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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Meiosis > Haploid   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
FEMALE GAMETOPHYTE
DIPLOID PHASE
PRODUCING FOUR HAPLOID NUCLEI
DIPLOID STAGE
HAPLOID SPORE
FORM HAPLOID SPORES
HAPLOID NUMBER
FOUR HAPLOID NUCLEI
DIPLOID CELL
HAPLOID GAMETES
HAPLOID NUCLEI
HYPOTHESIS
PAIRS
SINGLE
DIVISIONS
DIVISION
LIFE
PLANT
FEMALE
TOPICS
FIGURE
CONTAINING
CASES
SURFACE
SPOROPHYTE
GENERATIONS
PARENT
PHASE
PHASES
INDIVIDUALS
NUMBER
SET
SETS
COPY
SPECIES
MUSHROOM
ORGANISMS
DIFFERENTIATION
HALF
FILAMENTS
YEAST
YEASTS
SPERM CELLS
EGG
PROCESS
FUSION
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Haploid"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Female Gametophyte

  1. In gymnosperms, such as conifers, the food storage tissue is part of the female gametophyte, a haploid tissue.
  2. The ovule is composed of diploid maternal tissue that gives rise to the haploid tissue of the female gametophyte.

Diploid Phase

  1. The organism is haploid, and has no diploid phase, except for the sexual sporangium.
  2. The dominant phase is haploid, while the diploid phase is only a few cells (often only the single celled zygote, as in Chlamydomonas).
  3. In the whole cycle, gametes are usually the only haploid cells, and mitosis usually occurs only in the diploid phase.

Producing Four Haploid Nuclei

  1. The nuclei fuse in the ascus, and the resulting diploid nucleus immediately undergoes meiosis, producing four haploid nuclei.
  2. Meiosis occurs producing four haploid nuclei.

Diploid Stage

  1. Most fungi have both an haploid and diploid stage in their life cycles.

Haploid Spore

  1. Ascospore: A haploid spore produced within an ascus following karyogamy and meiosis.
  2. In the primary stage, a haploid spore germinates and grows a germ tube, which develops into mycelium.
  3. Each nucleus with cytoplasm forms a haploid spore with a tough resistant wall.

Form Haploid Spores

  1. The zygote divides by meiosis to form haploid spores.

Haploid Number

  1. The chromosome number is halved from the diploid number (2n) to the haploid number (n).

Four Haploid Nuclei

  1. Meiosis then gives rise to four haploid nuclei, usually followed by a further mitotic division that results in eight nuclei in each ascus.
  2. Each cell swells to form a diploid basidium, which rapidly undergoes meiosis and yields four haploid nuclei.
  3. Meiosis occurs giving rise to four haploid nuclei, three of which disintegrate leaving a single haploid nucleus in each spore.

Diploid Cell

  1. Nuclei fuse (diploid cell), meiosis occurs, and haploid spores are formed and dispersed.
  2. A diploid cell may also undergo meiosis to produce haploid cells, usually four.
  3. In meiosis, a diploid cell divides to produce four haploid cells, each with half the original chromosome content.

Haploid Gametes

  1. The gametophyte produces haploid gametes which fuse to form a diploid zygotic sporophyte.
  2. Fertilzation happens when the two haploid gametes fuse together, giving rise to a diploid cell that is totipotent, i.e.

Haploid Nuclei

  1. Ultimately, the two haploid nuclei in each basidium fuse (karyogamy) to form a diploid nucleus.
  2. This is unlike the true Fungi in which most of the mycelium is divided into cells by cross-walls, with each cell containing one, two, or more haploid nuclei.
  3. Second, the two haploid nuclei inside the basidium fuse together to form a diploid zygote.

Hypothesis

  1. We tested the hypothesis that truffles are primarily haploid and reproduce by outcrossing.
  2. This hypothesis is in accordance with the fact that only haploid cells are ever isolated, so that if diploid cells are formed, they must sporulate readily.

