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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Aes > Nist   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
MONTHS
EVALUATIONS
VOTING SYSTEMS
SKIPJACK
TRIPLE DES
SHA
SHA256
COMPUTER SECURITY DIVISION
CRYPTOGRAPHIC HASH ALGORITHM COMPETITION
CRYPTOGRAPHIC ALGORITHM STANDARDS
DRAFT FIPS
FIPS 46-3
CMAC
SUCCESSOR SYMMETRIC-KEY BLOCK CIPHER
ALTERNATIVE INITIAL VALUES
YEARS
WORKING
ORGANIZATIONS
PUBLIC
GUIDELINES
DEVELOPMENT
PROPOSED
INFORMATION
APPROPRIATE
AGENCIES
MODES
PARTIES
REPORT
LIST
CANDIDATES
ADDRESS
PROCESS
SUCCESSOR
GOVERNMENT
GOVERNMENT AGENCY
CRYPTOGRAPHIC ALGORITHMS
SECURITY
COMPUTER SECURITY
WORKSHOP
SUPPORT
REPLACEMENT
TEAM
STANDARD
ENCRYPTION ALGORITHM
ENCRYPTION ALGORITHMS
KEY SIZES
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Nist"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. NIST, an agency of the Commerce Department's Technology Administration, selected the formula after a four-year competition.
  2. NIST is seeking to establish a successor symmetric-key block cipher to DES by the year 2000.
  3. NIST is holding a competition to replace the SHA family of hash functions, which have been increasingly under attack.
  4. Developed by NIST, the AES algorithm is a complex cryptographic algorithm.

Months

  1. NSA briefed NIST on its work regarding the public-key encryption algorithms 7 months after NIST's first request for assistance in 1989.

Evaluations

  1. During the first phase, NIST will evaluate the algorithms, including using publically submitted evaluations, and select a shortlist.

Voting Systems

  1. NIST says that voting systems should not rely on a machine's software to provide a record of the votes cast.

Skipjack

  1. SkipJack was unclassified, and described in the web site of NIST.

Triple Des

  1. Currently, NIST has approved three symmetric encryption algorithms for use in Federal processing: AES, Triple DES, and Skipjack.

Sha

  1. These are issued by NIST. Among other things, DES and SHA are defined in FIPS documents.

Sha256

  1. According to NIST, they're SHA512, SHA384 and SHA256. Why PGP insists on renaming them is something I don't understand.

Computer Security Division

  1. FIPS 140 is one of many cryptographic standards maintained by the Computer Security division of NIST, the US National Institute for Standards and Technology.

Cryptographic Hash Algorithm Competition

  1. That said, NIST announced in 2007 their Cryptographic Hash Algorithm Competition to find the next-generation secure hashing method.

Cryptographic Algorithm Standards

  1. Yes. As is the case with its other cryptographic algorithm standards, NIST will continue to follow developments in the cryptanalysis of Rijndael.

Draft Fips

  1. NIST intends to publish a Draft FIPS for the AES approximately one to two months after the AES announcement.

Fips 46-3

  1. On 19 May 2005, FIPS 46-3 was officially withdrawn, but NIST has approved Triple DES through the year 2030 for sensitive government information.

Cmac

  1. Currently, NIST approves both the AES and TDES algorithms for use with CMAC.

Successor Symmetric-Key Block Cipher

  1. Literally "Advanced Encryption Standard." NIST is seeking to establish a successor symmetric-key block cipher to DES by 2001.

Alternative Initial Values

  1. According to [ RFC3394], NIST will define alternative initial values in future key management publications as needed.

Years

  1. No. The complete algorithm specification and design rationale have been available for review by NIST, NSA, and the general public for more than two years.

Working

  1. NIST and NSA are working together to perform evaluations of computer security products.

Organizations

  1. A variety of the recommendations already have been acted upon by federal agencies, and NIST has briefed organizations in the Gulf Coast Region.

Public

  1. NIST has invited the public to send comments, as part of its own review.

Guidelines

  1. Under the Computer Security Act of 1987, NIST also develops standards and guidelines for the protection of sensitive federal computer systems.

Development

  1. NIST has been working very closely with industry and the cryptographic community during the development of the Advanced Encryption Standard.
  2. NSA supports NIST in the development of standards that promote interoperability among security products.

Proposed

  1. In 2003 the U.S. National Institute for Standards and Technology, NIST, proposed that 80-bit keys should be phased out by 2015.

Information

  1. Under the Joint R&D Technology Exchange Program, NIST and NSA hold periodic technical exchanges to share information on new and ongoing programs.
  2. Information is available on the NIST Web site.

