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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Science > Astronomy > Universe > Galaxy > Massive   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
MASSIVE FORM
MASSIVE COLLECTION
SUPERNOVA
MASSIVE EXPLOSION
KING LEONIDAS
MASSIVE ARMY
MASSIVE DESTRUCTION
MOUNT PINATUBO
MASSIVE ERUPTION
MASSIVE BLOOD
MASSIVE STROKE
VIRGO CLUSTER
MASSIVE GALAXIES
MASSIVE BODIES
MASSIVE BODY
MASSIVE HIT
WEAKLY INTERACTING MASSIVE PARTICLES
MASSIVE SCALE
NEVERMIND
MASSIVE SUCCESS
MASSIVE ATTACK
MONEY
CONSTRUCTION
THICK
DENSE
CLOSER
MILKY WAY
CENTER
OCCURRING
COMPACT
JEWS
LIVES
SPIRAL GALAXY
MAGNITUDE
SHOCK
ALPHA PARTICLES
RADIATION
JUPITER
MOON
CORES
CORE
HYDROGEN
ELECTRONS
LIGHT
DIAMETER
UNIVERSE
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Massive"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. MASSIVE, the software used in The Lord of the Rings films.

Massive Form

  1. It is a sulfide of copper and iron, CuFeS 2. It crystallizes in the tetragonal system but is usually found in the massive form. (Web site)

Massive Collection

  1. What they've learned may confirm a theory for the mystery surrounding the heart of this massive collection of stars, gas and dust. (Web site)

Supernova

  1. Supernova: An extremely violent explosion of a star many times more massive than our Sun. (Web site)
  2. The heavier elements (like iron, copper and gold) are created as massive stars undergo supernova. (Web site)
  3. The most massive stars may be completely destroyed by a supernova with an energy greatly exceeding its gravitational binding energy. (Web site)

Massive Explosion

  1. Specificially, there's eta Carinae, which is the most luminous star in our galaxy and is just one massive explosion away from becoming a supernova.
  2. A high-mass star loses a large fraction of its mass quickly in a massive explosion known as a supernova.
  3. Many of the smaller moons of those worlds are detritus left over from the massive explosion that blew Bellona to smithereens some 900,000 years ago. (Web site)

King Leonidas

  1. In 480 BC a small Spartan unit under King Leonidas made a legendary last stand against a massive, invading Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae. (Web site)

Massive Army

  1. A small force led by King Leonidas of Sparta blocked the only road through which the massive army of Xerxes I could pass. (Web site)
  2. In 1605 the Swedes again spent large sums of money to conscript a new massive army.

Massive Destruction

  1. The 1800 eruption probably rivalled the 1980 eruption in size, although it did not result in massive destruction of the cone.
  2. During the Second World War, it was realized that the energy released by radioactivity could possibly be used to wreak massive destruction.
  3. Both wars saw massive destruction of the British merchant fleet but new construction exceeded the rate of destruction.

Mount Pinatubo

  1. In June 1991 the unexpected eruption of Mount Pinatubo in central Luzon killed hundreds of people and caused massive, widespread damage.

Massive Eruption

  1. The massive eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines during June 1991 came after more than 600 years of dormancy. (Web site)

Massive Blood

  1. The complete loss of blood is referred to as exsanguination, and desanguination is a massive blood loss. (Web site)
  2. The etiology of shock in traumatized patients is likely to be massive blood loss but other causes of shock must be considered.

Massive Stroke

  1. He immediately fled Sant' Agata for the Grand Hotel in Milan and, after four unhappy years, Verdi died in 1901, the victim of a massive stroke.
  2. Success and money only added to Frizzell's alcohol addiction, and on July 19, 1975 at age 47 he died after a massive stroke. (Web site)

Virgo Cluster

  1. Furthermore, the Virgo Cluster is so massive that it is attracting our own galaxy toward it, and itself to us. (Web site)
  2. The Virgo Cluster is so massive that it is noticeably pulling our Galaxy toward it. (Web site)

Massive Galaxies

  1. M87 is one of the most massive galaxies in the Virgo cluster and of all known galaxies. (Web site)
  2. BCGs include the most massive galaxies in the universe. (Web site)
  3. These galaxies were located in the Leo Ring, a cloud of hydrogen and helium around two massive galaxies in the constellation Leo.

Massive Bodies

  1. Near massive bodies, such as the Sun and Earth, this Aether fabric is stretched inward toward the mass. (Web site)
  2. Points in the vicinity of two massive bodies (such as the Earth and the Moon) where each others' respective gravities balance.
  3. In Newton's universe, gravity was regarded as an attractive force, which all massive bodies exert on each other. (Web site)

Massive Body

  1. The path that an object takes in a closed-circuit orbit around a more massive body (such as a satellite around the Earth) is in the shape of an ellipse. (Web site)
  2. A star is a massive body of plasma in outer space that is currently producing or has produced energy through nuclear fusion. (Web site)
  3. Answer is yes, because there is very massive body with very high intensity gravity in the universe. (Web site)

Massive Hit

  1. In 1950, Frizzell's Columbia recording "If You've Got the Money, I've Got the Time" became a massive hit, claiming a chart position for some 20 weeks. (Web site)

Weakly Interacting Massive Particles

  1. No such particles have yet been detected, though astronomers have given them names like Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs).
  2. If the dark matter within our galaxy is made up of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), then a large number must pass through the Earth each second. (Web site)
  3. Searches for dark matter in the form of elementary particles such as WIMPs (weakly interacting massive particles) have been developed by Blas Cabrera.

