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Glossary of Polynesian mythology       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Glossaries > Glossary of Polynesian Mythology /   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
ARAHUTA
SHARK
AUAHI-TUROA
AHOEITU
AI KANAKA
ATEA
ATONGA
ATU
ATUA
AUMAKUA
AUPARU
AURIARIA
AVAIKI
AVAIKI TAUTAU
AVATAR
BULOTU
EASTER ISLAND
EAU
EAU CLAIRE
FIJI
FIJIAN MYTHOLOGY
HAKA
HAVOA
HAWAIKI
HEAVENS
HEMA
HINE
HINE-KAU-ATAATA
HIRO
ILA
ILAHEVA
IVA
KAHOMOVAILAHI
KAI-N-TIKU-ABA
KAI TANGATA
KANAE
KANE MILOHAI
KAPO
KAPUA
KAPUKU
KARIHI
KNOCKHILL
KON-TIKI
KUMU-HONUA
KUMULIPO
KUPE
LALO-HONUA
LIMU
LUA-O-MILU
MAERO
MAHIKI
MAHIUKI
MAKUTU
MALES
MANA
MANAWA
MANA POOLS
MAOHI
MARIKORIKO
MATUKU
MATUKU TAGO TAGO
MENEHUNE
MILU
MOTHER
NANA-ULA
NGA-ATUA
NGANAOA
NGARO
NGARU
NIGHTMARCHERS
NOTE
PAHUANUI
PALIULI
PANIA
PAPA
PELE
POLYNESIAN DEITIES
POLYNESIAN MYTHOLOGY
PONATURI
POUKAI
PUA TU TAHI
PUKATALA
RANGI
RATA
REHUA
ROHI
RONGO
SAMOA
SAMOANS
SAVALI
TAHEKEROA
TAIRI
TANGAROA
TANGOTANGO
TANIWHA
TAPAIRU
TARINGA NUI
TAWHIRI
TE TOI-O-NGA-RANGI
TEVAKE
THEWORDBOOK
TIKI
TIKIS
TIPUA
TONGA
TONGA-HITI
TONGATEA
TUKOIO
TUMUITEARETOKA
TUNA
TUREHU
UEKERA
UPOLU
UROTONGA
VATEA
VITU
WAHIE ROA
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Glossary of Polynesian Mythology"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Arahuta

  1. Category: Polynesian mythology (unverified), M--ori mythology, Oceania mythology stubs The article "Arahuta" is part of the Wikipedia encyclopedia.
  2. Search Results Tangotango In Polynesian mythology, Tangotango is a woman who had intercourse with Tawhaki and was the mother of Arahuta.
  3. He eventually reached the sixth of twelve heavens, Nga-Atua, and was reunited with his late lover, Tangotango, and their daughter Arahuta. (Web site)

Shark

  1. The Shark was a popular Aumakua in the Cook Islands, and Tangaloa was the people's deity.
  2. The name "Shark" first came into use around the late 1560s to refer to the large sharks of the Caribbean Sea, and later to all sharks in general. (Web site)
  3. The shark was killed, but the menehune never again swam in that bay. (Web site)

Auahi-Turoa

  1. She married Auahi-Turoa and together they had five children, named for the five fingers on the human hand, called collectively Ng-- M--nawa.
  2. In Polynesian mythology, the Manawa were the five sons of Mahu-ike and Auahi-Turoa.
  3. I've redirected Mahu-ike as you suggested and supplemented Mahuika from your updated Auahi-Turoa entry. (Web site)

Ahoeitu

  1. In Polynesian mythology (specifically: Tonga), Ilaheva is a worm -descendant and the mother of Ahoeitu by Eitumatupua.
  2. In Polynesian mythology (specifically: Tonga), Eitumatupua is a sky god who once climbed down to Earth on a tree and fathered Ahoeitu by Ilaheva.
  3. Eitumatupua forced them to regurgitate the pieces, and he then made Ahoeitu whole again. (Web site)

Ai Kanaka

  1. She fell in love with Ai Kanaka, a mortal man, and married him. (Web site)
  2. In Polynesian mythology, Lona is a lunar deity who fell in love with and married a mortal, Ai Kanaka.
  3. Makaʻu au i ka nahesa a me ka moʻo ʻai kanaka. (Web site)

Atea

  1. Atea is a municipality (pop.
  2. Atea was made into the sky god and Fa'ahotu became his wife. (Web site)

Atonga

  1. Atonga is a cultural hero from Samoa who invented canoe-building. (Web site)

Atu

  1. Ng-- kai whenua i mua atu ko --r-- i kitea ai e Ngahue, ar-- te moa, ng-- manu o te ngahere, me te aruhe.
  2. Ua tau atu a o fai le suavai a le aiga.
  3. Ona ia talosaga atu lea ia Tagaloalagi e fesosoani mai.

