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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Biochemistry > Amino Acids > Essential Amino Acids > Valine > Leucine   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
N-ACYL LEUCINE
KCAL MOL-1
NORLEUCINE
GLUCOGENIC
CATABOLISM
ISOMERIC
NEGATIVE LEUCINE BALANCE
LEUCINE ABSORPTION
POSITIVE LEUCINE BALANCE
ISOMER
LEUCINE ENKEPHALIN
STRUCTURE
LEUCINE METABOLITE BETA-HYDROXY-BETA-METHYLBUTYRATE
LEUCINE ZIPPER MOTIF
DIETARY LEUCINE
UUG
HYDROPHOBIC
LEUCINE RESIDUE
FREE LEUCINE
KIC
LEUCINE ZIPPER
LEUCINE OXIDATION
LEUCINE AMINOPEPTIDASE
LEUCINE METABOLISM
LEUCINE SUPPLEMENTATION
MUSCLES
EXERCISE
DIET
GROWTH
STIMULATING
ENERGY
HEALING
EGGS
PATHWAY
DEGRADATION
PROCESS
INCORPORATION
BLOOD LEVELS
TURNOVER
IMPORTANT
HUMAN BODY
PEPTIDES
HIGHER
GRAMS
CELLS
MUTATED
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Leucine"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Leucine is the most common amino acid found in proteins, and is essential for optimal growth in infancy and childhood and for nitrogen equilibrium in adults. (Web site)
  2. Leucine is a member of the branched-chain amino acid family, along with valine and isoleucine.
  3. Leucine is an essential amino acid and one of the branched-chain amino acids (the others are isoleucine and valine).
  4. Leucine is the most effective BCAA for preventing muscle loss because it breaks down and is converted to glucose more quickly than isoleucine and valine. (Web site)
  5. Leucine is an essential amino acid, which cannot be manufactured in the body and is part of the three branched-chain-amino-acids. (Web site)

N-Acyl Leucine

  1. N-acyl ornithine was located in the cell membrane and N-acyl leucine and isoleucine in cytoplasm.

Kcal Mol-1

  1. The similarly sized amino acid isoleucine is 2.9 kcal mol-1 per residue less stabilizing than leucine, suggesting that leucine is well-packed.

Norleucine

  1. Synthetic amino acids include ornithine for lysine, fluorophenylalanine for phenylalanine, and norleucine for leucine or isoleucine. (Web site)

Glucogenic

  1. Leucine is completely ketogenic, valine is completely glucogenic, and isoleucine is both glucogenic and ketogenic. (Web site)
  2. All amino acids except lysine and leucine are at least partly glucogenic. (Web site)

Catabolism

  1. Not surprisingly, this results in a corresponding loss of leucine through catabolism (Boirie et al., 1997).

Isomeric

  1. An essential amino acid, C 6 H 13 NO 2, that is isomeric with leucine. (Web site)

Negative Leucine Balance

  1. Conversely, a negative leucine balance indicates conditions favoring protein catabolism.
  2. I n fact, whey actually produced a negative leucine balance.

Leucine Absorption

  1. On the other hand, leucine absorption was increased in the tumor bearing groups.
  2. In contrast, leucine absorption was not increased in the N group.

Positive Leucine Balance

  1. A positive leucine balance indicates a state (i.e., increased availability of leucine inside your muscle cells) that supports protein anabolism.

Isomer

  1. Isoleucine is an isomer of leucine, and it contains two chiral carbon atoms.

Leucine Enkephalin

  1. The interaction of methionine and leucine enkephalin with phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylcholine was studied by optical spectroscopy techniques. (Web site)

Structure

  1. The structure of leucine was established by laboratory synthesis in 1891.

Leucine Metabolite Beta-Hydroxy-Beta-Methylbutyrate

  1. Nutritional supplementation of the leucine metabolite beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (hmb) during resistance training.

Leucine Zipper Motif

  1. The protein contains a leucine zipper motif and has high homology to predicted proteins from S. cerevisiae and C. elegans. (Web site)

Dietary Leucine

  1. Fig. 8. Rate of 1- 13 C-leucine incorporation into whole body proteins in young men receiving various intakes of dietary leucine. (Web site)

Uug

  1. Alternative start codons (depending on the organism), include "GUG" or "UUG", which normally code for valine or leucine, respectively. (Web site)

Hydrophobic

  1. Like isoleucine, leucine and valine, these are hydrophobic and tend to orient towards the interior of the folded protein molecule.
  2. A nonpolar or hydrophobic R group can be a hydro-carbon chain, as in leucine. (Web site)

Leucine Residue

  1. Specifically, each group of serine residues is either preceded or followed by a leucine residue. (Web site)
  2. This leucine residue is universally conserved in GATA factors, and the conservative L683V change alters the binding affinity of the protein (17, 26). (Web site)
  3. The upper case bold L represents a leucine residue from the genomic clone which corresponds to an isoleucine in P. carinii cd2 cDNA. (Web site)

Free Leucine

  1. In each instance, the alanyl-leucine dipeptide was found to exhibit less bitterness than free leucine. (Web site)

Kic

  1. So we've covered the ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) component of Muscletech Leukic, let's take a quick look at the amino acid Leucine. (Web site)

Leucine Zipper

  1. Leucine Zipper: The leucine zipper domain is necessary for protein dimerization.
  2. The d position contains the conserved leucines found in the leucine zipper. (Web site)

Leucine Oxidation

  1. We estimated a breakpoint for the relations between methionine intake and leucine oxidation and balance. (Web site)
  2. The 24-h pattern and rate of leucine oxidation, with particular reference to tracer estimates of leucine requirements in healthy adults. (Web site)