Massive Scale

  1. The tidal forces of nearby galaxies in the cluster may also play a role in triggering star formation on such a massive scale.
  2. Pictures from Mars show that the yardang ridges occur on a massive scale there, giving visual support to the theory that Mars has once had ground water.
  3. In more recent times, pyrolysis has been used on a massive scale to turn coal into coke for metallurgy, especially steel-making. (Web site)

Nevermind

  1. Nevermind was a massive, unexpected success, selling millions of copies. (Web site)

Massive Success

  1. Upon its release, Nevermind exceeded all expectations and became a massive success, catapulting the band to worldwide stardom.
  2. After the massive success of The Jazz Singer, Warner Brothers quickly turned around and created another vehicle to showcase their star.

Massive Attack

  1. Massive Attack released their second album entitled "Protection." Those years also marked the rise of Portishead and Tricky. (Web site)
  2. This trip-hop, drum & bass group layer warm textures over heavy beats that are reminiscent at times of Lamb, Nightmares on Wax, or Massive Attack.

Money

  1. The allure of Network Marketing or MLM to consumers is the massive amounts of money that some in the industry claim to make.
  2. HONG Kong action hero Jackie Chan says he wants to make a film about the massive earthquake which hit China earlier this month to raise money for victims.
  3. The much touted 'X-Com: Alliance' was canned by Microprose, despite a massive amount of money being lavished on it. (Web site)

Construction

  1. Groves immediately ordered the construction of two massive, full-scale uranium-enrichment plants. (Web site)
  2. Mughal Emperor Shahjahan started construction of the massive fort in 1638 and work was completed in 1648. (Web site)
  3. This resulted in the construction of fortress works across Europe such as the massive fortifications at Verdun.

Thick

  1. In most parts of Europe, Romanesque columns were massive, as they supported thick upper walls with small windows, and sometimes heavy vaults. (Web site)
  2. The marsupial lion weighed in at 100-200kg, and had a massive head and a thick, muscular tail.

Dense

  1. Giant stars are often no more massive than the Sun but they have expanded to great size and are therefore less dense but highly luminous. (Web site)
  2. The planets formed in the colder regions are more massive and less dense. (Web site)
  3. Serpentinite - A dark green, dense, tough, massive, hard rack.

Closer

  1. The closer the encounter and more massive the planet, the greater the energy exchange. (Web site)
  2. In 104 BC, Emperor Wu built the luxurious Jianzhang Palace (建章宮) — a massive structure that was intended to make him closer to the gods. (Web site)

Milky Way

  1. Andromeda, also known as Messier Object 31 or M31, is about 200 thousand light-years across and about 1.5 times more massive than the Milky Way.
  2. The Andromeda galaxy is the most massive in the local group of galaxies that includes our Milky Way. (Web site)
  3. Recent evidence indicates that Omega Centauri is by far the most massive of the about 150 known globular clusters in the Milky Way.

Center

  1. At the center of spiral galaxy M81 is a supermassive black hole about 70 million times more massive than our sun.
  2. Many scientists now believe that a black hole, the remains of a massive star, lies at the center of many galaxies. (Web site)
  3. M33 is unusual among spiral galaxies in that it does not seem to have a massive black hole at the center. (Web site)

Occurring

  1. Lanarkite (n.) A mineral consisting of sulphate of lead, occurring either massive or in long slender prisms, of a greenish white or gray color. (Web site)

Compact

  1. A mineral may show good crystal habit or form, or it may be massive, granular or compact with only microscopically visible crystals. (Web site)
  2. Typically found as massive, earthy, porous to compact, powdery aggregates and encrustations of very small to microscopic crystals.
  3. Commonly fibrous, compact, massive. (Web site)

Jews

  1. Finally, the machinery of the state was used to kill massive numbers of Jews and others in extermination camps.
  2. Massive deportations (or Aktions) had been held in the ghetto from July to September 1942, emptying the ghetto of the majority of Jews imprisoned there.
  3. There were Nazi -inspired pogroms in Algeria in the 1930s, and massive attacks on the Jews in Iraq and Libya in the 1940s (see Farhud).

Lives

  1. More massive stars become supergiants and end their lives, after exploding in a supernova, as either a neutron star or a black hole. (Web site)
  2. If successful, such a blood substitute could save many lives, particularly in trauma where massive blood loss results. (Web site)
  3. Another important use of the neutrino is in the observation of supernovae, the explosions that end the lives of highly massive stars. (Web site)

Spiral Galaxy

  1. It is a spiral galaxy like the Milky Way but is 4 times as massive and is 2 million light years away. (Web site)
  2. The Milky Way is a spiral galaxy, with the youngest and most massive stars collected in arms that curl around the galactic center.
  3. The central bulge of spiral galaxy contains older, redder stars and often also contains a invisible, massive black hole.

