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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Lux > Meade   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
BRADFORD MEADE
GENERAL GEORGE MEADE
MEADE LUX LEWIS
INSTRUMENTS
SEPTEMBER
DESIGN
CHANGE
ORDERS
ACTION
PRODUCERS
MORNING
BACK
WAR
TROOPS
ASSAULTS
MARYLAND
POINT
REYNOLDS
ABRAHAM LINCOLN
CUSTER
GRANT
CELESTRON
BATTLE
GENERAL
JULY
TELEGRAM
COMMAND
COMMANDER
ALEXIS
CORPS
MINNEAPOLIS
ROBERT
LEE
REINFORCEMENTS
CONFEDERATES
GEORGE
ARMY
MAJ
TELESCOPES
HOOKER
GEN
POTOMAC
GETTYSBURG
LEWIS
LUX
MEADE
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Meade"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Meade is a leading designer and manufacturer of optical products including telescopes and accessories for the beginning to serious amateur astronomer. (Web site)
  2. Meade was a competent and outwardly modest man, although correspondence with his wife throughout the war suggests he was disguising his ego and ambition. (Web site)
  3. Meade is a character in the alternate history novel Gettysburg, written by Newt Gingrich and William Forstchen. (Web site)
  4. Meade was surprised by the change of command order, having previously expressed his lack of interest in the army command. (Web site)
  5. Meade was criticized by President Lincoln and others for not aggressively pursuing the Confederates during their retreat. (Web site)

Bradford Meade

  1. Alexis decided to take him to the hospital, but on the way, the car crashed as the man she had hired to kill Bradford Meade had cut the brakes.

General George Meade

  1. Most people do not know that General George Meade defeated General Lee at that battle.
  2. Hooker resigned in 1863 during the early part of the Gettysburg campaign and was replaced by General George Meade soon after this setback.

Meade Lux Lewis

  1. Albert Ammons was one of the big three of late - '30s boogie - woogie along with Pete Johnson and Meade Lux Lewis. (Web site)
  2. In 1938, Ammons appeared at Carnegie Hall with Pete Johnson and Meade Lux Lewis, an event that really helped launch the boogie-woogie craze. (Web site)

Instruments

  1. Constantly looking for ways to update and improve its instruments, Meade compares its own products against its toughest competition.
  2. Instruments: 16" Meade LX200, observation dome 5m in diameter.

September

  1. With the announcement, in September, 1980, of the Model 2080, Meade Instruments began to grow rapidly. (Web site)

Design

  1. Meade engineers are constantly seeking ways to make our products even better, to reduce manufacturing costs, and to design new and exciting products. (Web site)

Change

  1. That fall, Lee and Meade met again in two minor campaigns that did little to change the strategic standoff. (Web site)

Orders

  1. The court's opinion found that Major General Ambrose Burnside had failed to obey the orders of the army commander, Major General George G. Meade.

Action

  1. For this action, Meade was promoted to major general of volunteers, to rank from November 29, 1862. (Web site)
  2. Although officials at Meade Instruments have expressed an interest in acquiring Celestron, the action has been blocked by the FTC several times. (Web site)

Producers

  1. Consumers must bear in mind that some producers have marketed white wine with added honey as mead, often spelling it "meade".

Morning

  1. President Abraham Lincoln sent a messenger to appoint Meade as his replacement in the early morning hours of June 28 1863.
  2. Renee had a night of sex with Daniel Meade who did not know that she was Wilhelmina's sister or that he was in Wilhelmina's apartment until the next morning.

Back

  1. Soon Meade Lux Lewis was back on records and after the 1938 concert he was able to work steadily, sometimes in duets or trios with Ammons and Johnson. (Web site)

War

  1. To sum up, General George Meade accomplished many things during his time at war. (Web site)

Troops

  1. Major General Daniel Sickles had moved his troops almost a mile out in front of the Union lines, and Meade was there to get him moved back. (Web site)
  2. Meade recovered from his wounds in a Philadelphia hospital, but early in September he left the facility to rejoin his troops in the field.

