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Glossary of Unix       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Glossaries > Glossary of Unix /   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
UNIX
LINUX
PROJECT MONTEREY
SOLARIS
SUNOS
THE OPEN GROUP
UNIX SYSTEM III
UNIX SYSTEM V
HELIOS
RUNLEVEL
SIGNALS
UNICOS
USENIX
UNIX-LIKE
UNIXWARE
UNIX SOFTWARE
XENIX
FILESYSTEM HIERARCHY STANDARD
HP-UX
INODE
IRIX
MINIX
OPERATING SYSTEMS
POSIX
PIPES
PROCESSES
RESEARCH UNIX
RETURN VALUE
SHADOW PASSWORD
SIGHUP
STANDARD STREAMS
SYSTEM V INTERFACE DEFINITION
UNIX FILE TYPES
UNIX SYSTEM SERVICES
UNIX BILLENNIUM
UNIX TIME
UNIX PHILOSOPHY
AIX OPERATING SYSTEM
ART OF UNIX PROGRAMMING
BELL LABS
BERKELEY SOFTWARE DISTRIBUTION
BINARY FILE DESCRIPTOR
BSD
CALDERA
COMPUTER SYSTEMS RESEARCH GROUP
COMPUTERS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Glossary of Unix"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Unix

  1. But that doesn't mean that you can use the name "unix" on your marketing materials just like that. (Web site)
  2. He coined the term "Unix" as a word-play on the much larger "Multics" project. (Web site)
  3. Linguistic -- The name "Unix" was intended as a pun on the name Multics and was written "Unics" at first, for UNiplexed Information and Computing System. (Web site)
  4. The name "UNIX" is a trademark of The Open Group which licenses it for use with any operating system that has been shown to conform to their definitions. (Web site)
  5. The name "Unix" was intended as a pun on Multics (and was written "Unics" at first -- UNiplexed Information and Computing System).

Linux

  1. LINUX is a version of UNIX that has gained popularity because of its stability as an operating system for hosting web servers.
  2. LINUX is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.
  3. Linux - a high performance, yet completely free, Unix-like operating system launched by Linus Torvalds in 1991.
  4. Linux is a UNIX-like kernel, which is written by Linus Torvalds and other developers. (Web site)
  5. LINUX is a monolithic style system.

Project Monterey

  1. Project Monterey is a major UNIX operating system initiative formed by leading hardware and software partners IBM, SCO and Intel. (Web site)
  2. Project Monterey is a joint venture among SCO, IBM, Sequent, and Compaq to deliver a high-volume, enterprise-class Unix operating system.
  3. Project Monterey is a high-volume, enterprise-class, commercial UNIX operating system initiative launched last October.
  4. Project Monterey is a major UNIX operating system initiative which includes such major industry participants as IBM, SCO and Intel. (Web site)
  5. Project Monterey was actually started before Linux did. (Web site)

Solaris

  1. Solaris is a commercial version of UNIX developed by Sun Microsystems, Inc. (Web site)
  2. Solaris is a computer operating system, the proprietary Unix variant developed by Sun Microsystems.
  3. Solaris is a bit more scalable because it supports more architectures. (Web site)
  4. Solaris is a registered trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc. (Web site)
  5. Solaris is a registered trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc., which has not tested or approved this product. (Web site)

Sunos

  1. SunOS is a Sun Microsystems implementation of the Unix operating system .
  2. SunOS is similar to BSD Unix with some SVR4 features and OpenWindows 3.0. (Web site)
  3. SunOS is a real-time security monitoring application for.
  4. SunOS is a trademark of Sun Microsystems. (Web site)

The Open Group

  1. The Open Group is a not-for-profit company with over 15 years experience of developing standards and interoperable products. (Web site)
  2. The Open Group is a specialist in the development and operation of certification programs for software specifications endorsed by industry standards bodies. (Web site)
  3. The Open Group is a standards consortium, who own both TOGAF & UNIX brands.
  4. The Open Group is a vendor-neutral and technology-neutral consortium. (Web site)
  5. The Open Group is a vendor-neutral organization. (Web site)

Unix System Iii

  1. Sus sistemas operativos m--s significativos son UNIX System III y UNIX System V. BSD: familia originada por el licenciamiento de UNIX a Berkely. (Web site)
  2. An independent implementation of virtual memory was done at AT&T 's UNIX Support Group for the UNIX System III release in 1982.
  3. Unics became Unix; was recast in tighter, more portable C code; and was brought to market by AT&T as the Unix System III. (Web site)

