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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nature > Life > Animals > Gastrulation > Invagination   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
SECONDARY INVAGINATION
TOOTH
CASES
DEFINITION
TWIST
FISSURE
MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES
BLASTOCOEL
FORM
VENTRICLES
DENS
HYPHA
VESICLE
ORIFICE
EMBRYO
ENDODERM
BLASTULA
ARCHENTERON
ECTODERM
GASTRULATION
INVAGINATION
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Invagination"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. The invagination is pinched off, leaving the engulfed material in the membrane-enclosed vacuole and the cell membrane intact. (Web site)
  2. This invagination is termed the proctodeum, and it meets with the entoderm of the hind-gut and forms with it the anal membrane. (Web site)
  3. This invagination is caused by tuft of capillaries, called a glomerulus, pushing into and becoming surrounded by Bowman's capsule. (Web site)
  4. Primary invagination is thought to result from changes in the shape of cells in the vegetal plate. (Web site)
  5. Secondary invagination is thought to involve filapodia extended by the secondary mesenchyme cells located at the tip of the archenteron. (Web site)

Secondary Invagination

  1. Secondary invagination also involves convergent extension. (Web site)

Tooth

  1. It is a developmental anomaly caused by an epithelial invagination during the development of the tooth.

Cases

  1. In all cases there wasno evidence of epithelial invagination, bone loss, or infection. (Web site)

Definition

  1. Definition of invagination in the Medical Dictionary.

Twist

  1. In children, abdominal pain usually means gastro-intestinal derangement, such as gastritis, enteritis, twist, invagination, colitis, appendicitis. (Web site)

Fissure

  1. In cases in which the invagination (or fissure) fails to fully close, colobomas will be formed.

Morphological Changes

  1. Caenorhabditis elegans vulval epithelial cells undergo morphological changes that generate an invagination through the formation of seven stacked rings.

Blastocoel

  1. This buckles inwards towards the blastocoel in a process called invagination. (Web site)

Form

  1. At the dorsal marginal zone, cells change from a columnar shape to become a bottle cell and form an invagination.

Ventricles

  1. It is formed by the invagination of ependymal cells into the ventricles, which become richly vascularized (3). (Web site)

Dens

  1. Dens invaginatus, also called Dens in dente, is a deep invagination in a tooth causing the appearance of a tooth within a tooth. (Web site)

Hypha

  1. A thickened, electron-dense collar of material is deposited around the hypha at the point of invagination. (Web site)

Vesicle

  1. This invagination constitutes the choroidal fissure, and extends from the interventricular foramen to the posterior end of the vesicle. (Web site)

Orifice

  1. The orifice of the invagination remains open, and undergoes enlargement and modification to form the abdominal ostium of the fallopian tube. (Web site)

Embryo

  1. Continued cell movement results in an invagination of the bottom region of the embryo, producing a form that resembles a double-layered cup.

Endoderm

  1. The cells continue to be rearranged until the shallow dip formed by invagination transforms into a deeper, narrower pouch formed by the gastrula 's endoderm. (Web site)
  2. In Drosophila however, mesoderm is formed by ventral invagination while endoderm is formed by invagination from separate anterior and posterior primordia. (Web site)

Blastula

  1. The next step in development is the formation of the gastrula by invagination, the folding in of the cells of the blastula at a point called the blastopore. (Web site)

Archenteron

  1. Secondary invagination involves the elongation of the archenteron across the blastocoel, where it attaches near the animal pole of the embryo. (Web site)
  2. The vegetal plate undergoes primary invagination to produce the archenteron (primitive gut). (Web site)

Ectoderm

  1. The proctodeum (anal pit) is an invagination of surface (epidermal) ectoderm that develops in the hindgut and develops into the anus. (Web site)

Gastrulation

  1. Gastrulation begins with the invagination of cells in the region of the embryo once occupied by the middle of the gray crescent. (Web site)
  2. Archenteron is the tube formed during gastrulation by means of invagination of the blastula wall inside the blatocele. (Web site)

Invagination

  1. There are four kinds of tissue movements that drive gastrulation in Xenopus: invagination, involution, convergent extension and epiboly.
  2. Formation of the neural tube is the result of an invagination of the ectoderm following gastrulation.
  3. Neurulation in Xenopus involves neural fold elevation and invagination of the neural plate to form the neural tube. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Nature > Life > Animals > Gastrulation
  2. Archenteron
  3. Medicine > Anatomy > Tissues > Ectoderm
  4. Nature > Life > Animals > Blastula
  5. Four Kinds
  6. Books about "Invagination" in Amazon.com

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  Short phrases about "Invagination"
  Originally created: February 19, 2008.
  Links checked: May 13, 2013.
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