KeyWEn.com  
 
 
 
Ground State       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Hydrogen Atom > Ground State   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
ENERGY STATE
LOW-LYING
SINGLET STATE
GROUND STATE ELECTRONIC CONFIGURATION
GROUND STATE HADRON
GROUND STATE CONFIGURATION
HIGHER ENERGY
LOWER STATE
LYMAN SERIES
ORIGINAL GROUND STATE
GROUND STATE ORBIT
GROUND STATE ISOMER
LOWEST ENERGY
LEVEL
WAY
MOLECULES
MATTER
FIGURE
RESPECT
FALL
SMALLER
DEFINITION
CASE
SYSTEMS
SYSTEM
FLAVOUR
CONVERGENCE
ORBITS
PARTICLES
POSITION
ORBITAL
SPECTRUM
ZERO
DECAY
NUMBER
HENCE
FIRST
DEGENERATE
FERMIONS
NITROGEN
NITROGEN ATOM
STABLE
LOWER
LOWER LEVELS
HYDROGEN ATOMS
HYDROGEN ATOM
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Ground State"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. The ground state is the lowest energy level a hydrogen atom can sink to (according to modern physics). (Web site)
  2. The ground state is defined at zero magnetic field. (Web site)

Energy State

  1. This energy state is unstable, therefore it will return to the ground state by lowering its energy. (Web site)

Low-Lying

  1. Configuration interaction calculations on the X 1 Sigma + ground state and low-lying A 1 Pi and 1 Delta excited states of the PN molecule.

Singlet State

  1. If the energy of the singlet state is sufficiently reduced it will actually become the ground state. (Web site)

Ground State Electronic Configuration

  1. An approximate procedure for writing the ground state electronic configuration of atoms. (Web site)

Ground State Hadron

  1. Each ground state hadron may have several excited states; several hundreds of resonances have been observed in particle physics experiments. (Web site)

Ground State Configuration

  1. Write the ground state configuration of any atom.

Higher Energy

  1. After absorbing energy, an electron may jump from the ground state to a higher energy excited state. (Web site)
  2. Normally, an atom is found in its lowest-energy ground state; states with higher energy are called excited state s.
  3. Normally, an atom is found in its lowest-energy ground state; states with higher energy are called excited states.

Lower State

  1. An excited electron almost immediately drops to a lower state and continues dropping until the atom returns to its ground state. (Web site)

Lyman Series

  1. The Lyman series is caused by electrons relaxing directly to the ground state. (Web site)

Original Ground State

  1. The excited electron may still be bound to the nucleus and should, after a certain period of time, decay back to the original ground state. (Web site)

Ground State Orbit

  1. In the Bohr atom, all orbit energies are scaled according to the energy of the orbit closest to the nucleus, the ground state orbit.
  2. This also means that wavelengths of emitted light will be scaled in proportion to the energy of the ground state orbit of the atom.

Ground State Isomer

  1. They succeeded in synthesising 8 atoms of 270 Ds, relating to a ground state isomer, 270g Ds, and a high-spin K-isomer, 270m Ds.
  2. The measured half-life is close to the expected value for ground state isomer, 277a Hs. (Web site)

Lowest Energy

  1. The state of lowest energy is the one in which the atom is normally found and is called the ground state.

Level

  1. For example, suppose that an electron starts at the n=3 level (we'll call this the excited state) and it falls down to n=1 (the ground state). (Web site)

Way

  1. When an atom is in an excited state, the electron can drop all the way to the ground state, or stop in an intermediate level. (Web site)

Molecules

  1. It means, rather, that all atoms and molecules are in the ground state)[ 2].

Matter

  1. Matter is in its ground state,[ 2] and contains no thermal energy.

Figure

  1. Figure 3.3: Ground state wave function of the hydrogen atom.

Respect

  1. The Ginzburg-Landau ground state does not respect this gauge symmetry, and nor does the ground state of the full Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer model. (Web site)

Fall

  1. Similarly, vacuum fluctuations cause an excited atom to fall into its ground state. (Web site)

Smaller

  1. The right hand side is never smaller than the smallest value of V(x); in particular, the ground state energy is positive when V(x) is everywhere positive.

Definition

  1. In 1980 the CIPM clarified the above definition, defining that the carbon-12 atoms are unbound and in their ground state. (Web site)

Case

  1. In the case of hydrogen, all transitions ending at the ground state produce ultraviolet photons. (Web site)
  2. The excited electron may still be bound to the nucleus, in which case they should, after a certain period of time, decay back to the original ground state.