Atua

  1. An atua is the spirit of an ancestor in Polynesia, who is revered like a god.
  2. Atua are sometimes referred to as Nuku-mai-Tore, the "People of the Other World". (Web site)

Aumakua

  1. Aumakua is a Hawaiian word meaning family or personal god, often a deified ancestor.

Auparu

  1. In the mythology of Rarotonga in the Cook Islands, Auparu ("gentle dew") is a stream, the bathing-place of fairies. (Web site)
  2. In Polynesian mythology (specifically: Rarotonga), Auparu ("gentle dew ") is a stream where Menehune bathed.

Auriaria

  1. Auriaria was about to rest upon his land of Banaba, so he began to set it in order. (Web site)
  2. Auriaria In Gilbertese myth, a great chief, red-skinned and of a giant's stature. (Web site)
  3. Auriaria lay with Nei Anginimaeao: two children were born. (Web site)

Avaiki

  1. Avaiki is one of the many entities by which the people of Polynesia refer to their ancestral and spiritual homelands.
  2. Avaiki was constructed by the gods in a series of strata, with spaces separated by ceilings like caves, and tunnels giving access to its halls. (Web site)

Avaiki Tautau

  1. Avaiki Tautau is a poetic name for New Zealand . (Web site)

Avatar

  1. He (or she) is not an embodiment of a god (as in the traditional meaning of the term "avatar"), but of a set of ethic guidelines called the Virtues. (Web site)
  2. The Avatar is the main (player) character in the Ultima series of games. (Web site)

Bulotu

  1. Bulotu is a place with richly laden fruit trees and beautiful blossoms. (Web site)

Easter Island

  1. Easter Island is one of the world's most isolated inhabited islands.
  2. Easter Island is a province of the Valpara--so Region of Chile.
  3. Easter Island is a volcanic high island, consisting of three extinct volcanoes: Terevaka (altitude 507 metres) forms the bulk of the island.

Eau

  1. It is the county seat of Eau Claire County GR6. Eau Claire is the principal city of eau claire wisconsin and included.
  2. Ben eau claire wisconsin Katz, movie producer (imdb entry), (corporate site)Beth Lacke, actress (imdb entry)John Menard, Jr.
  3. This browser does not support basic Web standards, eau claire wisconsin preventing the display of our sites intended.

Eau Claire

  1. Eau Claire is a city located in the west-central part of the U.S. state of Wisconsin. (Web site)
  2. Eau Claire is a city located in west-central Wisconsin .
  3. Eau Claire is a vital, front porch community where people walk, play, and work together to guarantee the best possible quality of life. (Web site)

Fiji

  1. Fiji is a rich cultural surprise, where the friendly Fijian people will captivate your heart.
  2. Fiji was overcome.

Fijian Mythology

  1. F Fijian mythology P Polynesian deities Articles in category "Polynesian mythology" There are 101 articles in this category.
  2. See also In Melanesia, a similar concept is part of Fijian mythology - see Burotu. (Web site)
  3. In Fijian mythology (specifically: Fiji), Cibaciba and Drakulu are the two cave entrances to the underworld (see Degei).

Haka

  1. A haka is a traditional dance form of the M--ori of New Zealand. (Web site)
  2. The haka is a traditional genre of M--ori dance. (Web site)

Havoa

  1. Havoa returned 55 results total on google.
  2. Please search for Havoa in Wikipedia to check for alternative titles or spellings. (Web site)
  3. Indian Ocean Islands : Explore Madagascar Stop at Ambalavao to visit Antaimoro Paper to see artisans making paper from Havoa tree bark mixed with plants.

Hawaiki

  1. Hawaiki is a paradise where the gods live and perform miraculous deeds.
  2. Hawaiki is a rich, many-sided place in Māori history, mythology and tradition. (Web site)
  3. Hawaiki is a symbol of the distant home whence came the ancestors of the first discoverers of the heart of the Pacific. (Web site)
  4. Hawaiki is a yawn and a stretch from life.
  5. Hawaiki is the mythical island that the Polynesians trace their origins to. (Web site)

Heavens

  1. The Heavens were fast, but are lifted.
  2. The heavens are raised.
  3. The heavens were formerly, it is said, very low, and Maui volunteered to raise them if a woman would give him a draught of water from her gourd.

