KeyWEn.com  
 
 
 
Granite       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Matter > Materials > Rocks > Igneous Rocks > Granite   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
GEOLOGISTS
CONTINENTS
ANDESITE
JPG HAND SAMPLE
SIMILAR COMPOSITION
SIMILAR
BUILDING MATERIAL
EMPLACEMENT
TEMPLE
MELTED ROCK
PLAGIOCLASE FELDSPAR
BIOTITE MICA
EROSION
ARKOSE
ORIGIN
COMMON IGNEOUS ROCKS
SMALL CRYSTALS
QUARRIES
HARDNESS
CRYSTALLINE ROCKS
PORPHYRY
SANDSTONE
COUNTERTOPS
ASSOCIATED
PLUTONS
INTRUSIVE ROCK
FELSPAR
FINE-GRAINED
EXTRUSIVE IGNEOUS ROCK
DIMENSION STONE
TONALITE
QUARTZ DIORITE
FELSIC IGNEOUS ROCKS
COARSE GRAINED
INTRUSIVE
DIABASE
DYKES
EARTH
COARSE-GRAINED IGNEOUS ROCK
GRANITES
QUARTZITE
COMMON CONSTITUENT
SLOW COOLING
LARGE CRYSTALS
METAMORPHIC ROCK
METAMORPHIC ROCKS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Granite"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Granite is a compound of feldspar, quartz, and mica, the feldspars being rich in silica, which forms from 60 to 70 per cent of the whole aggregate.
  2. Granite is a common and widely-occurring group of intrusive felsic igneous rocks that form at great depths and pressures under continents.
  3. Granite is a crystalline, igneous rock, composed mainly of quartz, orthoclase and microcline.
  4. Granite is a coarse-grained igneous rock of even texture and light color, composed chiefly of quartz and feldspars.
  5. Granite is a coarse-grained, light colored, intrusive igneous rock that contains mainly quartz and feldspar minerals.

Geologists

  1. Geologists classify granite as an igneous rock.

Continents

  1. Granite is a common and widely-occurring group of intrusive felsic igneous rocks that forms at great depths and pressures under continents.
  2. It released the continents from the Earth's core and transformed them into icebergs of gneiss [granite] on a sea of basalt.

Andesite

  1. Amphibole is only abundant in diorite or andesite, although minor amounts can be present in granite.
  2. The continental crust consists of lower density material such as the igneous rock s granite and andesite.
  3. Continental crust is made of lower density rocks, such as andesite and granite.

Jpg Hand Sample

  1. Granite.jpg Hand sample of the intrusive igneous rock granite, one of the most common rocks of the upper continental crust.

Similar Composition

  1. It is of similar composition than granite, and if a gneiss is heated just a little bit further, a granitic melt will rise from it.

Similar

  1. The rhyolite porphyry and the granite are similar in composition, and so are the syenite and andesite porphyries.
  2. Its composition is very similar to that of granite and rhyolite.
  3. The chemical composition of granite is similar to that of lava.

Building Material

  1. Granite has been used since ancient times as a building material.

Emplacement

  1. The ascent and emplacement of large volumes of granite within the upper continental crust is a source of much debate amongst geologists.
  2. Greisens are formed by endoskarn alteration of granite during the cooling stages of emplacement.

Temple

  1. This temple is fairly well preserved, even though the walls were not encased with granite or marble.
  2. This temple is the first known temple to make use of limestone, granite and basalt.
  3. Ahmose II in the twenty-sixth dynasty rebuilt the temple again, and placed in it a large monolith shrine of red granite, finely wrought.

Melted Rock

  1. Granite is an igneous rock, because it formed as melted rock cooled and hardened.

Plagioclase Feldspar

  1. Granite contains three main minerals - quartz, alkali feldspar, and plagioclase feldspar.
  2. An increasing proportion of plagioclase feldspar causes granite to pass into granodiorite.

Biotite Mica

  1. Granite also contains small amounts of dark brown, dark-green, or black minerals, such as hornblende and biotite mica.

Erosion

  1. Although resistant, granite is not immune from the effects of weathering and erosion.
  2. Since then, erosion has left stumps of granite that form the magnificent peaks around Rio de Janeiro.