Unix System V

  1. In 2005, Sun Microsystems released the bulk of its Solaris system code (based on UNIX System V Release 4) into an open source project called OpenSolaris.
  2. To end the confusion between all its differing internal versions, AT&T combined them into UNIX System V Release 1.
  3. AT&T then combined various versions developed at other universities and companies into UNIX System V Release 1, which was released in 1983. (Web site)

Helios

  1. HeliOS was a Unix -like operating system for parallel computers developed and sold by Perihelion Software. (Web site)
  2. Helios was predominantly an operating system for Transputer systems. (Web site)
  3. Helios was designed for a network of multiple nodes, connected by multiple high-bandwidth communications links. (Web site)
  4. HELIOS is a developer of cross-platform networking, PDF, and image server solutions for Mac, Windows, UNIX, and web clients. (Web site)
  5. Helios is a CCD-based pump-probe transient absorption spectrometer.

Runlevel

  1. A runlevel is a software configuration of the system that allows only a selected group of processes to exist. (Web site)
  2. A runlevel is a preset operating state on a Unix -like operating system.
  3. A runlevel is a defined set of system services that are run together. (Web site)
  4. A runlevel is a group of activities, bound together by a numbered runlevel.
  5. A runlevel is a software configuration of the system which allows only a selected group of processes to exist.

Signals

  1. Signals are a mechanism whereby the kernel can inform client code of certain events.
  2. Signals are blocked for the duration of a signal handler ( i.e. (Web site)
  3. Signals are dispatched to children before their parents. (Web site)
  4. Signals are given either by number or name.
  5. Signals are integral to any Unix® or Linux® application and are part of the POSIX®.1 standard. (Web site)

Unicos

  1. Unicos is the primary operating system found on Cray super computers.
  2. UNICOS is a UNIX like opera ting system developed by Cray Research for its supercomputer s.
  3. UNICOS is the first 64 bit implementation of UNIX and a UNIX similar file system.
  4. UNICOS was originally introduced in 1985 with the Cray-2 system and later with other Cray models.
  5. Unicos is a slightly more difficult system to patch. (Web site)

Usenix

  1. USENIX was started in 1975 as 'The Unix Users Group' and has been holding regular conferences ever since (along with many other activities, of course). (Web site)
  2. USENIX is a blend of academic presentations and socialization. (Web site)
  3. USENIX is a place to present groundbreaking research and cutting-edge practices in a wide variety of technologies and environments.

Unix-Like

  1. Linux is a UNIX-like kernel, which is written by Linus Torvalds and other developers. (Web site)
  2. They do not approve of the construction "Unix-like", and consider it misuse of their trademark.
  3. This is the talk page for discussing improvements to the Template:Unix-like page.

Unixware

  1. UnixWare is a Unix operating system maintained by The SCO Group (SCO).[1][2][3] Unixware is typically deployed as a server rather than desktop. (Web site)
  2. UnixWare is a registered trademark of Novell, Inc.
  3. UnixWare is the trade name for Unix System V, which can trace its lineage back to Unix's creation at AT&T Bell Labs.
  4. UnixWare was the result of Novell 's efforts to make Unix interoperable with Novell NetWare.

Unix Software

  1. The better you understand IPC, the better your UNIX software will run.
  2. Leopard Server is source-level compatibility with any Unix software in the wild, or at least that which adheres to Unix standards. (Web site)
  3. For more information, please visit the OSSP, the world of Unix Software Technologies.

Xenix

  1. Xenix was Microsoft's version of Unix intended for use on microprocessors, but they called it Xenix because it could not license the " UNIX " name. (Web site)
  2. Xenix was sold by Microsoft for a short period, but they didnt write it.
  3. XENIX was an enhanced version id the UNIX operating system. (Web site)
  4. Xenix was another derivative of Unix, which was developed way before.

Filesystem Hierarchy Standard

  1. Filesystem Hierarchy Standard is a set of requirements and guidelines for file and directory placement under UNIX-like operating systems.
  2. The Filesystem Hierarchy Standard is a document that specifies the layout of directories on a Linux system.
  3. The Filesystem Hierarchy Standard is also an important tool that significantly eases interdistribution cooperation.
  4. The Filesystem Hierarchy Standard was created to provide a reference directory layout for Unix-like operating systems, particularly Linux.