Assaults

  1. Having achieved almost no gains from four days of assaults, Meade ordered his army to dig in, starting the ten-month siege. (Web site)

Maryland

  1. On February 17, 1974, Robert Preston, a private in the Army, stole an Army helicopter from Fort Meade, Maryland, and flew it to the White House Complex. (Web site)
  2. Bases in the five countries are linked directly to the headquarters of the secretive US National Security Agency (NSA) headquarters at Fort Meade, Maryland.
  3. So the three full-time psychics still operating on a $500,000-a-year budget out of Fort Meade, Maryland, will soon close up shop. (Web site)

Point

  1. A monument to Meade by sculptor Henry Kirke Bush-Brown, on the Gettysburg Battlefield, located close to the point where Pickett's Charge was repulsed. (Web site)

Reynolds

  1. Meade, intending to make his stand at Pipe Creek in Maryland, sent ahead John F. Reynolds, commanding the left wing. (Web site)

Abraham Lincoln

  1. Abraham Lincoln and the Union government hoped Meade would attack Lee and destroy the weakened Army of Northern Virginia before it escaped Pennsylvania. (Web site)

Custer

  1. Gen. Alfred Pleasonton recommended to Meade the promotion of three of his staff officers -- Custer, Wesley Merritt and Elon Farnsworth -- to brigadiers.

Grant

  1. Grant made his headquarters with Meade for the remainder of the war, which caused Meade to chafe at the close supervision he received. (Web site)

Celestron

  1. Be sure to indicate whether you are measuring the field of view of a Celestron or a Meade telescope.
  2. This acquisition takes place among rumors that Celestron would be purchased by their main competitor, Meade Instruments. (Web site)

Battle

  1. Daniel E. Sickles and Daniel Butterfield accused Meade of planning to retreat from Gettysburg during the battle. (Web site)
  2. At the Battle of Glendale, one of the Seven Days Battles, Meade was severely wounded in the arm, back, and side. (Web site)
  3. This statue of General George Meade, who commanded the Union Army at the Battle of Gettysburg, is located in front of the U.S. Court House.

General

  1. Three days prior to the Battle of Gettysburg, General Meade promoted Custer from first lieutenant to brevet brigadier general (temporary rank) of volunteers.
  2. Under orders from General Meade, the VI Corps sent out a heavy skirmish line after 10 a.m. (Web site)
  3. After Spotsylvania, Grant requested that Meade be promoted to major general of the regular army. (Web site)

July

  1. On 1 July the report reached General Meade, who was fifteen miles distant, that there was fighting at Gettysburg, and that General Reynolds had been killed.
  2. Beginning on July 5, Meade ordered his exhausted army southward in pursuit of Lee's army, which was in retreat back to Virginia.

Telegram

  1. Halleck then relayed the contents of Lincoln's letter to Meade in a telegram. (Web site)
  2. In a telegram to Secretary of War Edwin Stanton on May 13, 1864, Grant stated that "Meade has more than met my most sanguine expectations. (Web site)

Command

  1. General George Meade (of NSA grounds fame) took over command of the Army of the Potomac.

Commander

  1. Ulysses S. Grant was appointed commander of all Union armies in March 1864, Meade offered to resign. (Web site)

Alexis

  1. The bandaged woman was played by Elizabeth Penn Payne, until she was revealed to be Alexis Meade, formerly Alex Meade, and Rebecca Romijn took over the role.
  2. In 2007, Gayheart guest-starred on Ugly Betty as Jordan, an ex-girlfriend of Alexis Meade.
  3. Most recently, the popular series "Ugly Betty" added to its cast actress Rebecca Romijn to play Alex "Alexis" Meade, a transwoman. (Web site)

Corps

  1. Third Corps was hard pressed and Meade sent V Corps and part of 11 Corps to reinforce Sickles in the Peach Orchard. (Web site)
  2. Command of his I Corps fell to General Meade, since Hooker's senior subordinate, James B. Ricketts, had also been wounded. (Web site)

Minneapolis

  1. Meade Lux Lewis continued recording until 1962, and died in an automobile accident in Minneapolis on June 7, 1964.

Robert

  1. Meade stands at the far right with Generals John Sedgwick and Robert O. Tyler, along with staff officers. (Web site)

Lee

  1. There, in dense woods that nullified the Union army's advantages in artillery, Robert E. Lee surprised Grant and Meade with aggressive assaults. (Web site)
  2. Most politicians, including Lincoln, criticized Meade for what they considered to be his tepid pursuit of Lee after the battle. (Web site)
  3. However, due to ineffectual pursuit by the commander of Union forces, Major General George Meade, Lee escaped again to Virginia.

