KeyWEn.com  
 
 
 
Olympias       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Philip > Olympias   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
CLEOPATRA EURYDICE
SEVERAL
CLOSER
HAND
YEAR
ASSASSINATION
MURDER
THOUGHT
TIME
DIONYSUS
DAUGHTER
MARRIAGE
YEARS
LEONIDAS
LIFE
PLUTARCH
SON ALEXANDER
HUSBAND
NICANOR
ALEXANDER IV
MOLOSSIA
AMPHIPOLIS
PYDNA
ROXANA
WIFE
MACEDONIA
PELOPONNESUS
KING
GREAT
GREAT FRIEND
PRINCESS
SON
NEOPTOLEMUS
MOTHER
ANTIPATER
POLYPERCHON
EURYDICE
KING PHILIP
CASSANDER
ALEXANDER
EPIRUS
MACEDON
PHILIP
OLYMPIAS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Olympias"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Olympias is a reconstruction of an ancient Athenian trireme.
  2. Olympias was daughter of Neoptolemus, king of Epirus.
  3. Olympias was daughter of Neoptolemus, king of Epirus,[4] descent from the lineage of Aeacidae (a well respected family of Greece).
  4. Olympias is put to death, young Alexander and his mother are kept under close arrest.
  5. Olympias was immediately executed, while the king and his mother were taken prisoner and held in the citadel of Amphipolis under the supervision of Glaucias.

Cleopatra Eurydice

  1. Olympias murdered Caranus, son of Philip and his last wife, Cleopatra Eurydice.

Several

  1. Olympias and several of Alexander's friends suggested to Alexander that this move showed that Philip intended to make Arrhidaeus his heir.

Closer

  1. Alexander had always been closer to Olympias than Philip and everybody knew it.

Hand

  1. Olympias, Alexander's mother on the other hand was from Eprius and, thus, Alexander was regarded as being only half-Macedonian.

Year

  1. In the summer of the same year, Olympias gave birth to her first child Alexander.

Assassination

  1. Olympias certainly, Alexander probably, connived at the assassination of Philip, whose removal was necessary to their own safety.

Murder

  1. In 316 he had Olympias executed for the murder of King Philip III and of his brother.

Thought

  1. Philip's murder was once thought to have been planned with the knowledge and involvement of Alexander or Olympias.

Time

  1. At the same time, Perdiccas was offered by Olympias the hand of her daughter Cleopatra.
  2. Although Philip had either seven or eight wives, Olympias was his principal wife for a time.

Dionysus

  1. It is said that Philip II had first fallen in love with Olympias when they were among the initiants into the Kabeiria Mysteries of Dionysus in Samothrace.

Daughter

  1. Olympias had Cleopatra Eurydice and her daughter by Philip, Europa, burned alive.

Marriage

  1. Arymbas made a treaty of alliance with Philip of Macedon, which was cemented by a marriage between Philip and Neoptolemos' daughter, Olympias.
  2. The court had gathered there for the celebration of the marriage between Alexander I of Epirus and Philip's daughter, by his fourth wife Olympias, Cleopatra.

Years

  1. Olympias and Philip had two children in quick succession: Alexander, born in 356 B.C., and Cleopatra, born two years later.

Leonidas

  1. Later, Alexander was educated by a strict teacher: Leonidas, himself a relative of Olympias.

Life

  1. Her original name as a child was called Polyxena and then, at marriage, Myrtale; later in life she was also known as Olympias and Stratonice.

Plutarch

  1. Plutarch (Alexander 2.2-3) relates that both Philip and Olympias dreamt of their son's future birth.

Son Alexander

  1. This marriage led to a break with Olympias and his son Alexander.

Husband

  1. Eurydice and her husband were captured and turned over to Olympias, who showed them no mercy.
  2. Persians, Athenians, Thebans, could have organized this plot and also Olympias had reasons to murder her husband.

Nicanor

  1. Both she and her husband, however, together with Cassander's brother, Nicanor, were soon after slain by Olympias.

Alexander Iv

  1. During this period, Olympias was in physical control of Alexander IV, while Cassander was mostly in control of Macedon itself.

Molossia

  1. In 357 BC he married Olympias, from the royal house of Molossia, and a year later they had a son, Alexander.
  2. The most important marriage for Philip was to Olympias, from the royal house of Molossia.

Amphipolis

  1. When the city fell two years later, Olympias was killed, and Cassander would have Alexander IV and Roxanne confined at Amphipolis.

Pydna

  1. Cassander at once marched against Olympias, and, having forced her to surrender in Pydna, put her to death (316).

Roxana

  1. Roxana, who had recently become a devoted adherent of Olympias, as well as the young Alexander, were kept in close arrest for a time.

Wife

  1. Alexander had no part in the murder of his father, although he may have resented him because he neglected Olympias for another wife.
  2. His wife, Olympias (originally Myrtale), now 38, withdraws in fury to her native Epirus (see 336 B.C.).

Macedonia

  1. The historian Plutarch wrote that Olympias introduced wild religious ritual into Macedonia, particularly among women who worshiped Dionysus, the god of wine.
  2. For a short period Olympias was mistress of Macedonia.

Peloponnesus

  1. While Cassander is occupied in the Peloponnesus, Olympias leads an army into Macedonia.
  2. Cassander hastened from Peloponnesus, and, after an obstinate siege, compelled the surrender of Pydna, where Olympias had taken refuge.