Hema

  1. Hema was born in Surat, India, and moved to Toronto, Canada at the age of six. (Web site)
  2. Hema was killed by the Ponaturi , and Karihi and his mother, Urotonga, and his younger brother, Tawhaki, killed them all but two in revenge.
  3. Hema was killed by the Ponaturi , and Tawhaki and his mother, Urotonga, and his older brother, Karihi , killed them all but two in revenge.
  4. Hema was killed by the Ponaturi, and Karihi and his mother, Urotonga, and hisyounger brother, Tawhaki, killed them all but two in revenge. (Web site)
  5. Hema was killed by the Ponaturi, and Tawhaki, Karihi and Urutonga killed them all but two in revenge. (Web site)

Hine

  1. HINE was the first mortal woman, created by Tane, god of the forest. (Web site)
  2. Hine was sleeping soundly.

Hine-Kau-Ataata

  1. She then seduced Tiki from a pond, and gave birth to Hine-Kau-Ataata.
  2. Hine-Kau-Ataata She is a daughter of Marikoriko, the first woman, and Tiki, the first man. (Web site)

Hiro

  1. HIRO is a shy Japanese entomologist who spends his time and money collecting rare insects.
  2. Hiro is one of my favorite places to go right now. (Web site)
  3. Hiro was a semi-finalist in the 2005 Montreux Jazz Festival Solo Piano Competition and has been selected among this year's semi-finalists as well.
  4. Hiro was very excited because one of school teachers, Christa McAuliff, had been selected as a mission specialist. (Web site)

Ila

  1. Ila is a city in Nigeria.
  2. Ila is a totally organic skincare range, made from 100% chemical free ingredients.
  3. The Ila are an ethnic group in Zambia.

Ilaheva

  1. Ilaheva later told her son how to find his father.
  2. In Polynesian mythology (specifically: Tonga), Ilaheva is a worm -descendant and the mother of Ahoeitu by Eitumatupua.
  3. In Polynesian mythology (specifically: Tonga), Eitumatupua is a sky god who once climbed down to Earth on a tree and fathered Ahoeitu by Ilaheva.

Iva

  1. Iva is a genus of plants.
  2. The IVA is the organization representing the Israeli venture capital community.
  3. An IVA is a great alternative to bankruptcy for the right kind of person.

Kahomovailahi

  1. In Polynesian mythology (specifically: Samoa), Kahomovailahi is a blind, ancient navigator. (Web site)
  2. A descendant of the blind seer was known as Kahomovailahi A legendary Samoan navigator. (Web site)

Kai-N-Tiku-Aba

  1. Kai-n-tiku-aba - The sacred tree of Samoa.

Kai Tangata

  1. Before she returned to heaven as a cloud, she taught Kai Tangata how to fish.
  2. We drove a very short distance from our hotel to the Ana Kai Tangata cave.
  3. In Polynesian mythology, Kai Tangata is a mortal who married the goddess Waitiri, who later left him because he offended her.

Kanae

  1. Kanae is a senior at Ohtori Academy.
  2. Kanae is a university student whose "cold beauty" has led people to spread nasty rumors about his promiscuity.

Kane Milohai

  1. Her mother was Tahinariki, Haumea or Papa, and her father was, respectively, unknown, Kane Milohai or Rangi.
  2. In Hawaiian mythology, Pele is a goddess of fire, lightning, dance, volcanoes and violence, a daughter of Haumea and Kane Milohai. (Web site)
  3. In Polynesian mythology, Kane Milohai is the father of Kā-moho-ali'i, Pele (whom he exiled to Hawaii), Pere, Kapo, Namaka and Hi'iaka by Haumea. (Web site)

Kapo

  1. Kapo is born from Papa's eyes, Kamohoali‘i from her head as a mist-crowned precipice. (Web site)
  2. Kapo was born from the eyes of Haumea, or Papa.

Kapua

  1. Kapua is a privately held limited liability company organized under the laws of the State of Delaware.
  2. The kapua were often raised by grandparents who used magic to help them in their adventures. (Web site)

Kapuku

  1. In Polynesian mythology, Kapuku is the magic of reincarnation (see necromancy).
  2. Kapuku wants to know if this impaired ability to regulate sodium also increases the risk for the early changes in the heart's ability to fill. (Web site)
  3. By lowering blood pressure," says Dr. Kapuku. (Web site)

Karihi

  1. Karihi is a son of Urotonga and Hema .
  2. Karihi was killed and Ta-whaki buried him, but took his eyes and carried them with him. (Web site)

Knockhill

  1. Knockhill is a great circuit and I love BTCC racing where the competition is high," said Tarquini. (Web site)
  2. Knockhill is a great little circuit, and hopefully I can score some valuable extra points for the Honda team," he added. (Web site)

Kon-Tiki

  1. Kon-Tiki is also the name of the popular book which Heyerdahl wrote about his adventures.
  2. Kon-Tiki was high priest & sun-king one legendary "white men" world health organization got left tremendous ruins on the shores of Lake Titicaca. (Web site)
  3. Kon-Tiki was high priest and sun-king of these legendary "white men" who had left enormous ruins on the shores of Lake Titicaca .
  4. Kon-Tiki was high priest and sun-king of these legendary "white men" who left enormous ruins on the shores of Lake Titicaca. (Web site)