Leucine Aminopeptidase

  1. Examples are leucine aminopeptidase, casepsin B, penicillin G acylase, and angiotensin converting enzyme.
  2. The element was used to determine leucine aminopeptidase in the following manner. (Web site)
  3. Urine has also recently been tested to yieldinformation about leucine aminopeptidase. (Web site)

Leucine Metabolism

  1. Body cell mass and leucine metabolism in cirrhosis. (Web site)

Leucine Supplementation

  1. Thus, it has been suggested that HMB may partly be responsible for the benefits of leucine supplementation. (Web site)
  2. They concluded that leucine supplementation during feeding improves muscle protein synthesis in the elderly subjects. (Web site)

Muscles

  1. Leucine helps in toning the body and the muscles. (Web site)

Exercise

  1. Leucine regulates translation initiation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle after exercise. (Web site)
  2. Leucine supplementation enhances skeletal muscle recovery in rats following exercise.

Diet

  1. Treatment The disorder is treated by a diet with moderate restriction of the amino acid leucine and supplementation of L-carnitine.
  2. On the other hand, in pregnant groups which received the leucine supplemented diet the absorption rate was 1.5 fold higher than non-pregnant group.

Growth

  1. A high amount of dietary leucine in the long-term depresses food intake and growth in various animals [10].

Stimulating

  1. Similarly, leucine and a complete meal were equally as effective at stimulating protein synthesis in fasted rats [11].

Energy

  1. Leucine works with the amino acids isoleucine and valine to repair muscles, regulate blood sugar, and provide the body with energy. (Web site)

Healing

  1. Leucine also promotes the healing of bones, skin, and muscle tissue after traumatic injury, and is often recommended for those recovering from surgery. (Web site)

Eggs

  1. Eggs, pork, beef, chicken, pulses, soy beans, and leafy vegetables are good sources of leucine.
  2. Our range includes leucine, lysine, tryptophan and valine, their best sources are meat, fish, fowl, eggs and dairy products.

Pathway

  1. The initial part of the pathway also leads to leucine. (Web site)

Degradation

  1. Leucine infusion appears to decrease protein degradation in humans (Nair et al., 1992). (Web site)

Process

  1. The very low levels in CFS patients of a by-product of protein degradation (leucine) that regulates this process suggests an ongoing proteolytic process.

Incorporation

  1. Four-hundred-fifty microliters of PRS were removed to measure the incorporation of [ 3 H]leucine into completed protein. (Web site)

Blood Levels

  1. People with depression, liver or kidney disease should avoid taking large amounts of leucine due to the changes of blood levels.

Turnover

  1. OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to measure the effect of chronic alcohol intake on leucine turnover in outpatients with stable alcoholic liver cirrhosis.
  2. Basal rates of methionine and leucine turnover are summarized in Table 3 and Figure 2. (Web site)

Important

  1. Although it is clear that leucine is the most important of the BCAA's in stimulating protein synthesis, leucine supplementation alone is not recommended.
  2. While some data suggests that all three BCAAs are important for protein synthesis, leucine is the BCAA that has been the most well studied. (Web site)
  3. These additional nutritional insights of leucine may have important applications in weight management and also in prevention and management of diabetes.

Human Body

  1. HMB is a byproduct of leucine metabolism in the human body. (Web site)

Peptides

  1. Sequence analysis revealed that the third amino acid, a leucine in a majority of E peptides, was the most conserved (33).

Higher

  1. However, rates of leucine oxidation were much higher in the high protein group [32].

Grams

  1. For improved effect, administration of at least 3 grams of leucine per day, for example, may be preferred. (Web site)
  2. In other words, a 5-gram dose should contain about 2.5 grams of leucine and 1.25 grams each of isoleucine and valine.

Cells

  1. I. General properties of the system and permeability of the cells for leucine and methionine. (Web site)

Mutated

  1. The equivalent residue to Asp-62 in Gal3p is Asp-56, and this was mutated to alanine and leucine. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Biochemistry > Amino Acids > Essential Amino Acids > Valine
  2. Biochemistry > Amino Acids > Essential Amino Acids > Isoleucine
  3. Tryptophan
  4. Chemistry > Biochemistry > Amino Acids > Essential Amino Acids
  5. Phenylalanine

Related Keywords

    * Alanine * Alanines * Amino * Amino Acids * Arginine * Athletes * Balance * Bcaa * Bcaas * Biotin * Blood * Blood Sugar * Body * Bodybuilders * Branched-Chain Amino * Branched-Chain Amino Acids * Branched Chain Amino * Branched Chain Amino Acids * Breakdown * Coconuts * Common Amino Acids * Cysteine * Daily Dosage * Elevated Blood Sugar Levels * Enzymes * Essential * Essential Amino * Essential Amino Acids * Glucose * Glucose Homeostasis * Glutamate * Glutamic * Glutamine * Glycine * Histidine * Hmb * Humans * Human Metabolism * Hydrophobic Amino * Hydrophobic Amino Acids * Infants * Isoleucine * Isomers * Kinetics * L-Alanine * Leu * Lysine * Maple Syrup Urine Disease * Metabolism * Metabolite * Methionine * Mitochondria * Muscle * Muscle Growth * Muscle Metabolism * Muscle Proteins * Nitrogen Balance * Optimal Growth * Oral Administration * Particular Amino * Phenylalanine * Plasma * Proline * Proteins * Pyruvate * Regulation * Repair * Residues * Role * Serine * Skeletal Muscle * Skeletal Muscle Cells * Synthesis * Threonine * Tissues * Tryptophan * Tyrosine * Valine * Vivo * Whey * Whole Body
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  Short phrases about "Leucine"
  Originally created: February 05, 2007.
  Links checked: June 16, 2013.
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