King

  1. One year before Philip had married the Epirote princess Olympias, who was the daughter of the king of the Molossians.

Great

  1. Another version of the Vergina Sun, with 12 rays, was found on the larnax of Olympias, the mother of Alexander the Great.
  2. The original name of Olympias, mother of Alexander the great, as a child.
  3. Also in 2004, Jolie played Olympias in Alexander, Oliver Stone's biographical film about the life of Alexander the Great.

Great Friend

  1. He started as a great friend to both the young Alexander and the boy's mother, Olympias; there were even rumours that he was Alexander's father.

Princess

  1. The Aeacidae's efforts gained impetus from the marriage of Philip II of Macedon to their princess, Olympias.
  2. His mother was Olympias, princess of Epirus.
  3. Alexander's mother, Olympias, was a princess of the royal house of Molossia in Epirus (northwestern Greece).

Son

  1. Pyrrhus was the son of Aeacides and Phthia, a Thessalian woman, and a second cousin of Alexander the Great (via Alexander's mother, Olympias).
  2. After him, Antigonus, the son of Demetrius who went off to Cyrene and of Olympias the daughter of Pauliclitus of Larisa, [ruled] for 9 years.
  3. He was son of the Macedonian king Philip II and Olympias, princess of Molossians in Epirus.

Neoptolemus

  1. Olympias herself, was daughter of Neoptolemus, king of Epirus and most likely of an Epirotan woman, Anasatia [4].

Mother

  1. His father was Philip II, king of Macedonia and his mother Olympias (daughter of King Neoptolemus of Epirus).
  2. Following this, Alexander was educated by a strict teacher: Leonidas, a relative of his mother Olympias.
  3. Although Philip was proud of Alexander for taming Bucephalus, Alexander was closer to his mother Olympias and made no secret of this fact.

Antipater

  1. Upon the death of Antipater, Roxana flees with her child to Epirus seeking the protection of Olympias, Alexander's mother.
  2. Antipater and Olympias presently demanded the surrender of Harpalus.

Polyperchon

  1. From there Polyperchon accompanies Olympias, Roxana and the boy to Macedonia.
  2. Olympias, on the other hand, made matters worse for Polyperchon by invading Macedonia from Epirus.

Eurydice

  1. Philip and Eurydice were captured and executed on December 25, 317 BC, leaving Alexander IV king, and Olympias in effective control, as she was his regent.
  2. Olympias, who was almost sixty years old at this time, was dressed as a priestess of Dionysus, and Eurydice wore Macedonian armor.
  3. Olympias imprisoned Eurydice and her husband Philip Arrhidaeus; he was executed and Eurydice was forced to hang herself.

King Philip

  1. Born in Pella, capital of Macedon, Alexander was the son of King Philip II of Macedon and of his fourth wife Olympias, an Epirote princess.
  2. Born in Pella, Macedonia (modern day Greece), Alexander was the son of King Philip II of Macedon and of his fourth wife Olympias, an Epirote princess.
  3. Alexander the Great was the son of King Philip II of Macedon and of his fourth wife, Epirote princess Olympias.

Cassander

  1. A few months later Eumenes received an offer of alliance from Polyperchon and Olympias, who at the time were enemies of Antigonus and Cassander.
  2. Cassander besieged Olympias in Pydna and forced her to surrender, although Polyperchon and Aeacides tried to relieve her.
  3. Cassander besieged and captured Pydna in 317 BC and had the queen mother, Olympias, who had taken refuge there, put to death.

Alexander

  1. The next year his marriage with Olympias, the Molossian princess of Epirus (the mother of Alexander the Great), helped to stabilize his western frontier.
  2. With Andromache, who had been enslaved, Neoptolemus was the father of Molossus and ancestor of Olympias, the mother of Alexander the Great.
  3. Alexander the Great 's widow, Roxana, joins Alexander's mother, Olympias, in Epirus.

Epirus

  1. Polyperchon advanced against her from Epirus, accompanied by Aeacides, the king of that country, and Olympias, as well as by Roxana and her infant son.
  2. A few months later, Olympias was able to persuade her relative Aeacides of Epirus to invade Macedon with Polyperchon.
  3. Accompanied by Alexander, Olympias withdrew for approximately a year to Epirus, where her brother Alexander I of Epirus was now king.

Macedon

  1. Not long after Olympias (375-316BC) gave birth to her son, Alexander, her relationship with her husband, King Philip of Macedon, disintegrated.
  2. The son of Philip II of Macedon and Olympias, he had Aristotle as his tutor and was given a classical education.
  3. Alexander the Great, born in 356 BCE in Pella, Macedonia, was the son of Philip of Macedon and Princess Olympias of Epirus.

Philip

  1. Olympias later ordered Eurydice and her child by Philip to be murdered, in order to secure Alexander's position as king of Macedonia.
  2. Arymbas II was a respected figure in the ancient world, and his niece, Olympias, married Philip II of Macedon and was the mother of Alexander the Great.
  3. Eventually Philip and Alexander would reconcile; the son returned home, but Olympias remained in Epirus.

Olympias

  1. Alexander, born in Pella, the ancient capital of Macedonia, was the son of Philip II, king of Macedonia, and of Olympias, a princess of Epirus.
  2. Olympias, wife of Philip II of Macedon and mother of Alexander the Great.
  3. He was the son of Neoptolemus and brother of Olympias, the mother of Alexander the Great.

Categories

  1. Philip
  2. Science > Geography > Regions > Epirus
  3. Monarchy > Monarchs > Regents > Cassander
  4. Macedon
  5. Earth > Continents > Europe > Alexander
  6. Books about "Olympias" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Olympias"
  Originally created: August 01, 2010.
  Please send us comments and questions by this Online Form
  Please click on Move Up to move good phrases up.
0.016 sec. a=1..