Reinforcements

  1. As Longstreet's divisions slammed into the Union III Corps, Meade was forced to send 20,000 reinforcements[ 42] in the form of the entire V Corps, Brig. (Web site)
  2. Gen. Meade rushed as many as 20,000 reinforcements from elsewhere in his line to resist these fierce assaults. (Web site)
  3. Longstreet knocked holes in Sickles's line, but Meade rushed reinforcements to plug the gaps. (Web site)

Confederates

  1. The Confederates successfully stood their ground on July 4 and withdrew only after they realized Meade would not attack them. (Web site)
  2. Gen. George G. Meade, to attack defensive positions erected by the Confederates. (Web site)

George

  1. Lee faced a new and very dangerous opponent in George Meade, and the Army of the Potomac stood to the task and fought well on its home territory. (Web site)
  2. Gen. George Meade during Lee's second invasion of the North, in June. (Web site)
  3. Lincoln's search for an effective commander continued, and he eventually replaced Hooker with George Meade.

Army

  1. As a final factor, Lee faced a new and formidable opponent in George G. Meade, and the Army of the Potomac fought well on its home territory. (Web site)
  2. He chose to make his headquarters with the Army of the Potomac although Meade remained the actual commander of that army. (Web site)
  3. Much to Lincoln's dismay, however, Meade failed to exploit his advantage, and Lee's shattered army was eventually able to retreat into northern Virginia. (Web site)

Maj

  1. His coordinated strategy called for Grant and Meade to attack Lee from the north, while Maj. (Web site)
  2. During the three days, Meade made excellent use of capable subordinates, such as Maj. (Web site)

Telescopes

  1. Founded in 1972 and public since 1997, Meade is a world leader in the design and manufacture of telescopes and accessories for amateur astronomers.
  2. We carry all the popular brands of binoculars and telescopes including Celestron, Meade and Bushnell.
  3. Meade optics consistently outperform telescopes of similar and larger aperture.

Hooker

  1. Hooker received the Thanks of Congress for his role at the start of the Gettysburg Campaign,[ 12] but the glory would go to Meade. (Web site)
  2. However, Lee learned on this day that the Federal army was at Frederick, and that Hooker had been replaced by General Meade. (Web site)
  3. Five months after he wrote this letter and just before the pivotal battle of Gettysburg, Lincoln replaced Hooker with George Meade. (Web site)

Gen

  1. Gen. George G. Meade remained the actual commander of that army.
  2. Gen. George G. Meade arrived, prepared Smith's XVIII corps on the right, his own II Corps in the center, and Burnside's IX Corps on the left. (Web site)
  3. Gen. James H. Wilson was ordered by Meade to conduct a raid destroying as much track as possible south and southwest of Petersburg. (Web site)

Potomac

  1. Gen. George G. Meade, and the Army of the Potomac stood to the task and fought well on its home territory. (Web site)
  2. The Army of the Potomac, directed by Grant and Meade, would engage Lee in northern Virginia and move on Richmond. (Web site)
  3. Gen. George G. Meade, due to Hooker's defeat at the Battle of Chancellorsville and his timid response to Lee's second invasion north of the Potomac. (Web site)

Gettysburg

  1. He encountered Union forces under George G. Meade at the three-day Battle of Gettysburg in Pennsylvania on July 1-3, 1863.
  2. When Lee's troops began to withdraw from Gettysburg on July 4, Meade failed to heed Halleck's advice to pursue the Confederates aggressively. (Web site)
  3. Gen. George G. Meade, pursued Lee, defeated him at the Battle of Gettysburg, but allowed him to escape back to Virginia. (Web site)

Lewis

  1. Meade Lux Lewis (1905-1964) Lewis was one of the leading boogie-woogie pianists. (Web site)

Lux

  1. In 1973 he listened to authentic boogie-woogie piano for the first time on vintage shellacs by Albert Ammons, Meade "Lux" Lewis and Pete Johnson.

Meade

  1. Meade "Lux" Lewis continued recording until 1962 and died in an automobile accident in Minneapolis, Minnesota on June 7, 1964.
  2. Maj. Gen. Winfield S. Hancock assumed command of the battlefield, sent by Meade when he heard that Reynolds had been killed.
  3. Gen. Joseph Hooker moved his army in pursuit, but was relieved just three days before the battle and replaced by Meade. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Lux
  2. Gettysburg
  3. Potomac
  4. History > Wars > War > Gen
  5. Information > Science > Astronomy > Telescopes
  6. Books about "Meade" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Meade"
  Originally created: February 02, 2008.
  Links checked: January 07, 2013.
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