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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Basalt > Ocean Floor   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
PILLOW BASALT
RESULTING SEDIMENTS FORM DEPOSITS
SEVERAL HUNDRED KILOMETERS WIDE
OLD OCEAN FLOOR
GALAPAGOS SPROUTED
NORTH AMERICA
ISLAND
BASALT MAKES
MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE
MANGANESE NODULES
GLOBULAR ANIMAL
CONTINENTAL SHELF
SURROUNDING OCEAN FLOOR
ATLANTIC OCEAN FLOOR
PACIFIC OCEAN FLOOR
HYDROGEN SULFIDE
BASALTIC
VOLCANIC
THEORY
ANOMALIES
BLUE WHALES
HALIBUT
NORTH
HOOK
PART
MOUNTAINS
MAP
MAPPING
SURFACE
BOTTOM
METHANE
TSUNAMI
EARTHQUAKE
CRUSTACEANS
FEED
WEGENER
GEOLOGISTS
CORALS
SPONGES
WATER
RIFT
UPWARD
HAWAIIAN ISLANDS
FORM
LIMESTONE
SURVEYS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Ocean Floor"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. The ocean floor is home to many unique communities of plants and animals. (Web site)
  2. The ocean floor is being continuously pulled apart along these midocean ridges. (Web site)
  3. The ocean floor is the most widespread surface feature of Earth. (Web site)
  4. The ocean floor was distant from the continental source of the sediment.
  5. New ocean floor is being created offshore of Washington and Oregon.

Pillow Basalt

  1. Some of the magma erupts on the ocean floor and builds up piles of pillow basalt.

Resulting Sediments Form Deposits

  1. Resulting sediments form deposits on the ocean floor, they are slowly covered and sink deeper, where they turn into magma and their cycle starts again. (Web site)

Several Hundred Kilometers Wide

  1. It is several hundred kilometers wide, and its elevation above the ocean floor is 600 m or more. (Web site)

Old Ocean Floor

  1. The rocks to the east are derived from the old margins of the two continents together with the old ocean floor. (Web site)

Galapagos Sprouted

  1. The Galapagos sprouted out of the Pacific from a sub oceanic lava vent on the ocean floor.

North America

  1. From Europe, to North America, the ocean floor is covered with a large sheet of lava.

Island

  1. The island of Rarotonga stands over 14,750 feet (4,500 meters) above the ocean floor. (Web site)

Basalt Makes

  1. Basalt makes up most of the ocean floor and is the most abundant volcanic rock in the Earth's crust. (Web site)

Mid-Atlantic Ridge

  1. Transverse ridges running between the continents and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge divide the ocean floor into numerous basins. (Web site)

Manganese Nodules

  1. Vast quantities of manganese exist in manganese nodules on the ocean floor. (Web site)

Globular Animal

  1. A spiny, globular animal that lives on the ocean floor off the western coast of North America. (Web site)
  2. A spiny, globular animal that lives on the ocean floor. (Web site)

Continental Shelf

  1. Pilot and dwarf sperm whales are both deep-diving animals that feed off the ocean floor and slopes of the continental shelf. (Web site)

Surrounding Ocean Floor

  1. The island of Rakata itself largely ceased to exist, and its surrounding ocean floor was drastically altered.
  2. As a result of the huge amount of material deposited by the volcano, the surrounding ocean floor was drastically altered. (Web site)

Atlantic Ocean Floor

  1. A fracture zone (fault) has been discovered in the Atlantic Ocean floor.
  2. The Atlantic Ocean floor, shown in rainbow colors according to age, is being subducted beneath the island arcs of the Lesser Antilles.
  3. Image of the Atlantic Ocean in special coloring in order to show the profile of the Atlantic Ocean floor. (Web site)

Pacific Ocean Floor

  1. The Pacific Ocean floor, broken into several plates, including the Farallon Plate, was being pushed under Asia and North America, melting at the edges. (Web site)
  2. The presence of 10,000 or more undersea volcanoes on the Pacific Ocean floor, however, long defied explanation. (Web site)
  3. But if one measures from the actual base Hawaii's Mauna Kea is king at 33,476 feet (more than 6.33 miles) from base on the Pacific Ocean floor to tip. (Web site)