Pairs

  1. If different mating types are involved, fusion between pairs of haploid nuclei occurs immediately.

Single

  1. From a developmental point of view, androgenesis is a rewarding system for understanding the process of embryo formation from single, haploid microspores.

Divisions

  1. A diploid cell duplicates itself, then undergoes two divisions (tetraploid to diploid to haploid), in the process forming four haploid cells.

Division

  1. The female gametophyte of angiosperms, formed from the growth and division of the megaspore into a multicellular structure with eight haploid nuclei.

Life

  1. In these groups, the two genetic types of haploid nuclei from two individuals my coexist & divide in the same hyphae for most of the life of fungus.
  2. The life of a hornwort starts from a haploid spore.

Plant

  1. Although plant s have an additional step, meiosis eventually results in the production of haploid gametes.

Female

  1. The sexual cycle gets going when terminal cells in the hyphae undergo meiosis and differentiate into haploid gametes, some male and others female.

Topics

  1. Meiosis, comparision to Mitosis synapsis and tetrad formation variation reduction of chromosomes (diploid to haploid) [ Topics] 6.
  2. Anaphase II, Telophase II and cytokinesis, four daughter cells are now formed and are haploid [ Topics] 5.

Figure

  1. Figure 5. dhMotC sensitivity of haploid strains deleted of cell death-related genes.

Containing

  1. The ascus is a sac-like cell generally containing eight haploid ascospores.

Cases

  1. This plant creates by meiosis single-celled bodies called spores (haploid) which are shed and dispersed by the wind (or in some cases, by floating on water).

Surface

  1. Female cone develops two ovules on the upper surface of each cone scale; each ovule contains haploid megaspore.

Sporophyte

  1. The sporophyte undergoes meiosis to form haploid spores that, in turn, form gametophytes.

Generations

  1. Foraminifera undergo a heteromorphic alternation of generations between a haploid gamont and a diploid agamont phases.

Parent

  1. They are haploid cells genetically identical to the haploid parent, can develop into a new organism if conditions are favorable, and serve in dispersal.
  2. This could be considered an expression of conflict between the haploid parent and its diploid offspring.
  3. The secondary mycelium is dikaryotic, in that it has two haploid nuclei, one from each parent.

Phase

  1. Protonema A protonema is a thread-like chain of cells that forms the earliest stage (the haploid phase) of a bryophyte life cycle.
  2. In the whole cycle, zygotes are the only diploid cell; mitosis occurs only in the haploid phase.
  3. H Haploid - The chromosome number of the gametophytic generation or phase or having a single complete set of chromosomes.

Phases

  1. Typically they have ways of switching between the two phases: diploid -- haploid = meiosis (typically), haploid -- diploid = syngamy (again, roughly).
  2. When you look at an angiosperm in flower you are looking at both diploid (sporophytic) and haploid (gametophytic) phases of the life cycle.

Individuals

  1. These haploid individuals give rise to gametes through mitosis.
  2. The macrocyst then undergoes meiosis and mitosis and releases haploid individuals.
  3. These haploid individuals give rise to gamete s through mitosis.

Number

  1. Euploid: The situation which exists when the nucleus of a cell contains exact multiples of the haploid number of chromosomes.
  2. The haploid number (n) is the number of chromosomes in a gamete of an individual.
  3. When gametes are formed the diploid number is reduced by half to the haploid number (n) by meiosis.

Set

  1. Meiosis results in four rather than two daughter cells, each with a haploid set of chromosomes.
  2. Nuclear envelopes reform and cleavage or cell wall formation eventually produces a total of four daughter cells, each with a haploid set of chromosomes.
  3. The resulting spores inherit a haploid set of chromosomes.

Sets

  1. Meiosis reduces the number of sets of chromosomes from two to one (i.e., produces haploid gametes from diploid gametocytes).

