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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Solar Wind > Interstellar Medium   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
HH OBJECTS
INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM SURROUNDING
GRAINS
INTERACTION
IMPORTANT
PARTICLES
MEASURE
AMBIENT
COMETS
ELEMENTS
ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION
MILKY WAY GALAXY
EARLIEST FORMS
ASTRONOMERS
GALAXIES
INTERSTELLAR CLOUD
INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS
HYDROGEN
ROTATING DISK
COMMON COMPONENT
COSMIC RAYS
REGION
HELIOPAUSE
INTERSTELLAR SPACE
INFRARED ASTRONOMY
ASTROPHYSICS
SUN
OUTER LAYERS
BUBBLE
GASES
DUST PARTICLES
MILKY WAY
DUST
LOCAL BUBBLE
ISM
SUPERNOVA
SUPERNOVAE
SOLAR SYSTEM
GALAXY
HEAVY ELEMENTS
HELIOSPHERE
SOLAR WIND
INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Interstellar Medium"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. The interstellar medium is the dust and gas (mostly hydrogen) that are between stars in a galaxy. (Web site)
  2. The interstellar medium is sparsely filled with gas molecules and dust particles. (Web site)

Hh Objects

  1. Emission from HH objects is caused by shock waves when they collide with the interstellar medium, but their motions are complicated. (Web site)

Interstellar Medium Surrounding

  1. An example of this is the ring galaxy, which possesses a ring-like structure of stars and interstellar medium surrounding a bare core.

Grains

  1. The probes spend several (subjective) years being bombarded by cosmic radiation and grains of dust in the interstellar medium. (Web site)

Interaction

  1. Herbig-Haro objects are caused by the interaction of polar jets with the interstellar medium.

Important

  1. Also important are their extreme isotopic compositions, which are expected to exist nowhere in the interstellar medium. (Web site)

Particles

  1. Neutrinos are the only known particles that are not significantly attenuated by their travel through the interstellar medium. (Web site)

Measure

  1. It will measure the diffuse extreme ultraviolet glow that will better define the properties and physical processes associated with the interstellar medium. (Web site)

Ambient

  1. Once subsonic, the solar wind may be affected by the ambient flow of the interstellar medium. (Web site)

Comets

  1. Targets for a dust telescope are the local interstellar medium and nearby star forming regions, as well as comets and asteroids.

Elements

  1. These other elements were produced inside stars and during supernova explosions, and were disbursed into the interstellar medium by supernova remnants.

Ultraviolet Radiation

  1. The hydrogen atoms of the interstellar medium are ionized by the ultraviolet radiation from a nearby star or stars. (Web site)

Milky Way Galaxy

  1. Starting with a view of our Milky Way galaxy, the orange gas in the animation represents the interstellar medium. (Web site)

Earliest Forms

  1. They are also found in the interstellar medium, in comets, and in meteorites and are a candidate molecule to act as a basis for the earliest forms of life. (Web site)

Astronomers

  1. Astronomers also can use supernova light echoes to measure the structure and nature of the interstellar medium.

Galaxies

  1. Stars and stellar evolution; interstellar medium; galaxies and galaxy clusters; cosmology. (Web site)
  2. Relativistic plasmas are found in such astronomical objects as supernova remnants, radio galaxies, the interstellar medium and the nuclei of galaxies. (Web site)

Interstellar Cloud

  1. Put differently, an interstellar cloud is a denser-than-average region of the interstellar medium. (Web site)

Interstellar Clouds

  1. However, from time to time local increases in pressure of the interstellar medium cause the additional compression of interstellar clouds. (Web site)

Hydrogen

  1. According to Lin, the neutral atoms are probably hydrogen, since most of the particles in the local interstellar medium are hydrogen. (Web site)

Rotating Disk

  1. Spiral galaxies consist of a rotating disk of stars and interstellar medium, along with a central bulge of generally older stars.

Common Component

  1. Generally speaking, hydrogen gas is the most common component of the interstellar medium (the vast space between stars and planetary systems in galaxies). (Web site)

Cosmic Rays

  1. The spallation process results from the impact of cosmic rays (mostly fast protons) against the interstellar medium. (Web site)

Region

  1. The heliosheath is the region of roiled plasma between the shock front and the interstellar medium. (Web site)

Heliopause

  1. The bow shock, outside the heliopause, is a turbulent region caused by the pressure of the advancing heliopause against the interstellar medium. (Web site)
  2. The position of the heliopause depends both on the strength of the solar wind and on the properties of the local interstellar medium. (Web site)

Interstellar Space

  1. Carbonyl sulfide has been observed in the interstellar medium, see also List of molecules in interstellar space.

Infrared Astronomy

  1. Current research includes the interstellar medium, globular cluster formation, infrared astronomy, and near-Earth objects. (Web site)