Hp-Ux

  1. HP-UX - a proprietary flavor of UNIX developed by Hewlett-Packard for its HP 9000 series of business servers.
  2. HP-UX is a UNIX -based † operating system made by Hewlett-Packard that runs on HP PA RISC. (Web site)
  3. HP-UX is a commercial version of Unix designed for high end business applications.
  4. HP-UX is a proven operating system that offers the enterprise market world-leading functionality. (Web site)
  5. HP-UX is a registered trademark of the Hewlett-Packard Company. (Web site)

Inode

  1. An inode is a data structure in UNIX operating systems that contains important information pertaining to files within a file system. (Web site)
  2. An inode is a data structure in Unix file systems, which holds key information about a file. (Web site)
  3. An "inode" is a data structure that describes a file.
  4. An Inode is a structure representing each file under Linux.
  5. An inode is a data structure in Unix file systems, which holds key information about a file. (Web site)

Irix

  1. IRIX is a computer operating system developed by Silicon Graphics, Inc. (Web site)
  2. IRIX is a registered trademark a trademark of Silicon Graphics, Inc. (Web site)
  3. IRIX is a registered trademark and SGI is a trademark of Silicon Graphics, Inc.
  4. IRIX is a registered trademark of Silicon Graphics, Inc. (Web site)
  5. IRIX was a leader in Symmetric Multi-Processing (SMP), scalable from 1 to greater than 1024 processors with a single system image. (Web site)

Minix

  1. MINIX - a small, open source UNIX clone that was first released in January 1987.
  2. MINIX is a Unix clone, which contains no AT&T code.
  3. MINIX is a Unix-like computer operating system based on a microkernel architecture. (Web site)
  4. MINIX is a free UNIX clone that is available with all the source code. (Web site)
  5. MINIX is a free Unix clone written from scratch and does not contain any AT&T code and for this reason the source code is also available. (Web site)

Operating Systems

  1. Operating Systems are resource managers. (Web site)
  2. Operating systems were not in the Bell Labs plan — AT&T had joined the Multics consortium precisely to avoid doing an operating system on its own. (Web site)

Posix

  1. POSIX is a family of standards that were developed to describe a UNIX like user interface. (Web site)
  2. POSIX is a registered trademark and 1003.1 is a trademark of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, Inc.
  3. POSIX is a registered trademark of IEEE.
  4. POSIX is a registered trademark of the IEEE Inc. (Web site)
  5. POSIX is a registered trademark of the IEEE. (Web site)

Pipes

  1. Pipes are another form of descriptor that have been used in UNIX for some time. (Web site)
  2. Pipes are FIFO-type communication channels allowing programs to communicate through simple file descriptors. (Web site)
  3. Pipes are also handy in looking for files (more on this in further parts of the guide).
  4. Pipes are an efficient way to apply multiple commandes concurrently. (Web site)
  5. Pipes are extensively used in search operations applied to system logs.

Processes

  1. Processes are cheap.
  2. Processes are deleted automatically after they terminate, but not necessarily right away. (Web site)
  3. Processes are displayed in order of CPU utilization. (Web site)
  4. Processes are each given a guaranteed time slice, a period when each is allowed to execute without being preempted.
  5. Processes are shown in a ps-like style. (Web site)

Research Unix

  1. Version 7 Unix, the last version of Research Unix to be released widely, was released in 1979.
  2. So, the first Research Unix would be the First Edition, and the last the Tenth Edition.
  3. Research Unix versions are often called by the edition of the manual that describes them.

Return Value

  1. The return value is a count of bytes ( not buffers) read, @math{0} indicating end-of-file, or @math{-1} indicating an error. (Web site)
  2. The return value is a count of bytes written, or @math{-1} indicating an error. (Web site)
  3. The return value is a pointer to the value stored in the DString. (Web site)
  4. The return value is based at 0 (or whatever you've set the $[ variable to--but don't do that). (Web site)
  5. The return value is the exit status of the program as returned by the wait() call. (Web site)

Shadow Password

  1. Power MachTen uses shadow password that it keeps in a separate encrypted file. (Web site)
  2. This shadow password structure contains pointers to strings, and these strings are stored in the buffer buf of size buflen.
  3. The getspent() function returns a pointer to the next entry in the shadow password database.