Kumu-Honua

  1. He created the sky, earth and upper heaven and gave Kumu-Honua the garden.
  2. She was married to Kumu-Honua; the couple was given a garden by Kane and were forbidden from eating a particular fruit.
  3. She was married to Kumu-Honua; the couple was given a garden by K--ne and were forbidden from eating a particular fruit. (Web site)

Kumulipo

  1. Kumulipo - the Hawaiian chant of creation.
  2. Kumulipo is a Hawaiian word, meaning "teacher of the night".
  3. The KUMULIPO is a mele ko---ihonua [genealogical chant].
  4. The Kumulipo is a Hawaiian mythical creation chant that is over 2,000 lines long.
  5. The Kumulipo is a very long Hawaiian chant consisting of over two thousand lines.

Kupe

  1. Kupe is a Polynesian explorer accredited with the historical discovery and naming of Aotearoa, when he sailed from Hawaiki about a thousand years ago.
  2. Kupe was involved in the formation of New Zealand (from M--ui's fish).

Lalo-Honua

  1. He was married to Lalo-Honua; the couple was given a garden by Kane and were forbidden from eating a particular fruit.
  2. Category: Polynesian mythology (unverified), Hawaiian mythology, Oceania mythology stubs The article "Lalo-Honua" is part of the Wikipedia encyclopedia.

Limu

  1. Limu is also the Hawaiian word for algae.
  2. Limu is the Polynesian god of the dead. (Web site)

Lua-O-Milu

  1. Dead souls enter Lua-o-Milu through a trail called Mahiki. (Web site)
  2. He is served by lizards who eat the flies of Lua-o-Milu.
  3. MILU | English | Dictionary & Translation by Babylon The abode of the dead is called Lua-o-Milu.

Maero

  1. The Maero were arboreal, hiding in the forests since the Maori arrived from Hawaii and ruined the tapu (holiness) of their homes. (Web site)
  2. The Maero were arboreal, hiding in the forests since the M--ori arrived from Hawaiki and ruined the tapu (sacredness) of their homes. (Web site)

Mahiki

  1. Mahiki is a new tiki bar and restaurant, opening in November 2006 in London's Mayfair district.

Mahiuki

  1. Did you mean: mahiki Search Results Mahiuki In Polynesian mythology, Mahiuki is a ruler of the underworld.
  2. Mahiuki - definition of Mahiuki - Labor Law Talk Dictionary In Polynesian mythology, Mahiuki is a ruler of the underworld.This article is a stub. (Web site)

Makutu

  1. Makutu is a custom that dates back to Polynesian ancestors of the Maoris.

Males

  1. Males are very rare, at least in North American species, and have a somewhat different venation than do the females. (Web site)
  2. The males are expert flut players and use their musical skills to arouse human women who happen to walk nearby.

Mana

  1. MANA is a Sanctuary nestled in the bush covered hills of the Coromandel Ranges.
  2. Mana is a Japanese musician and fashion designer, famed for his role as a leader and guitarist of the influential visual kei band Malice Mizer.
  3. Mana is a Polynesian word describing a certain concept. (Web site)
  4. Mana is a concept in Polynesian mythology, borrowed into anthropology as well as works of fantasy. (Web site)
  5. Mana is a traditional term and a concept among the speakers of Oceanic languages, including Melanesians, Polynesians and Micronesians. (Web site)

Manawa

  1. Manawa is a city located in Waupaca County, Wisconsin.
  2. Manawa is a sequel to Kiwa-Paci?fic Connections, which the Spirit Wrestler Gallery organized in the fall of 2003.
  3. Manawa is one of the M--ori words for 'heart'.
  4. Manawa is the name of the Grey Mangrove tree Avicennia marina in the M--ori language of New Zealand.
  5. Manawa was only very sparsely settled before 1860. (Web site)

Mana Pools

  1. Mana Pools is a beautiful National Park, which has been designated a World Heritage site.
  2. Mana Pools is a truly remote park.
  3. Mana Pools is a wildlife conservation area in Western Zimbabwe constituting a National Park. (Web site)
  4. Mana Pools is one of Zimbabwe's most popular parks, and it is easy to see why it falls into this profile.

Maohi

  1. It is a belief that contrasts starkly with the socioeconomic situation that the majority of Maohi face. (Web site)
  2. Last check: 2007-10-09) The Maohi people claim that France has broken the treaty by testing over 180 nuclear bombs (1966-92) on their islands. (Web site)
  3. Maohi " Maohi " can also refer to the indigenous people of French Polynesia .

Marikoriko

  1. He found the first woman, Marikoriko, in a pond.
  2. She created Marikoriko, the first woman, from a mirage and then asked Paoro to give her a voice.
  3. Origin: Maori (New Zealand) goddess of echoes; she gave voice to the first woman Marikoriko.