Astrophysics

  1. Astrophysics the study of the physics of stars, galaxies, and the interstellar medium.

Sun

  1. The "bow shock" shown is the bow shock caused by the sun as it moves through the interstellar medium; the Earth is too small to be seen on this scale.
  2. It is hypothesized that the Sun also has a bow shock produced in its travels within the interstellar medium, as shown in the figure. (Web site)
  3. It then slows down and gets turned in the direction of the ambient flow of the interstellar medium to form a comet-like tail behind the Sun. (Web site)

Outer Layers

  1. The ejected outer layers will form what is known as a planetary nebula, returning some of the material that formed the Sun to the interstellar medium.
  2. A large amount of mass is lost at this stage as the outer layers are returned to the interstellar medium. (Web site)

Bubble

  1. As the solar wind flows from the sun, it carves out a bubble in the interstellar medium. (Web site)

Gases

  1. At some distance from the Sun, well beyond the orbit of Neptune, this supersonic wind must slow down to meet the gases in the interstellar medium. (Web site)

Dust Particles

  1. For example, grains in dense clouds have acquired a mantle of ice and on average are larger than dust particles in the diffuse interstellar medium. (Web site)

Milky Way

  1. A spiral galaxy like the Milky Way contains stars, stellar remnants and a diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) of gas and dust.

Dust

  1. The total mass of the gas and dust in the interstellar medium is about 15% of the total mass of visible matter in the Milky Way.
  2. Galaxies are composed up of stars, interstellar medium of gases, dust and dark matter.
  3. Interstellar astrophysics - the study of the interstellar medium, intergalactic medium and dust.

Local Bubble

  1. The Sun sits near the center of a roughly cylindrical region of space known as the "Local Bubble" where the interstellar medium is relatively thin.

Ism

  1. The LIC resides in a low-density hole in the interstellar medium (ISM) called the Local Bubble, shown in black.
  2. The Loop I Bubble is a cavity in the local interstellar medium (ISM) that abuts the Local Bubble in which the Sun is located. (Web site)
  3. The Loop II Bubble is a cavity in the local interstellar medium (ISM) located in the Orion Arm of the Milky Way Galaxy.

Supernova

  1. These huge stars quickly supernova, releasing heavy elements into the interstellar medium. (Web site)
  2. In particular, the distribution of matter in the interstellar medium surrounding the supernova is important. (Web site)

Supernovae

  1. The outflow from supernovae and the stellar wind of large stars play an important part in shaping the interstellar medium. (Web site)
  2. If so, these huge stars would have quickly consumed their supply of fuel and became supernovae, releasing heavy elements into the interstellar medium.
  3. Supernovae tend to enrich the surrounding interstellar medium with metals —elements other than hydrogen and helium. (Web site)

Solar System

  1. Its science objective was to discover the nature of the interactions between the solar wind and the interstellar medium at the edge of our solar system. (Web site)

Galaxy

  1. The Interstellar Medium The region between the stars in a galaxy like the Milky Way is far from empty. (Web site)
  2. As a consequence of the galaxy's interaction with the intracluster medium in the Virgo Cluster, the galaxy has lost much of its interstellar medium.
  3. The processed material becomes part of the interstellar medium in the galaxy. (Web site)

Heavy Elements

  1. The seeding of the interstellar medium by heavy elements eventually allowed the formation of terrestrial planets like the Earth.

Heliosphere

  1. The outer surface of the heliosheath, where the heliosphere meets the interstellar medium, is called the heliopause. (Web site)
  2. The termination shock is the region of the heliosphere where the supersonic solar wind slows to subsonic speed as it merges with the interstellar medium. (Web site)
  3. The heliosphere is the cavity around the Sun in the local interstellar medium that is produced by the solar wind.

Solar Wind

  1. The edge of this region is the termination shock, the point at which the solar wind collides with the opposing winds of the interstellar medium. (Web site)
  2. The solar wind creates the heliosphere, a vast bubble in the interstellar medium that surrounds the solar system. (Web site)
  3. The point at which the solar wind meets the interstellar medium, which is the "solar" wind from other stars, is called the heliopause. (Web site)

Interstellar Medium

  1. A galaxy is a massive, gravitationally bound system consisting of stars, an interstellar medium of gas and dust, and dark matter. (Web site)
  2. Heliosphere The region around the Sun where the solar wind dominates over the interstellar medium. (Web site)
  3. The heliosphere is a bubble in space "blown" into the interstellar medium (the hydrogen and helium gas that permeates the galaxy) by the solar wind. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Solar Wind
  2. Heliosphere
  3. Heavy Elements
  4. Gravitationally
  5. Astronomy > Universe > Stars > Supernovae
  6. Books about "Interstellar Medium" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Interstellar Medium"
  Originally created: November 22, 2006.
  Links checked: April 21, 2013.
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