Arkose

  1. Arkose is a form of sandstone abundant in many parts of the world, and chiefly composed of granite and gneiss sediments.

Origin

  1. The final mineralogy, texture and chemical composition of a granite is often distinctive as to its origin.

Common Igneous Rocks

  1. In some megmatites geologists find evidence for the origin of one of Earth's most common igneous rocks, granite.

Small Crystals

  1. If you look at granite, you will see that it is made up of small crystals of feldspar, quartz and mica.

Quarries

  1. At the granite quarries, in quartz veins, with Epidote (Stuart Thomson and H.). Aberdeenshire.
  2. Lunch meal is served aboard the cruise, followed by a guided tour to visit the High Dam, the Granite Quarries, and the Temple of Philae.
  3. Most of the granite used in the ancient Egyptian tombs, temples and obelisks came from the quarries in the Aswan area.

Hardness

  1. Because of its hardness and comparative cheapness in relation to marble, granite is often used to make kitchen countertops.

Crystalline Rocks

  1. Crystalline rocks with obsidian's composition include granite and rhyolite.

Porphyry

  1. If the rock is a granite but with a porphyritic texture it would be a granite porphyry.
  2. Granite Porphyry.jpg Hand sample of igneous rock granite porphyry.
  3. Orthoclase In blue-quartz porphyry and granite porphyry.

Sandstone

  1. Arkose is a sand or sandstone with considerable feldspar content which is derived from the weathering and erosion of a (usually nearby) granite.
  2. The original rock prior to metamorphism could be shale, basalt, granite, sandstone, and tuff, to name a few.
  3. Granite, sandstone, clay, limestone, slate often form whole provinces and build up lofty mountains.

Countertops

  1. There is some concern that materials sold as granite countertops or as building material may be hazardous to health.
  2. Granite countertops will continue to remain a favorite of homeowners, architects and interior designers.
  3. A kitchen granite countertop is unique in that no two pieces of granite are exactly the same, therefore no two countertops are alike.

Associated

  1. It is of igneous origin and occurs associated with granite and crystalline schists.
  2. Uranium is also found associated with certain igenous rocks, such as granite and porphyry.
  3. Diorite may occur independently, but is often associated with granite and gabbro intrusions, with which the rock sometimes merges.

Plutons

  1. The Sierras are not one huge mass of granite, they are made up of many large masses of igneous rock called plutons.
  2. Magma from the melting oceanic plate rose and created plutons of solid granite, deep below the surface.

Intrusive Rock

  1. Common examples of igneous rocks are basalt (an extrusive rock), granite (an intrusive rock) and andesite (a hypabyssal rock).

Felspar

  1. Granite generally contains more felspar than quartz, and more quartz than mica.
  2. In pegmatite (graphic granite) and granophyre it often forms a regular intergrowth with felspar.
  3. FELSPAR. Wherever granite rocks occur.

Fine-Grained

  1. Small slender prismatic crystals are common in a fine-grained granite called aplite, often forming radial daisy-like patterns.
  2. The rock is gray, fine-grained granite intruded by lighter granitic veins.
  3. The most common variety, which is the fine-grained or volcanic equivalent of granite, is called rhyolite.

Extrusive Igneous Rock

  1. Rhyolite - A fine-grained, extrusive igneous rock which has the same chemical composition as granite.

Dimension Stone

  1. Granite has been extensively used as a dimension stone and as flooring tiles in public and commercial buildings and monuments.

Tonalite

  1. Coarse-grained, tonalite is somewhat like granite in appearance, but is often darker in color.

Quartz Diorite

  1. Rocks ranging from quartz diorite to granite are commonly found in batholiths.

Felsic Igneous Rocks

  1. Quartz is an essential constituent of granite and other felsic igneous rocks.

Coarse Grained

  1. Basalt is fine grained because it cools very rapidly, whereas gabbro and granite are coarse grained because they have cooled slowly.
  2. Syenite is a hard, coarse grained, green to pink coloured stone, commonly used as polished cladding and difficult to distinguish from granite.

Intrusive

  1. Granite is a common and widely occurring type of intrusive, felsic, igneous rock.
  2. Felsic magmas produce rocks such as granite (if intrusive; this is the most common felsic rock), or rhyolites (if extrusive).
  3. Some examples are: Rhyolite (extrusive) and granite (intrusive).

