Historians

  1. Historians are not unaware of these challenges to the ways that we work.

Hokku

  1. And finally, he discarded the term "hokku" and called his revised verse form "haiku".
  2. Hokku was not so much a serious matter for Buson as it was for Bashō.
  3. Hokku was not so much a serious matter for Buson as it was for Basho. (Web site)
  4. Hokku was only the first verse of haikai, but its position as the opening verse made it the most important, setting the tone for the whole composition. (Web site)
  5. Hokku was the "greeting" to get the linked verse started.

Inoue

  1. Inoue is an ardent student of history.
  2. Inoue was born in 1934 in a small town in Yamagata Prefecture . (Web site)
  3. Inoue was known then primarily as a popular writer of humorous fiction and as the most clever player on words in contemporary literature and theater.

Inoue Yasushi

  1. Inoue Yasushi also turned to the past in masterful historical novels of Inner Asia and ancient Japan, in order to portray present human fate. (Web site)
  2. He has published numerous translations of modern Japanese literature, including works by Nagai Kafu, Shiga Naoya, Inoue Yasushi, and others.

Ishihara Shintaro

  1. Ishihara Shintaro is a case in point.
  2. Tokyo Governor Ishihara Shintaro outlines in detail the good and bad of postwar Japan.

Izumi Kyoka

  1. Two of his best-known disciples were the romantic-short-story writer Izumi Kyoka and the naturalistic novelist Tokuda Shusei.
  2. The Izumi Kyoka Prize is a literary award established by the city of Kanazawa, first awarded on the hundredth anniversary of Ky--ka's birth in 1973. (Web site)
  3. Ozaki Koyo, Izumi Kyoka, and Higuchi Ichiyo represent a strain of writers whose style hearkens back to early-Modern Japanese literature.

Journal

  1. Many people now prefer the word "journal" so as to avoid this stereotype and to expand the diary's use beyond a mere catalog of events.
  2. Now, many people prefer the word "journal" so as to avoid this stereotype and to expand the diary's use beyond a mere catalog of events.

Related Keywords

    * Kabuki * Kafka * Kakinomoto Hitomaro * Kamo No Chomei * Kawajiri * Kawakami Hiromi * Kikuchi Kan * Kitahara Hakushu * Ki No Tsurayuki * Kobayashi Issa * Kobayashi Takiji * Kobo Abe * Kyoka * Kyotaro Nishimura * Lafcadio Hearn * Literature * Masaoka Shiki * Masato Kato * Material * Mishima * Miyazawa Kenji * Mori * Nakahara Chuya * Narrator * Novelists * Ooka Shohei * Otomo No Yakamochi * Poems * Poet * Poetry * Poets * Romanticism * Ryokan * Ryunosuke Akutagawa * Ryu Murakami * Sakutaro Hagiwara * Shiga Naoya * Shimazaki Toson * Short Stories * Short Story * Site * Stories * Style * Suematsu Kencho * Sugawara No Takasue No Musume * Tachihara * Tanizaki Junichiro * Tawada Yoko * Tawara Machi * Tetsu Yano * Ueda Akinari * Verne * Writer * Writer Stubs * Yamamura Bocho * Yanagawa * Yokomitsu Riichi * Yosano Akiko * Yosa Buson * Yoshikawa Eiji * Yoshimoto Banana * Yuriko Miyamoto
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  Short phrases about "Glossary of Japanese Writers"
  Originally created: November 21, 2007.
  Links checked: June 02, 2013.
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