Sighup

  1. SIGHUP is a signal used on POSIX -compliant platforms, originally designed to notify processes of a serial line drop. (Web site)
  2. SIGHUP is a signal that means, by convention, "the terminal line got hung up". (Web site)
  3. SIGHUP is a symbolic constant defined in signal.h. (Web site)
  4. SIGHUP is a symbolic constant defined in the header file signal.h.
  5. SIGHUP is a symbolic signal name used on POSIX compliant platforms, originally designed to notify processes of a serial line drop.

Standard Streams

  1. The standard streams are a set of input and output channels featured in Unix and Unix-like operating systems.
  2. The standard streams are closed by a call to exit(3) and by nor- mal program termination.
  3. The standard streams are closed by a call to exit(3) and by normal program termination. (Web site)

System V Interface Definition

  1. The SVr2 was formally described in the System V Interface Definition version 1 ( SVID 1) published in 1985. (Web site)
  2. The system also forms the basis of the System V Interface Definition (SVID), a standard defining how System V systems should work.
  3. This release was formally described in the System V Interface Definition version 2 ( SVID 2).

Unix File Types

  1. The Ext2fs supports standard Unix file types: regular files, directories, device special files and symbolic links.
  2. TED Notepad - Light-weight plain-text editor with many hotkeys, clipboards and inovative features; using UNICODE, UTF-8 and UNIX file types.

Unix System Services

  1. The book starts with a quick, easy overview of both the Win32 API and UNIX system services in Solaris and Red Hat Linux.
  2. Programming the Win32 API and UNIX System Services is the first hands-on, practical guide to systems programming in both environments.
  3. Programming the Win32 API and UNIX System Services is must reading for all serious professional enterprise programmers.

Unix Billennium

  1. The Unix Billennium is the point in time represented by a 2001 .
  2. The Unix Billennium is the point in time represented by a desktop environment.

Unix Time

  1. UNIX time is the method by which several key software systems-among them the UNIX OS and the Java programming language-measure time.

Unix Philosophy

  1. The UNIX Philosophy is a book to be read before tackling the highly technical texts on UNIX internals and programming.

Aix Operating System

  1. The AIX operating system is a UNIX-type operating system.
  2. The AIX operating system is a Unix type operating system and employs many of its features including system calls and file organization. (Web site)

Art of Unix Programming

  1. The Art of Unix Programming is a great book for a new user who wants to learn more about Unix.

Bell Labs

  1. Bell Labs was the early developer of Unix as an operating system to serve the internal needs of its staff. (Web site)
  2. Bell labs were using UNIX extensively without any central support, nor could the parent company ATT provide support, because of American law.
  3. Bell labs were using UNIX extensively withoutany central support, nor could the parent company ATT provide support, because of Americanlaw. (Web site)

Berkeley Software Distribution

  1. Berkeley Software Distribution is a derivative of the Unix operating system that was created by and is distributed by the University of California, Berkeley. (Web site)
  2. Berkeley Software Distribution is the UNIX derivative distributed by the University of California, Berkeley starting in the 1970s.

Binary File Descriptor

  1. The BFD, or Binary File Descriptor library, is the GNU Project 's main mechanism for the portable manipulation of object files in a variety of formats.
  2. The current versions were originally written by programmers at Cygnus Solutions using the Binary File Descriptor library (libbfd).
  3. Search Results The steps on how to use Linux objcopy, ldd and od utilities BFD --- Binary File Descriptor.

Bsd

  1. BSD is one of several branches of Unix operating systems. (Web site)
  2. BSD is a software license.
  3. BSD is a registered trademark of UUnet Technologies, Inc.

Caldera

  1. Caldera was a Linux vendor, although it wasn't very good at it and was losing market share to other vendors like Red Hat and SuSE. (Web site)
  2. Caldera is a registered trademark of Caldera Systems, Inc.
  3. Caldera was intended to be a Linux distributor, aiming at the business and enterprise market. (Web site)
  4. Caldera was one such Linux vendor until quite recently, when they chose to go down a proprietary cul-de-sac and revisit ancient mistakes. (Web site)

Computer Systems Research Group

  1. All BSD varieties have their roots in the version of Unix developed by the Computer Systems Research Group at the University of California at Berkeley. (Web site)
  2. Fabry then set up an organization called the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG), with Joy as project leader, to work on what would become BSD Unix. (Web site)

Computers

  1. Computers are based on the binary numbering system, which consists of just two unique numbers, 0 and 1.
  2. Computers were so expensive at the time that they had to be shared to be economical. (Web site)

Related Keywords

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  Originally created: July 17, 2008.
  Links checked: June 19, 2013.
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