Diabase

  1. If this model age is close to the crystallization age, then diabase in the Panhandle terrane is approximately coeval with the granite and rhyolite.
  2. Four main types are present-rhyolite porphyry, granite, syenite porphyry, and andesite porphyry; diabase also occurs in small amount.
  3. Diabase is one of the dark rocks known commercially as “black granite.

Dykes

  1. Dykes are common and intrusions of gabbro and fine-grained granite (granophyre) occur, especially within ruins of differentiated central volcanos.
  2. For example, dykes are often associated with granite intrusions and these also have a granitic texture.

Earth

  1. Essentially, Earth's continents are slabs of granite sitting on top of molten rock.
  2. Granite, like marble and other popular stones, are as old as the earth.
  3. Movements in the Earth trapped the oil and natural gas in the reservoir rocks between layers of impermeable rock, or cap rock, such as granite or marble.

Coarse-Grained Igneous Rock

  1. The last sample at this station is pegmatitic granite (Station 3C). A Pegmatite is a very coarse-grained igneous rock, typically granite.

Granites

  1. Signatures of Granites Because of its hardness and comparative cheapness in relation to marble, granite is often used to make kitchen countertops.
  2. It is found in granite pegmatites, in contact-metamorphic deposits (especially limestones intruded by granites), and in quartz veins.
  3. Tourmaline is a mineral of widespread occurrence and is found in granite pegmatites, pneumatolytic veins and granites.

Quartzite

  1. Locally veinlike aggregates of quartz are developed at the contact, and masses of quartzite up to a foot in diameter are included in the granite.
  2. Other enclosures, more certainly of foreign origin, are often seen, such as quartzite, schists, garnetiferous rocks, granite, etc.
  3. Fault s along the border with the South Province have deposited metamorphic schists and quartzite s, with some granite.

Common Constituent

  1. Expect to find orthoclase as a common constituent of granite and matrix material in rhyolite.

Slow Cooling

  1. For examples, granite is formed by slow cooling of molten material (within the earth).
  2. Now granite is slow cooling to begin with, and has by definition, large (visible to the naked eye) crystals.
  3. That comes because granite forms by slow cooling under ground, and develops large crystals.

Large Crystals

  1. Granite is light colored and is composed of large crystals of the minerals quartz, feldspar, and mica.
  2. Granite has large crystals and rhyolite has small crystals.
  3. Granite is an example of a rock that cooled slowly and has large crystals.

Metamorphic Rock

  1. A large boulder of granite, gneiss, or other igneous or metamorphic rock may have come from Canada.
  2. Quartz is a common component of granite, sandstone, limestone, and many other igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rock.

Metamorphic Rocks

  1. Quartz is a common constituent of granite, sandstone, limestone, and many other igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks.
  2. It can be told from pyroxene by cleavage and is found in igneous and metamorphic rocks, including often granite.
  3. Albite is common in igneous rocks, especially granite, and in metamorphic rocks that formed at low temperatures.

Categories

  1. Matter > Materials > Rocks > Igneous Rocks
  2. Basalt
  3. Quartz
  4. Nature > Matter > Stone > Limestone
  5. Marble

Related Keywords

    * Aswan * Basalt * Batholiths * Biotite * Black Granite * Coarse-Grained * Composition * Continental Crust * Crust * Crystals * Darker * Diorite * Feldspar * Feldspars * Felsic Rocks * Form * Gabbro * Gneiss * Gneisses * Granite Composition * Granite Pegmatite * Granite Rocks * Granodiorite * Hornblende * Igneous Rock * Igneous Rocks * Intrusive Igneous Rock * Intrusive Igneous Rocks * Limestone * Magma * Marble * Mica * Micas * Minerals * Orthoclase * Pegmatite * Pegmatites * Pink * Pink Granite * Potassium Feldspar * Pyramid * Pyramids * Quartz * Red Granite * Rhyolite * Rock * Rocks * Schist * Silica * Statue * Statues * Stone * Stones * Surface * Syenite * Syenites * Texture * Tourmaline
  1. Books about "Granite" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Granite"
  Originally created: August 01, 2010.
  Please send us comments and questions by this Online Form
  Please click on Move Up to move good phrases up.
0.0288 sec. a=1..