Systems

  1. These systems could release stimulated emission without falling to the ground state, thus maintaining a population inversion.
  2. Many systems, such as crystal lattices, have a unique ground state, and therefore have zero entropy at absolute zero (since ln(1) = 0). (Web site)

System

  1. At very low temperatures, atoms can all occupy the ground state of the system thus giving a coherent matter analogous to the laser. (Web site)

Flavour

  1. One can extend this multiplet in SU(4) flavour (with the inclusion of the charm quark) to the ground state 20 -plet.

Convergence

  1. The low-lying states can be efficiently separated from the ground state by the diagonalization, leading to considerably better convergence. (Web site)
  2. The accuracy of the simulations and the convergence of the solution to the vortex ground state was verified using a range of numerical diagnostics.

Orbits

  1. Therefore, if the ground state orbit has an energy change, all other orbits will scale their energy proportionally.

Particles

  1. Below a certain temperature, most of the particles in a bosonic system will occupy the ground state (the state of lowest energy). (Web site)
  2. The resulting arrangement of molecules or particles is a "ground state," which often is an ordered crystal structure.

Position

  1. An electron that is not located in the Ground State, or position of greatest stability, will be located in the Excited State.

Orbital

  1. An atom is said to be in an excited state when an electron occupies an orbital other than the ground state. (Web site)
  2. When a hydrogen atom is in its ground state, the radius of the orbital is about 0.05 nm (0.5 Å). (Web site)

Spectrum

  1. The spectrum consists of a tachyon in the ground state of the left-moving sector.

Zero

  1. But there is no obvious reason why the energy of this ground state should be zero. (Web site)
  2. In this definition, the critical pressure is zero: the true ground state of matter is always quark matter.
  3. We find the expectation value of ground state orbital angular momentum is zero. (Web site)

Decay

  1. The atom will again decay into the ground state.

Number

  1. The ground state has an energy and is -fold degenerate, where is the number of sites in the system.
  2. Bose condensation occurs when a macroscopic (from a thermodynamic point of view) number of particles are in the ground state.
  3. Figures 3a and 3b below show the differential decay rates for &Omega c &rarr &Xi(*), for a number of ground state &Xi as well as a couple of excited states. (Web site)

Hence

  1. Hence, the energy of the ground state is 0. (Web site)

First

  1. A good estimate of the size of this minimum amount is the energy of the first excited state of that degree of freedom above its ground state. (Web site)

Degenerate

  1. The ground state of the nucleus is then degenerate. (Web site)

Fermions

  1. In the ground state this number equals the number of fermions in the system.

Nitrogen

  1. Most carbenes have a nonlinear triplet ground state with the exception of carbenes with nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur atoms, and dihalocarbenes.

Nitrogen Atom

  1. The ground state of the nitrogen atom has five electrons in its valence shell needing three electrons to complete its octet.

Stable

  1. This is not a realistic theory --- it does not have fermions, and as far as is known has no stable ground state.
  2. However, the hydrogen atom both possesses a stable ground state and emits radiation at only a discrete set of frequencies. (Web site)
  3. Only the lowest energy bound state, the ground state is stable. (Web site)

Lower

  1. Lower bound for the ground state energy of the no-pair Hamiltonian.

Lower Levels

  1. An excited atom's electrons will spontaneously fall into lower levels, emitting excess energy as a photon s, until it returns to the ground state.

Hydrogen Atoms

  1. All of the hydrogen atoms in the beam will be in their ground state with l = 0 and hence they will not possess an orbital magnetic moment. (Web site)

Hydrogen Atom

  1. If we inputted a quanta of EM enegy into a hydrogen atom, the electron will kick up into a higher state and then drop back down to ground state. (Web site)
  2. This is the "normal" (most stable) state of the hydrogen atom, and is called the ground state. (Web site)
  3. And this is exactly what we see in the ground state of the Hydrogen atom. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Hydrogen Atom
  2. Encyclopedia of Finance. > Technology > Energy > Electron
  3. Society > Politics > Government > State
  4. Encyclopedia of Finance. > Technology > Energy
  5. Emitting

Related Keywords

    * Angular Momentum * Atom * Atomic Number * Atoms * Aufbau Principle * Bohr Model * Conduction Band * Electron * Electrons * Emission * Emitting * Energy * Energy Level * Excitation * Excitation Energy * Extra Energy * Gamma Ray * Ground State Energy * Half-Life * Higher Energy State * Hydrogen * Lowest * Lowest Energy State * Mean * Neutron * Nucleons * Nucleus * Oxygen Molecule * Phonons * Photon * Photons * Possible * Quantum * Quantum Harmonic Oscillator * State * States * Vacuum * Valence Band * Zero-Point Energy * Zero Temperature
  1. Books about "Ground State" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Ground State"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Links checked: May 14, 2013.
  Please send us comments and questions by this Online Form
  Please click on Move Up to move good phrases up.
0.0146 sec. a=1..