Matuku

  1. Matuku is a volcanic island in the Moala subgroup of Fiji 's Lau archipelago.
  2. Matuku is a volcanic island in the Moala subgroup of the Lau archipelago.

Matuku Tago Tago

  1. In Polynesian mythology, Wahie Roa is a son of Tawhaiki; he had his head bit off by a shark, Matuku Tago Tago. (Web site)
  2. In Polynesian mythology, Matuku Tago Tago is a shark who bit off the head of Wahie Roa.

Menehune

  1. Menehune is a Hawaiian term.
  2. Menehune are afraid of owls. (Web site)
  3. Menehune are the 'little people' of Hawaii, similar to pixies or trolls. (Web site)
  4. Menehune is a beautiful condo complex with oceanfront grounds to explore.
  5. The Menehune is a 30-minute air tour departing from the Lihue Airport which follows one of two routes: the North Shore or the South Shore.

Milu

  1. Milu is also the native name of a Chinese deer.
  2. Milu is the name of a Chinese deer.
  3. Milu was a traditional chief of Waipio valley. (Web site)
  4. Milu was the chief god of the Under-world throughout the greater part of Polynesia. (Web site)

Mother

  1. The Mother is the life-giver, the source of nurturing and nourishment, unconditional fountain of love, patience, devotion, caring, and unselfish acts. (Web site)
  2. The mother was given to Puna who used her as a food-stand for his wife.
  3. The mother was made a slave for the Puna house.

Nana-Ula

  1. In Polynesian mythology ( Hawaii), Nana-Ula is the hero who led his people from Tahiti to Hawaii. (Web site)
  2. After his people had settled on the islands, Nana-Ula became the first king of Hawaii. (Web site)

Nga-Atua

  1. He eventually reached the sixth of twelve heavens, Nga-Atua, and was reunited with his late lover, Tangotango, and their daughter Arahuta. (Web site)
  2. In Polynesian mythology, Nga-Atua is the sixth of twelve layers of Heaven. (Web site)
  3. Finally, he reached Nga-Atua, the sixth heaven, where his former lover Tangotango lived with their daughter Arahuta. (Web site)

Nganaoa

  1. In Polynesian mythology ( Maori), Nganaoa is a hero who killed three sea-monsters and found his father, Tairi, and his mother alive inside one's stomach.
  2. In Polynesian mythology ( Maori), Tairi is the father of Nganaoa, who rescued Tairi and his wife after they were eaten by a sea monster. (Web site)
  3. His request was refused, and the canoe sailed away, but Nganaoa had secreted himself on board and was discovered soon after Rata was out of sight of land.

Ngaro

  1. Ngaro is a portable emulator and virtual machine for a MISC architecture.
  2. Ngaro is a portable virtual machine for a dual-stack architecture.
  3. The Ngaro were often called the `Island People', as their territory extended north - south along the island chain which make up the Cumberland Group. (Web site)

Ngaru

  1. Ngaru was black and entirely bald; Tongatea left him when she saw his appearance. (Web site)
  2. Ngaru was black and entirely bald; his wife, Tongatea , left him when she saw his appearance.
  3. Ngaru was black and entirely hairless. (Web site)
  4. Ngaru was fl and entirely bald; his Tongatea left him when she saw his He bleached himself at a limepit and Tangaroa fixed his hair. (Web site)
  5. Ngaru was fl and entirely bald; his wife, (Click link for more info and facts about Tongatea) Tongatea, left him when she saw his appearance. (Web site)

Nightmarchers

  1. The Nightmarchers are the ghosts of ancient Hawaiian high ranking warriors.

Note

  1. Note: The Hawaiian legends frequently unite animal and human forms and characteristics in one individual, like the centaurs of Roman mythology.
  2. Note: The language family of each language is listed in parentheses.
  3. Note: the e-mail sent will contain information, such as your IP address ( 76.10.181.25), for purposes of tracking abuse.

Pahuanui

  1. Drug Vedic class of demons Pahuanui One of the demons of the sea in Tahitian cosmology. (Web site)
  2. Did you mean: "pahinui is a" Search Results Pahuanui In Polynesian mythology ( Tahiti ), Pahuanui is a sea monster .

Paliuli

  1. Paliuli is a private, small complex of individual units.

Pania

  1. Pania is a single Mum who is now in her third year of study at Otago University pursuing a degree in social and community work.
  2. Pania is a small mare with excellent movement and very pretty markings.
  3. Pania was recovered by police on November 4 , restored, then replaced on November 16 .

