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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Motets > Madrigals   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
WORD PAINTING
NUMEROUS MADRIGALS
POLYPHONIC MADRIGALS
AMARILLI
CANZONETTE
FIFTH BOOK
MONODIC STYLE
FORTIETH BIRTHDAY
CLAUDIO MONTEVERDI
SOLO MADRIGALS
ITALIAN MADRIGALS
SINGERS
TECHNIQUE
RECORDING
LOVE
PARTS
VOLUME
ENGLAND
FORM
TEXT
ADDITION
TENURE
HARMONIC
COMPOSITIONS
STYLES
STYLE
SETTINGS
WRITTEN
SONNETS
FIRST
FIRST SET
SHOWS
ITALY
OPERA
VENICE
OPERAS
ARIAS
FIVE BOOKS
PUBLICATION
FIRST BOOK
POEMS
FIRST COLLECTION
NUMBER
FOURTH BOOK
EARLIEST WORKS
LEADING COMPOSERS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Madrigals"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Madrigals were developed in Italy by members of the Flemish school and later by native composers, including Giovanni Gabrieli. (Web site)
  2. Madrigals are listed alphabetically by book. (Web site)
  3. Some madrigals are very virtuosic, in particular those which contain passages for the three upper voices.
  4. These madrigals were composed when they were the high of expression of music to words. (Web site)
  5. His madrigals were craftsmanlike rather than profound or experimental. (Web site)

Word Painting

  1. This is the basic idea of word painting used in madrigals throughout the century.

Numerous Madrigals

  1. Other music by Gagliano includes secular monodies and numerous madrigals. (Web site)

Polyphonic Madrigals

  1. Composer of solo songs and polyphonic madrigals and motets 4. (Web site)

Amarilli

  1. Among the most famous of his madrigals is "Amarilli, mia bella". (Web site)

Canzonette

  1. Madrigal collections: Canzonette a tre voci, libro primo (1584); seven books of madrigals (1587-1619); Madrigali guerrieri et amorosi. (Web site)

Fifth Book

  1. Monteverdi's side of his historic debate with Artusi was published in the foreword to his Fifth Book of Madrigals.

Monodic Style

  1. The songs are of two sorts: several are strophic arias, continuing the tradition of the 16th century genre and there are also madrigals in monodic style. (Web site)

Fortieth Birthday

  1. Until his fortieth birthday he mainly worked on madrigals, composing nine books of them in all. (Web site)

Claudio Monteverdi

  1. Until his fortieth birthday, Claudio Monteverdi mainly worked on madrigals, composing nine books of them in all. (Web site)

Solo Madrigals

  1. Solo madrigals in the monodic style began to go out of fashion shortly before 1620, to be replaced by the aria. (Web site)

Italian Madrigals

  1. Philippe Verdelot was the most important composer of Italian madrigals in the early 16th century and recognized as the greatest innovator of the genre.

Singers

  1. Instrumental performance of madrigals had already been widespread for much of the 16th century, either in arrangements or in performances mixed with singers. (Web site)

Technique

  1. He also used the technique of monody, as pioneered in northern Italy, for some of his solo madrigals.

Recording

  1. Her contributions as a conductor included a revival of the madrigals of Monteverdi, performing and recording them during the years between the wars. (Web site)
  2. Mozart's C-Minor Piano Concerto was interrupted after the first movement, and a recording of some madrigals by Gesualdo took its place. (Web site)

Love

  1. The eighth book of madrigals (1638), known as the Madrigali guerrieri, et amorosi (Madrigals of love and war), is a compendium of works written earlier. (Web site)

Parts

  1. The song was published in Gibbons' First Set of Madrigals and Motets of 5 parts (1612).

Volume

  1. To this severe critique Monteverde replied by a letter addressed "Agli studiosi lettori," which he prefixed to a later volume of madrigals. (Web site)

England

  1. He wrote music for the Church of England, madrigals, consort music and keyboard works.

Form

  1. Book VIII, published in 1638, includes the so-called Madrigals of Love and War which many consider to be the perfection of the form.

Text

  1. A frottola generally would consist of music set to stanzas of text, while madrigals were through-composed.
  2. The Third Book of Madrigals (1593) does not represent a big departure musically from the previous publications, except for the choice of text. (Web site)

Addition

  1. In addition, the booklet also offers info on each of the singers next to the texts with corresponding translations from the madrigals. (Web site)

Tenure

  1. During his tenure he wrote over 100 motets & madrigals, 2 of which will be heard in the programme. (Web site)

Harmonic

  1. Harmonic and melodic dissonances, chromaticism, changes of meter and rhythm are, as in the polyphonic madrigals, the principal compositional resources.

Compositions

  1. Compositions in monodic form might be called madrigals, motets, or even concertos (in the earlier sense of " concertato ", meaning "with instruments"). (Web site)

Styles

  1. The ninth book of madrigals, published posthumously in 1651, contains lighter pieces, probably composed throughout his lifetime and representing both styles.