Hydrogen Sulfide

  1. In areas on the ocean floor which were anoxic, the breakdown of organics created hydrogen sulfide. (Web site)

Basaltic

  1. They are built up from repeated basaltic flows, often beginning at the ocean floor. (Web site)

Volcanic

  1. The volcanic activity began millions of years ago when submarine lava flows were erupted on the ocean floor.

Theory

  1. Study of the deep ocean floor was critical to development of the theory; the field of deep sea marine geology accelerated in the 1960s.

Anomalies

  1. In the 1960s, the past record of geomagnetic reversals was noticed by observing the magnetic stripe "anomalies" on the ocean floor. (Web site)

Blue Whales

  1. Blue whales can create very loud sounds and it is possible that the whales use these sounds to sense geographical features of the ocean floor.

Halibut

  1. This disguises a halibut from above (blending with the ocean floor) and from below (blending into the light from the sky).

North

  1. The ocean floor has been since gradually rising, eventually giving birth in 1927 to a new island, north of what remains of Rakata.

Hook

  1. He convinces them to take him out fishing, but catches his hook upon the ocean floor. (Web site)

Part

  1. The continental shelf is the part of the ocean floor next to each of the continents. (Web site)
  2. This part of the mountain belt also contains highly altered remnants of the ocean floor that once separated the two continents. (Web site)
  3. Green Sand - is used as a soil amendment and fertilizer and is mined from deposits of minerals that were originally part of the ocean floor.

Mountains

  1. The Moho is at a depth of 5-10 km beneath the ocean floor and about 35 km below the continents (but down to 60 km below mountains).

Map

  1. Also where you find exceptions look to a map of the ocean floor and see if the continental shelf can account for some of what you see as a discrepancy. (Web site)
  2. Efforts to map the ocean floor intensified, thanks in large part to the newly-created U.S. Office of Naval Research. (Web site)
  3. The crew also used the first electronic sounding devices to map the ocean floor. (Web site)

Mapping

  1. The speed of sound in water is of interest to those mapping the ocean floor.
  2. Thanks to technological efforts and the mapping of the ocean floor, it became known that there was an oceanic ridge system. (Web site)

Surface

  1. The Coral Sea is a mountain group that rises approximately 2,000 meter (6,600 feet) from the ocean floor and comes all the way up to the surface.
  2. In this region, cold water pushes nutrients from the ocean floor to the surface, where ocean life thrives. (Web site)

Bottom

  1. Bacteria occur in almost every environment on Earth, from the bottom of the ocean floor, deep inside solid rock, to the cooling jackets of nuclear reactors. (Web site)

Methane

  1. A cold seep (sometimes called a cold vent) is an area of the ocean floor where hydrogen sulfide, methane and other hydrocarbon -rich fluid seepage occurs.
  2. Methane feeds bacterial ecosystems, chemosynthetic communities and deep-water or cold water corals that live on the ocean floor. (Web site)

Tsunami

  1. The quake struck 11.2 miles (18.0 km) below the ocean floor and generated a tsunami. (Web site)

Earthquake

  1. In places, the earthquake caused the ocean floor to shift as much as 65 feet (20 meters). (Web site)
  2. The area where the earthquake occurred is where the Pacific Ocean floor is subducting (or being pushed downwards) under Alaska. (Web site)

Crustaceans

  1. Belonging to the baleen whale group, they have plates for filtering marine worms and crustaceans from the ocean floor. (Web site)

Feed

  1. The shape and position of the mouth indicate that this whale may feed very near the ocean floor.
  2. Like humans, whales are usually right-handed, and primarily feed from the right side of their mouths when they canvas the ocean floor.
  3. They feed on large schools of crustaceans, specifically copepods and krill and may feed on small fish near the ocean floor.