Copy

  1. Finally, most fungi are haploid (contain only one copy of the blueprints) for most of their life.
  2. Haploid (meaning simple in Greek) cells have only one copy of each chromosome.
  3. Haploid cells have one copy of each chromosome, while diploid cells have homologous pairs of each chromosome.

Species

  1. Among the species of fungi, the spores in which the haploid nuclei are first disseminated are known in biological terminology as meiospores.

Mushroom

  1. This group bears haploid spores on cells called basidia, which reside in the cap of a mushroom.

Organisms

  1. Since gonococci behave as haploid organisms, this suggests that cell division partitions identical copies of the genome into daughter cells.
  2. Microbial eukaryotes can be either haploid or diploid, and some organisms have multiple cell nuclei (see coenocyte).
  3. In such organisms, gametes are the only haploid cells in the life cycle.

Differentiation

  1. In the zygotic life cycle the species is haploid instead, spawned by the proliferation and differentiation of a single haploid cell called the gamete.

Half

  1. The four daughter cells that are produced are each haploid, having only half the number of chromosomes as the original diploid cell.
  2. Meiosis produces haploid cells, or ones that have half the number of chromosomes as are in a normal cell for that species.
  3. Because these expanding hyphae are haploid, containing only half of the required genetic code, they cannot grow into a mushroom.

Filaments

  1. The nuclei within the filaments are diploid, with two sets of genetic information, not haploid as in the fungi.

Yeast

  1. At this point, haploid cells of opposite mating type (and a) fuse, returning the yeast to the diploid state.
  2. Most of the Ustilaginomycetes are dimorphic, producing a yeast or yeast-like phase in the haploid state.

Yeasts

  1. Most yeasts and filamentous Ascomycota are haploid, but some species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae for example, can also be diploid.
  2. Haploid cells may divide to form more haploid cells, as in many yeasts, but the haploid phase is not the predominant life cycle phase.

Sperm Cells

  1. Sperm cells are haploid sex cells of the male.

Egg

  1. If the egg is fertilized, the ant will be female (diploid); if not, it will be male (haploid).

Process

  1. In biology, meiosis (IPA:) is the process by which one diploid eukaryotic cell divides to generate four haploid cells often called gamete s.
  2. Haploid gametes are produced from diploid cells by a process called meiosis.
  3. The process is not properly sexual, however, because there are no haploid gametes formed.

Fusion

  1. The process involves fusion of haploid nuclei in a heterokaryon, mitotic crossing over followed by haploidisation (Holliday, 1989).
  2. Sexual reproduction involved the fusion of haploid mating hyphae to produce a diploid zygospore, a process shown in Figure 4.
  3. In some fungi the fusion of two haploid cells immediately results in diploid cells (2n).

Categories

  1. Meiosis
  2. Diploid
  3. Spores
  4. Chromosomes
  5. Nature > Life > Animals > Zygote

Related Keywords

    * Algae * Alternation * Asci * Ascomycetes * Ascospores * Asexually * Asexual Reproduction * Basidiospores * Budding * Cell * Cells * Cell Division * Cell Fusion * Cerevisiae * Chromosome * Chromosomes * Conidia * Daughter Cells * Dikaryotic * Diploid * Diploid Zygote * Eukaryotes * Form * Forming * Forms * Fruiting Body * Fungi * Gamete * Gametes * Gametophyte * Germination * Haploid Ascospores * Haploid Cells * Haploid Hyphae * Haploid Mycelium * Haploid Nucleus * Haploid Spores * Homologous Chromosomes * Hypha * Hyphae * Karyogamy * Life Cycle * Males * Mating * Meiosis * Mitosis * Mosses * Mycelia * Mycelium * Nuclei * Nucleus * Offspring * Organism * Ovum * Plants * Reproductive Cells * Sexually * Sexual Reproduction * Sperm * Sporangia * Sporangium * Spore * Spores * Zygote
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  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
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