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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Subnet Mask > Network Id   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
MEANS
SYSTEMS
NETWORK BROADCAST
SEVERAL LOCAL NETWORKS
ORIGINAL CLASSFUL NETWORK ID
DEFAULT ROUTE NETWORK ID
EQUAL-SIZED SUBNETS
SUCCESSIVE SUBNETTED NETWORK ID
NHRP NETWORK ID
SUBNETTED
SUBNETTED NETWORK IDS
SUBNETTED NETWORK ID
CORRESPONDING
DEVICE
COMPUTER
PART
COMBINATION
VALID
POINT
ENTRY
RESULT
EXTRACT
LOGICAL
SET
PORTION
SUBNETWORK
NODES
HOSTS
VALUE
ROUTING TABLES
PACKETS
UNICAST
PUBLIC INTERNET
UNIQUE
BEST ROUTE
INTERNAL NETWORK
SOURCE ROUTING
INTERNET
LOCAL NETWORK
VARIABLE
SUBNET MASKS
HOSTID
NETWORK ADDRESS
SINGLE CLASS
THIRD OCTET
NETWORK NUMBER
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Network Id"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. The network id is the number assigned to a network in the internet. (Web site)
  2. The Network ID is the official designation for a particular subnet, and the ending number is the broadcast address that every device on a subnet listens to. (Web site)
  3. The IP network ID is the network address that is common for all network interfaces attached to the same logical network. (Web site)
  4. Your network ID is the first 30 bits, in bold below. (Web site)
  5. The NHRP network ID is used to help keep two NHRP networks (clouds) separate from each other when both are configured on the same router. (Web site)

Means

  1. The LINKLOCAL space is a "class B network", which means the network ID is the first two numbers.

Systems

  1. The network ID identifies the systems that are located on the same network or subnet. (Web site)

Network Broadcast

  1. The minus two is for the reserved addresses of network ID and network broadcast. (Web site)

Several Local Networks

  1. Subnet masks are also used to further segment an assigned network ID among several local networks. (Web site)

Original Classful Network Id

  1. Formed by setting all the original classful network ID host bits to 1 for a classless address prefix. (Web site)

Default Route Network Id

  1. The default route network ID is 0.0.0.0 with the subnet mask of 0.0.0.0. (Web site)

Equal-Sized Subnets

  1. For example, a 4-bit subnetting of a class B network ID produced 16 equal-sized subnets (using the all-ones and all-zeros subnets). (Web site)

Successive Subnetted Network Id

  1. DecimalAdd a calculated increment value to each successive subnetted network ID and convert to dotted decimal notation.

Nhrp Network Id

  1. We recommend that the same NHRP network ID be used on the GRE interfaces on all routers that are in the same NHRP network.

Subnetted

  1. Because this class B network ID represents an impractical broadcast domain, it is subnetted. (Web site)
  2. To determine the desired subnetting scheme, you will start with an existing network ID to be subnetted. (Web site)

Subnetted Network Ids

  1. The term network ID applies to class-based network IDs, subnetted network IDs, and classless network IDs. (Web site)

Subnetted Network Id

  1. Binary—Write down the first and last IP address for each subnetted network ID and convert to dotted decimal notation.
  2. With the new subnet mask, the subnetted network ID is clearly different from the original network ID. (Web site)

Corresponding

  1. Decimal—Add values incrementally, corresponding to the first and last IP addresses for each subnetted network ID and convert to dotted decimal notation.

Device

  1. Each IP address defines the network ID and host ID of the device. (Web site)

Computer

  1. It allows a computer to distinguish which parts in an IP address correspond to the network ID and host ID portions of the address.
  2. The portion of the IP address that identifies a computer within a particular network ID. See also IP address and network ID.

Part

  1. Subnet Mask A subnet mask determines which part of the IP address denotes the network id and which part is the host id. (Web site)
  2. Answer: Three of the third octet's bits are still part of the host ID. This means that the network ID for this address is 126.126.0.0. (Web site)

Combination

  1. The combination of IP network ID and IP host ID is an IP address. (Web site)
  2. The combination of the original network ID bits and the converted host bits becomes the new subnetted network ID. (Web site)

Valid

  1. You must create a scope on the DHCP server that is valid on the same network ID as the IP address provided in the giaddr field. (Web site)

Point

  1. Anytime you want to refer to a subnet, you point to its Network ID and its subnet mask, which defines its size. (Web site)

Entry

  1. For the binary representation for each entry in the table, the original network ID bits are fixed at their original values. (Web site)

Result

  1. Compare the result with the Network ID of the entry for a match. (Web site)

Extract

  1. To tell an IP node exactly how to extract a network ID, either class-based or subnetted, a subnet mask is used. (Web site)
  2. IP uses a method called a bit-wise logical AND to extract the network ID. (Web site)

Logical

  1. To extract the network ID from an arbitrary IP address using an arbitrary subnet mask, IP uses a mathematical operation called a logical AND comparison.
  2. The logical "AND" calculation reveals that the network ID for this network is 1.1.1.0. (Web site)