Papa

  1. About 70% of all human languages contain the word "papa", making it potentially the first word ever created about 100,000 years ago. (Web site)
  2. Papa is a name commonly used for a father, and as such, is another name for the Pope of the Roman Catholic church. (Web site)
  3. Papa is a name commonly used for a father.
  4. Papa is also the letter P in the NATO phonetic alphabet. (Web site)
  5. Papa is the mother Earth, wife of the sky god, Wakea, who, as a giant bird, laid an egg which became the island Hawaii.

Pele

  1. Pele is a goddess associated with volcanoes and lava.
  2. Pele - A Polynesian Fire goddess associated with the flow of lava.
  3. Pele is a goddess of fire, lightning, dance, volcanoes and violence, a daughter of Haumea and Kane Milohai. (Web site)
  4. Pele is born to Kane-hoa-lani and Haumea in Kuaihelani. (Web site)
  5. Pele is one of a family of seven sons and six daughters born to Haumea and her husband Moemoe (Moemoe-a-aulii), all distinguished figures in old legend.

Polynesian Deities

  1. Category:Polynesian deities Subcategories There are 2 subcategories to this category.
  2. F Fijian mythology P Polynesian deities Articles in category "Polynesian mythology" There are 101 articles in this category.
  3. Apu-Hau A Hawaiian storm-god, one of the many Polynesian deities connected with storms and winds. (Web site)

Polynesian Mythology

  1. In Polynesian mythology (specifically: Samoa), Atonga is a culture hero, half-mortal and half-spirit. (Web site)
  2. In Polynesian mythology (specifically: Fiji), Cibaciba and Drakulu are the two cave entrances to the underworld (see Degei). (Web site)
  3. In Polynesian mythology (specifically: Fiji), Murimuria is the underworld. (Web site)

Ponaturi

  1. Ponaturi are sometimes described as sea fairies.
  2. The Ponaturi are killed by the fire and the exposure to the sunlight.

Poukai

  1. The Poukai is a Haast Eagle, extinct for over 500 years. (Web site)
  2. The poukai is a giant, man-eating bird of the islands, greatly feared.

Pua Tu Tahi

  1. In the mythology of Tahiti, Pua Tu Tahi was one of the demons of the deep in the legend of Rata.
  2. Pua Tu Tahi A dangerous demon living under the sea in Tahitian cosmology. (Web site)

Pukatala

  1. Please search for Pukatala in Wikipedia to check for alternative titles or spellings.
  2. In Polynesian mythology, Pukatala is a tree which gives food for the spirits of the dead in the underworld.
  3. Start the Pukatala article or add a request for it.

Rangi

  1. The Rangi is a yoga inspired slip-on from Naot's Koru collection.

Rata

  1. Rata is the child of Mafieloa and Tavini-tokelau, born when she eats an eel to satisfy a pregnancy craving. (Web site)
  2. Rata was instructed by his grandmother not to play in the game, but to sit next to her as judges.
  3. Rata was so angry that he quite forgot himself and shouted 'Pa-a-a-a!' in a great voice, causing the sprites to fall over themselves with fright.

Rehua

  1. Rehua is a son of Rangi and Papa, and the ancestor of Maui and his four brothers. (Web site)
  2. Rehua is a star, and a bright one.

Rohi

  1. Rohi is a bright and insightful being.
  2. Rohi is a major fan of Bollywood pictures.
  3. Mā te waha kōrero, mā te ringa tuhituhi, mā te taringa whakarongo me te whatu ārohi kupu e ora ai tō tātou reo. (Web site)

Rongo

  1. Rongo is a small business center in a rural, agricultural part of Western Kenya. (Web site)
  2. Rongo was also the elder brother to Tongaiti, (lizard god), to Tangiia and to Tanepapakai. (Web site)

Samoa

  1. Samoa is a fertile, fruitful, productive country.
  2. Samoa is a fertile, fruitful, productive island.
  3. Samoa is a surfing paradise and the top waves are off the north-facing coasts in summer, off the south-facing coasts in winter.
  4. Samoa is an independent country.
  5. Samoa is one of the least expensive countries in the South Pacific. (Web site)

Samoans

  1. Samoans are a deeply spiritual and religious people, and have subtly adapted the dominant religion, Christianity, to 'fit in' with fa'a Samoa and vice versa.
  2. Samoans are a typically open, friendly, welcoming, and good-humoured people with great pride in their culture, traditions, history, and nationhood.
  3. Samoans are believed to have migrated from the West, (the East Indies, the Malay Peninsula or the Philippines). (Web site)
  4. Samoans are deeply spiritual and religious people, and have subtly adapted the dominant religion of Christianity to 'fit in' with fa'a Samoa and vice versa. (Web site)
  5. Samoans are entitled to elect one non-voting delegate to the United States House of Representatives.