Style

  1. Caccini's score reflects the style of the madrigals and airs found in his Le nuove musiche.
  2. The English madrigals were a cappella, predominantly light in style, and generally began as either copies or direct translations of Italian models.

Settings

  1. He wrote and published a considerable quantity of sacred music, in addition to secular songs, Italian madrigals and settings of French and German texts. (Web site)

Written

  1. Many of his madrigals are lost, but another surviving set, from 1565, was written in collaboration with Alessandro Striggio.
  2. Usually written for three to six voices, madrigals came to be sung widely as a social activity by cultivated amateurs, male and female. (Web site)

Sonnets

  1. The genres of his compositions included hundreds of madrigals (approximately 400) as well as villanellas, pastorals, and sonnets. (Web site)

First

  1. Madrigals continued to be written for the first few decades of the 17th century. (Web site)

First Set

  1. He dedicated a First Set of madrigals, 'from my mansion in the monastery of Chester', to Sir Thomas Smith of Hough; his second to Sir Peter Legh of Lyme. (Web site)

Shows

  1. In 1592 he published his Third Book of Madrigals, which shows the traces of the new climate at the Mantuan court. (Web site)

Italy

  1. Many thousands of madrigals were written in Italy in the 1550s; the entire repertoire is yet to be studied exhaustively. (Web site)

Opera

  1. This ideal permeated his madrigals and found new expression in the dramatic language of opera.
  2. He specialized in opera, madrigals, and motets. (Web site)

Venice

  1. While in Venice, Monteverdi also finished his sixth, seventh and eighth books of madrigals. (Web site)
  2. In 1613, St. Marks in Venice made Monteverdi the maestro da cappela. Monterverdi wrote elaborate madrigals during his tenure.

Operas

  1. Monteverdi's works are split into three categories: madrigals, operas, and church-music.
  2. Stradella also wrote operas, motets, madrigals, and string concertos.
  3. Peri later wrote other operas, some in collaboration, ballets, madrigals, etc., only a few of which survive.

Arias

  1. Caccini's Le nuove musice (1602) Collection of songs (arias) in monody and solo madrigals The introduction describes ornaments and their use. (Web site)

Five Books

  1. His reputation then rested on five books of madrigals (so far) and two recent forays into the new world of all-sung drama – Orfeo and Arianna.

Publication

  1. His first music was written for publication, including some motets and sacred madrigals, in 1582 and 1583.
  2. Internationally famous through the publication of his madrigals, Monteverdi scaled new artistic heights with the composition of his operas.

First Book

  1. The first book of madrigals labeled as such was the Madrigali de diversi musici: libro primo de la Serena of Philippe Verdelot, published in 1530 in Rome.
  2. While still in Cremona, he published his first book of madrigals in 1587 and a second on 1 January 1590. (Web site)
  3. While in Ferrara, he published his first book of madrigals. (Web site)

Poems

  1. Giovanni wrote poems for many of the madrigals which were set for the ensemble, and choreographed scenes for the balletto delle donne.
  2. However, some of the same poems were used for both frottola and madrigals. (Web site)
  3. Monteverdi set the poems as five-part madrigals, and the ARTEK singers sang, in both solo and ensemble passages, with passionate intensity.

First Collection

  1. Particularly popular was the first collection of madrigals by Jacques Arcadelt. (Web site)

Number

  1. Although Giovanni shunned the lighter secular forms of villanella and canzonetta, his madrigals were included in a number of anthologies. (Web site)

Fourth Book

  1. There is a ten-year break before Monteverdi's next publication, the Fourth Book of Madrigals (1603). (Web site)
  2. This approach may also be found in several of Monteverdi's early madrigals, including 'Sfogava con le stelle' from his Fourth Book. (Web site)

Earliest Works

  1. His earliest works were incidental music for plays, intermedi and madrigals. (Web site)

Leading Composers

  1. Of the other leading composers of the time Orlando Gibbons published only one First Set of Madrigals and Motets of 5 parts in 1612. (Web site)
  2. One of the leading composers of madrigals was Claudio Monteverdi. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Motets
  2. Monteverdi
  3. Sacred Music
  4. First Book
  5. Voices

Related Keywords

    * Age * Andrea Gabrieli * Book * Books * Cantatas * Collection * Collections * Composer * Composers * Composing * Continuo * Father * Last Book * Life * Mantua * Marenzio * Masses * Monteverdi * Morley * Motets * Music * Nine Books * Published * Sacred Music * Secular * Secular Music * Series * Songs * Time * Vocal Music * Voices * Wert * Work * Works
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  Short phrases about "Madrigals"
  Originally created: August 01, 2010.
  Links checked: May 18, 2013.
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