Set

  1. Therefore, because the bits in the network ID are copied and the bits in the host ID are set to 0, the result must be the network ID. (Web site)
  2. The bits of the subnet mask are defined as: All bits that correspond to the network ID are set to 1. (Web site)

Portion

  1. The bits in the network ID portion of the IP address are copied directly to the result. (Web site)
  2. Therefore, 12 bits are used for the host ID portion, and 20 bits for the network ID portion. (Web site)
  3. The network ID, by contrast, is the portion of the address that refers to the network itself. (Web site)

Subnetwork

  1. In order to create a subnetwork, we need to have a system for addressing that allows us to use the network ID and host ID within the class-based system. (Web site)

Nodes

  1. All the nodes that are within a common network use the same network ID within their full IP address.
  2. To give the IP nodes this new level of awareness, it must be told exactly how to discern the new subnetted network ID regardless of Internet Address Classes. (Web site)

Hosts

  1. This means that the network id will be 200.1.1 and the total number of hosts will be 254. (Web site)

Value

  1. A value of 0 in the network ID portion of the IP address becomes a 0 in the result. (Web site)

Routing Tables

  1. This gives it the network ID which it compares with its routing tables looking for a match. (Web site)

Packets

  1. A 32-bit value that allows the recipient of IP packets to distinguish the network ID portion of the IP address from the host ID. (Web site)

Unicast

  1. The unicast IP address is an internetwork address for IP nodes that contains a network ID and a host ID. (Web site)
  2. Figure 6-3 is an example of a unicast IP address and its network ID and host ID portions. (Web site)

Public Internet

  1. If you do not plan on connecting to the public Internet, the local network ID must be unique to your private internetwork. (Web site)

Unique

  1. Each data link on a network must have a unique network ID, with every node on that link being a member of the same network. (Web site)
  2. So in a particular type of network, each node has the same network id and a host id, which are unique. (Web site)
  3. The address for each host must be unique to the network ID. The use of the term network ID refers to any IP network ID. An IP address is 32 bits long. (Web site)

Best Route

  1. If multiple matching entries are found (for example, multiple routes to the same network ID), the router uses the lowest metric to select the best route. (Web site)

Internal Network

  1. The host ID must be unique on the internal network, that is, no two nodes on a given network can have the same network ID AND host ID. (Web site)
  2. In our current example, the addresses will be on the same network ID as the internal network, so we will enter the value 24 into the Length text box. (Web site)

Source Routing

  1. IPX IPX test Examines the network's IPX configuration, including Frame Type, Network ID, RouterMTU and whether packet burst or source routing are enabled.

Internet

  1. If you plan on having a direct routed connection to the public Internet, the network ID must be unique to the Internet. (Web site)
  2. The network ID part of the IP address is centrally administered by the Internet Network Information Centre (InterNIC) and is unique throughout the Internet. (Web site)
  3. For example, consider the class B network ID of 131.107.0.0 (shown in Figure 6-7), which is connected to the Internet. (Web site)

Local Network

  1. All 0s in the network ID are used to denote a specific host on the local network and will not be routed. (Web site)

Variable

  1. With variable length subnetting, the network ID being subnetted has already been subnetted. (Web site)

Subnet Masks

  1. The creation and deployment of various-sized subnets of a network ID is known as variable length subnetting and uses variable length subnet masks (VLSM).
  2. The table also shows how these subnet masks would partition an IP address such as w.x.y.z into a network ID and a host ID portion. (Web site)
  3. Subnet masks allows you to identify the network ID and the host (node) ID of an IP address. (Web site)

Hostid

  1. Every IP address can be broken down into 2 parts, the Network ID(netid) and the Host ID(hostid). (Web site)

Network Address

  1. The first address of a subnet block (all 0s) is called the network address or network ID. The last address (all 1s) is the broadcast address of the network.
  2. The network ID, or network address, identifies the nodes that are located on the same logical network. (Web site)

Single Class

  1. If a single class B network ID is assigned, that single class B network ID becomes a single route in the routing tables of the Internet backbone routers. (Web site)

Third Octet

  1. The third octet has 6 bits for the network ID and 2 bits for the host ID. All we have to do is convert 1111 1100 to decimal. (Web site)
  2. To express the third octet as part of the network ID, the custom subnet mask 255.255.255.0 is used. (Web site)

Network Number

  1. Also called a network number or network ID. Network address translation (NAT) translation RFC 1918 addresses to public domain addresses. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Subnet Mask
  2. Bits
  3. Network Mask
  4. Communication > Networks > Network > Subnetting
  5. Tech Tips > Address

Related Keywords

    * Address * Addresses * Address Classes * Assigning * Bits * Class * Class-Based * Dotted Decimal Notation * Ids * Internetwork * Limited Broadcast Address * Mask * Network * Networks * Network Ids * Network Mask * Number * Route * Router * Routers * Routes * Subnet * Subnets * Subnetting * Subnet Id * Subnet Mask
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  Short phrases about "Network Id"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Links checked: April 19, 2013.
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