Savali

  1. Savali In Samoan myth, the messenger of the ocean-god and creator Tagaloa. (Web site)
  2. Newspaper obituaries containing the surname " "Savali" ". (Web site)
  3. Category: Oceania mythology stubs, Samoan mythology, Polynesian mythology (unverified) The article "Savali" is part of the Wikipedia encyclopedia.

Tahekeroa

  1. In Polynesian mythology, Tahekeroa is the land of the spirits, located deep within the center of the Earth.
  2. Results from FactBites: Tahekeroa Community Profile(published) (484 words) The area used for this profile is based on Statistics New Zealand's area unit. (Web site)

Tairi

  1. In Polynesian mythology ( Maori), Nganaoa is a hero who killed three sea-monsters and found his father, Tairi, and his mother alive inside one's stomach.
  2. In Polynesian mythology ( Maori), Tairi is the father of Nganaoa, who rescued Tairi and his wife after they were eaten by a sea monster. (Web site)

Tangaroa

  1. TANGAROA is the most important of the "departmental" gods of Polynesia.
  2. TANGAROA was the first son of Rangi and Papa, and god of the sea. (Web site)
  3. Tangaroa - The Polynesian god of fish and reptiles.
  4. Tangaroa is known as 'The Sea God' His extended name Ngapuhi remmember as Tangaroa-Wehenga-Wai-ki-Ura traslated meaning; Tangaroa who speads the red Sea. (Web site)
  5. Tangaroa is the father of all the sea creatures, including mermaids, from whence came humanity.

Tangotango

  1. Tangotango - A fairy of the heavenly race in Maori myth.

Taniwha

  1. Taniwha are generally (but not always) hostile to men.
  2. Taniwha is a dragon from Maori legends, who is said to have lived in a cave.
  3. The taniwha is a guardian spirit, both in the physical as well as the metaphysical sense.
  4. The taniwha is a horrible beast.
  5. The taniwha is a mythical Maori creature that lives in water and is often seen as a guardian of its dwelling.

Tapairu

  1. Tapairu is a woman of great mana.
  2. The Tapairu are her daughters.

Taringa Nui

  1. Ka aroha atu ki a Tiakiwai, nona nei nga taringa nui rawa e whakaruru ana i a ia.
  2. In Polynesian mythology, the Taringa Nui ("big ears ") were wooden statues which sailors took on voyages. (Web site)
  3. Heoi ano, me tupato nga tamariki o Tane, kei patura e tenei tangata kua hoha I ona taringa nui.

Tawhiri

  1. Tawhiri is the Polynesian god of storms and winds. (Web site)
  2. Tawhiri was furious that his siblings did this to his parents. (Web site)
  3. Tawhiri was so upset with his brother, Tane, for having separated their parents that he caused storms and hurricanes. (Web site)
  4. Tawhiri was the god of the winds according to Maori mythology. (Web site)

Te Toi-O-Nga-Rangi

  1. In Polynesian mythology, Te Toi-o-nga-Rangi is the highest of the twelve heavens and the abode of Kiho.
  2. Please search for Te Toi-o-nga-Rangi in Wikipedia to check for alternative titles or spellings. (Web site)

Tevake

  1. In Polynesian mythology, the Tevake are spirits symbolized by the gannet.
  2. Start the Tevake article or add a request for it.
  3. Continue to Tevake to reach Mackay in the early morning. (Web site)

Thewordbook

  1. Thewordbook is a comprehensive encyclopedia and a reference search engine, in which you have found this entry about Avaiki.
  2. Thewordbook is a comprehensive encyclopedia and a reference search engine, in which you have found this entry about Haumia-tiketike.
  3. Thewordbook is a comprehensive encyclopedia and a reference search engine, in which you have found this entry about Havaii.
  4. Thewordbook is a comprehensive encyclopedia and a reference search engine, in which you have found this entry about Varima-te-takere.
  5. Thewordbook is a comprehensive encyclopedia and a reference search engine, in which you have found this entry about Vatea.

Tiki

  1. A Tiki is a carving shaped to resemble a god or spirit.
  2. A tiki is a male figure in Polynesian mythology, sometimes identified as the first man.
  3. The Tiki is your best beachfront value with affordable daily,weekly and monthly rates.
  4. The term "Tiki" comes from the islands of Polynesia in the South Pacific, and has multiple meanings.
  5. The word "tiki" may also refer to a type of cocktail based on or similar to tiki culture.

Tikis

  1. Tikis are known throughout the South Pacific and Hawaiian islands mainly, but all seem to share the same purpose. (Web site)
  2. Tikis are said to house spirits; each Tiki contains in it it's very own spirit. (Web site)

Tipua

  1. Tipua are goblins.

Tonga

  1. Tonga is the only monarchy in the Pacific, and the constitutionally mandated power of the Tongan monarchs is greater than that of the English monarchs.
  2. Tonga is to the south. (Web site)
  3. Tonga was united into a Polynesian kingdom in 1845 by the ambitious young warrior, strategist, and orator Taufa'ahau.