Wegener

  1. Wegener also noted differences between the continents and the ocean floor.

Geologists

  1. The weakness of Wegner's theory, and the reason it was not readily accepted by geologists was that he proposed that the continents slide over ocean floor. (Web site)

Corals

  1. Some of these animals are carnivorous, feeding on corals and scavenging the ocean floor.

Sponges

  1. The scraping of the ocean floor in bottom dragging is devastating to coral, sponges and other long-lived species that do not recover quickly. (Web site)
  2. Sponges are extremely primitive creatures that live attached to the ocean floor, in some cases, at extreme depths.

Water

  1. Large deposits of methane hydrates, frozen mixtures of hydrocarbon gas (mostly methane) and water, occur over large areas of the ocean floor. (Web site)
  2. It continues to move as part of the ocean floor and will eventually collect layers of sediment descending from the water above.
  3. Even if the water was removed, he said, a person would still see differences between the continents and the ocean floor.

Rift

  1. They are geologically active, with new magma constantly emerging onto the ocean floor through a gap called a rift in the earth's crust. (Web site)

Upward

  1. Dagon Dagon (1917) H. P. Lovecraft A man discovers a terrible undersea civilization when his boat is swamped on an island spewed upward from the ocean floor.

Hawaiian Islands

  1. High volcanic islands such as the Hawaiian Islands and low coral islands throughout Oceania continue to rise from the ocean floor of the Pacific. (Web site)

Form

  1. These areas can form in the middle of continents or on the ocean floor. (Web site)
  2. Ocean ridges are linear features on the ocean floor where molten magma originating in the earth's mantle rises and solidifies to form new ocean crust. (Web site)
  3. Most transform faults are found on the ocean floor, where they often offset active spreading ridges to form a zigzag plate boundary. (Web site)

Limestone

  1. Minerals in the limestone indicated that they came from a nearby source of granite that was unlikely to occur on the ocean floor.
  2. The mélange contains large lumps of limestone from the ocean floor, as well as basalt, Torlesse sandstones and other lithologies. (Web site)
  3. It's the work of old cabernet vines grown on a sunny ridge 2,600 feet above the Pacific, their roots deep into limestone that was once the ocean floor.

Surveys

  1. However, as surveys of the ocean floor continued around the world, it was discovered that every ocean contains parts of the mid-ocean ridge system. (Web site)
  2. The four Hecla class vessels were replaced by the survey vessel HMS Scott which surveys the ocean floor. (Web site)

Categories

  1. Basalt
  2. Events > Earthquakes > Plate Tectonics > Oceanic Crust
  3. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Places > Earth > Continents
  4. Plates
  5. Geology > Volcanoes > Active Volcanoes > Mauna Loa

Related Keywords

    * Abyssal Plain * Basalt * Basalts * Beneath * Benthic * Bottom Feeders * Common Features * Continent * Continental Margin * Continental Plates * Continents * Crust * Deepest Parts * Depth * Depths * Dive * Divergent Plate Boundaries * Dredging * Earth * Earthquakes * Feet * Flood Basalts * Gray Whale * Height * Hydrothermal Vent * Hydrothermal Vents * Lava * Magma * Mantle Beneath * Mauna Kea * Mauna Loa * Mid-Oceanic Ridges * Mid-Ocean Ridge * Mid-Ocean Ridges * Millions * Mud * North American Plate * Ocean * Oceanic Crust * Oceanic Ridges * Oceans * Ocean Floors * Ocean Trenches * Pacific Plate * Plate * Plates * Plate Tectonics * Relatively Uniform * Ridges * Rock * Rocks * Rocky Outcrop * Sea-Floor Spreading * Seabed * Seamounts * Sea Floor Spreading * Sea Level * Sediment * Sediments * Spreading * Spreading Center * Subduction * Subduction Zones * Tectonic Plates * Topography * Trench * Vents * Volcano * Volcanoes
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  Short phrases about "Ocean Floor"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Links checked: January 08, 2013.
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