Appropriate

  1. This is not currently practical and NIST considers keying option 1 to be appropriate through 2030.

Agencies

  1. NIST and NSA are the responsible agencies.

Modes

  1. CMAC was submitted to NIST as part of an ongoing public effort to develop and update block cipher-based algorithms, called modes of operation.

Parties

  1. An informal AES discussion forum was also provided by NIST for interested parties to discuss the AES finalists and relevant AES issues.
  2. SPECIAL NOTE - Intellectual Property NIST reminds all interested parties that the adoption of AES is being conducted as an open standards-setting activity.

Report

  1. The NIST report embraces that critique, introducing the concept of "software independence" in voting systems.
  2. By the definition of science the NIST report is not scientific.
  3. Following the announcement, NIST intends to publish a Round 2 Report that will summarize information from Round 2 and explain the algorithm selection.

List

  1. NIST maintains a list of proposed modes for AES [ 11][ 12].
  2. It is the responsibility of the vendor to notify NIST of any necessary changes to its entry in the following list.

Candidates

  1. Note that this list does not include candidates in the current NIST hash function competition.
  2. At that conference and in a simultaneously published Federal Register notice, NIST solicited public comments on the candidates.
  3. All "candidates" (algorithms) were extensively examined by the world community and on October 2nd, 2000, NIST announced the winners.

Address

  1. Actions are being taken by NIST and other agencies to address each of these areas.
  2. The table below lists the time servers used by the NIST Internet Time Service (ITS). The table lists each server's name, IP address, and location.

Process

  1. On October 2, 2000, NIST announced that Rijndael had been selected as the proposed AES, and underwent the process of being made the official standard.

Successor

  1. NIST will evaluate the submitted algorithms and choose one or more to become the successor of SHA-2 by 2012.
  2. However, rather than simply publishing a successor, NIST asked for input from interested parties on how the successor should be chosen.

Government

  1. NIST carries out many of these efforts in partnership with industry and government.
  2. NIST establishes cryptographic algorithm standards for the US government.

Government Agency

  1. NIST: National Institute of Standards and Technology, the government agency charged with adopting a national cryptographic algorithm standard.

Cryptographic Algorithms

  1. NIST requested NSA's assistance in evaluating the few cryptographic algorithms received, and NSA reported that no suitable algorithms had been submitted.

Security

  1. NIST has mandated a block length of 128 bits for the Advanced Encryption Standard to improve security.
  2. NIST will consider alternatives which offer a higher level of security.
  3. After that, NIST recommends that they be upgraded to something providing more security.

Computer Security

  1. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) maintains these standards specifying, among other things, computer security.

Workshop

  1. NIST will consider for discussion at the workshop, at a minimum, the modes that were proposed at the October 20, 2000 public workshop on this topic.
  2. NIST held a workshop to discuss the proposed Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) today.

Support

  1. However neither any later paper or any actions by the NSA or NIST give any support to this remark by Courtois.
  2. According to FIPS 81, NIST does not support the use of the OFB mode for any amount of feedback less than 64 bits.

Replacement

  1. SHA256 is another hash function specified by NIST, intended as a replacement for SHA1, generating larger digests.

Team

  1. Designed by a team led by Bruce Schneier.  In 1997, NIST initiated a process to develop a new secure cryptosystem for U.S. government applications.

Standard

  1. CBC was originally specified by NIST in FIPS 81. The standard, issued in 1981, only offers confidentiality.
  2. This makes it even less likely that anyone will implement it, and very unlikely that NIST will make it a standard.

Encryption Algorithm

  1. NIST decided to orchestrate a worldwide competition for a new encryption algorithm.

Encryption Algorithms

  1. According to a NIST retrospective about DES, The DES can be said to have "jump started" the nonmilitary study and development of encryption algorithms.

Key Sizes

  1. NIST and other standards bodies will provide up to date guidance on suggested key sizes.
  2. After much criticism that this is not secure enough especially for long-term security, NIST revised DSS to allow key sizes up to 1024 bits.

Categories

  1. Aes
  2. National Institute
  3. Nsa
  4. Rijndael
  5. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Information > Reference > Standards

Related Keywords

    * Advanced Encryption Standard * Aes * Aes Algorithm * Aes Process * Algorithm * Algorithms * Block Cipher * Block Size * Comments * Complete Specification * Cryptography * Data * December 2001 * Des * Developed * Dsa * National Bureau * National Institute * November 2001 * Nsa * Published * Rijndael * Section * Secure Hash Algorithm * Standards * Submissions * Technology * Time * Vincent Rijmen * Work
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  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
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