Tonga-Hiti

  1. The two survivors were Kanae, who became a flying fish, and Tonga-Hiti, who became a demon that causes headaches. (Web site)
  2. The survivors were (Click link for more info and facts about Tonga-Hiti) Tonga-Hiti and (Click link for more info and facts about Kanae) Kanae. (Web site)
  3. Tonga-Hiti A Polynesian head-ache demon, one of the two Ponaturi that managed to escape Urutonga's revenge for the death of her husband.

Tongatea

  1. Ngaru was black and entirely bald; his wife, Tongatea, left him when she saw his appearance.
  2. Ngaru was fl and entirely bald; his wife, Tongatea, left him when she saw his appearance. (Web site)
  3. Ngaru was fl and entirely bald; his Tongatea left him when she saw his He bleached himself at a limepit and Tangaroa fixed his hair. (Web site)

Tukoio

  1. This mohoao at once attacked Tukoio and fought fiercely with him until Tukoio had cut off his arms and legs. (Web site)
  2. A man named Tukoio once came across a particularly hairy mohoao -- hair so long it trailed upon the ground -- who was spearing birds with his fingernails.
  3. Tukoio, a mortal man, once found a maero and attacked it, cutting of its arms, legs and head. (Web site)

Tumuitearetoka

  1. In Polynesian mythology, Tumuitearetoka is the king of the sharks, who could not catch Ngaru.
  2. Ngaru determined to try his strength against Tikokura and his shark-like companion, Tumuitearetoka.
  3. Tumuitearetoka could not catch Ngaru, and declared that all people who used this device would be hunted his his minions, the sharks. (Web site)

Tuna

  1. The Tuna are several species of ocean-dwelling fish in the family Scombridae. (Web site)
  2. Tuna are fast swimmers and include several species that are warm-blooded.
  3. Tuna are several species of ocean-dwelling fish in the family Scombridae. (Web site)
  4. Tuna is a popular seafood, and in danger from overfishing. (Web site)

Turehu

  1. The Turehu were there putting out the net in which the fish were caught. (Web site)
  2. Turehu - A race of fair-haired fairies.

Uekera

  1. Te Uekera is a government-owned paper managed and owned by a board that is overseen by a government minister.
  2. U Size Title Content 84 Uekera In [[Polynesian mythology]], '''Uekera''' is a [[tree]] that reaches to the heavens.
  3. Did you mean: "uecker is a" Search Results Uekera In Polynesian mythology , Uekera is a tree that reaches to the heavens.

Upolu

  1. Upolu is a fertile island with beautiful scenery and excellent swimming opportunities (check out Lefaga Bay but be aware of the reefs).
  2. Upolu is an island in Samoa, formed by a massive basalt ic shield volcano which rises from the seafloor of the western Pacific Ocean.
  3. Upolu is an island in Samoa, formed by a massive basaltic shield volcano which rises from the seafloor of the western Pacific Ocean. (Web site)
  4. Upolu is the more developed and populous of the two islands of Samoa available to tourists. (Web site)
  5. Upolu is the more developed and populous, containing the capital, Apia; Savaii is a much broader island. (Web site)

Urotonga

  1. Hema was killed by the Ponaturi, and Karihi and his mother, Urotonga, and his younger brother, Tawhaki, killed them all but two in revenge.
  2. Hema was killed by the Ponaturi, and Tawhaki and his mother, Urotonga, and his older brother, Karihi, killed them all but two in revenge. (Web site)
  3. Hema was killed by the Ponaturi, and Urotonga and her sons, Tawhaki and Karihi, killed them all but two in revenge.

Vatea

  1. VATEA is a major source of funds for equipment for academic support of the College's career programs and for noncredit adult vocational programming. (Web site)
  2. Vatea are also a group of tattoo artists who promote the techniques and symbols of the traditional Polynesian tribal tattoo and the Marquesan style.
  3. Vatea was a descendant of "the long ago," according to the Hervey legend. (Web site)

Vitu

  1. Vitu is a 25 years old Male from Warsaw, Poland.
  2. Vitu is a devoted family man.

Wahie Roa

  1. In Polynesian mythology, Matuku Tago Tago is a shark who bit off the head of Wahie Roa.
  2. Last check: 2007-10-22) In Polynesian mythology Wahie Roa is a son of Tawhaiki ; he had his head bit off a shark Matuku Tago Tago. (Web site)

Related Keywords

    * Mareikura * Whaitiri * Whatu * Wikipedia
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  Short phrases about "Glossary of Polynesian Mythology"
  Originally created: March 25, 2008.
  Links checked: April 13, 2013.
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