Magnitude

  1. That would make the electron seventeen orders of magnitude more massive than it is, and similarly for lots of other particles that we know and love. (Web site)
  2. In this case, '-27' is larger than '-31' and therefore the proton is four orders of magnitude more massive than the election.
  3. CHICAGO (ELCA) -- A massive earthquake, with a magnitude of 8.8 on the Richter scale, struck central Chile in the early morning hours Feb.

Shock

  1. If the clots are massive, the patient may get into shock and become unconscious or may even die. (Web site)
  2. Patients can lose massive amounts of blood in a short time, causing extremely low blood pressure and shock. (Web site)
  3. There are no secrets, magic formulas or killer techniques that will "shock" your chest into massive growth. (Web site)

Alpha Particles

  1. From the magnitude of deflection, it was clear that alpha particles were much more massive than beta particles.

Radiation

  1. The pillar's convoluted outlines are shaped by the winds and radiation of Carina's young, hot, massive stars.
  2. Astronomers believe that it contains a massive black hole, a space with a gravitational field so intense that no matter or radiation can escape. (Web site)
  3. Radiation from the massive star at the center of the nebula is making the gas in the jet glow, just as it causes the rest of the nebula to glow.

Jupiter

  1. In the case of the `gas giant' planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, the rocky cores were massive enough to also attract some of the gas. (Web site)
  2. Jupiter is more than twice as massive as all the other planets combined (the mass of Jupiter is 318 times that of Earth).
  3. Jupiter is the most massive planet in our solar system, and it has a nearly circular orbit. (Web site)

Moon

  1. The sun is more massive than the moon, but the sun is farther from the earth. (Web site)
  2. In a rotating system, L 1 is a bit farther from the (less massive) Moon and closer to the (more massive) Earth than it would be in a non-rotating system. (Web site)
  3. The Moon is much less massive than the Sun, but it is also much closer. (Web site)

Cores

  1. Neutron stars are compact objects that are created in the cores of massive stars during supernova explosions.
  2. Massive stars undergo a violent death when the supply of nuclear fuel in their cores is exhausted, resulting in a catastrophic "core-collapse" supernova. (Web site)
  3. The transformation of metals into gold, something once dreamed of by alchemists, is a process commonly occurring in the cores of massive stars.

Core

  1. The findings support the "collapsar" model, in which the core of a star 15 times more massive than the sun collapses into a black hole. (Web site)
  2. The more massive the star, the greater its luminosity, and the more rapidly it expends the hydrogen fuel in its core.
  3. When the massive stars in the cluster are sped up by this process, it reduces the contraction at the core and limits core collapse.

Hydrogen

  1. The lightest nucleus, that of hydrogen, is 1,836 times more massive than an electron, while heavy nuclei are nearly 500,000 times more massive.
  2. Ultraviolet radiation from newly born, massive stars is ionising the gas in these clouds, causing the great regions of hydrogen to glow red. (Web site)
  3. Stars form from massive clouds of hydrogen gas. (Web site)

Electrons

  1. Since the alpha particles were positively charged, and 7000 times more massive than an electron, they would brush right by electrons unaffected.
  2. The atom consists of a small, massive, positively charged core (nucleus) surrounded by electrons (see Atom).
  3. Only upper limits to the masses of neutrinos are known, but tauons are more massive than muons, which in turn are more massive than electrons.

Light

  1. Gravitational Lens: A massive object which causes light to bend and focus. (Web site)
  2. General relativity predicts that the path of light is bent in a gravitational field; light passing a massive body is deflected towards that body. (Web site)
  3. A black hole is an object both so massive and so compact that not even light itself can escape its staggering gravity.

Diameter

  1. While our galaxy is considered to be massive at a diameter of about 100,000 light-years, M31 is some 220,000 light-years across. (Web site)
  2. Fomalhaut is located about 25 light years away from our sun, is estimated to be 2.3 times as massive as the sun and about 1.7 times the diameter. (Web site)
  3. The largest asteroid, Ceres, about 600 miles in diameter, is only about as massive as our hypothetical chunk of Earth above. (Web site)

Universe

  1. Earth is massive, but not as massive or as dense as a lot of objects in the universe.
  2. Because most stars in the universe are small red dwarfs that are less massive than the sun, this translates to about a trillion stars. (Web site)
  3. The clumpiness of the gas is determined by, among other things, the constituents of the universe, including dark matter, dark energy, and massive neutrinos. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Science > Astronomy > Universe > Galaxy
  2. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nature > Matter > Particles
  3. Science > Astronomy > Universe > Planets
  4. Astronomy > Universe > Galaxy > Star
  5. Galaxies > Milky Way Galaxy > Solar System > Sun

Related Keywords

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  Short phrases about "Massive"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Links checked: June 26, 2013.
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