KeyWEn.com  
 
 
 
Orbitals       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Nature > Matter > Particles > Electrons > Orbitals   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
INDIVIDUAL ELECTRONS
DIFFERENT SHELLS
ANGULAR MOMENTUM QUANTUM
MO DIAGRAM
STABLE ELECTRON ORBITALS
BASIS
LINEAR COMBINATIONS
HYBRID ORBITAL
MIXING ORBITALS
HYDROGEN-LIKE ATOMIC ORBITALS
ORIGINAL ATOMIC ORBITALS
BOND AXIS
HYBRID ATOMIC ORBITALS
HYDROGEN 3S
INDIVIDUAL ORBITALS
ATOMIC ORBITALS APPROXIMATION
HIGHER ENERGY ORBITALS
THREE ORBITALS
ENERGY SEQUENCE
PI BOND
HYBRIDISED ORBITALS
ATOMIC ORBITALS MOLECULAR ORBITAL METHOD
DEGENERATE ORBITALS
ANTI-BONDING ORBITALS
FORM MOLECULAR ORBITALS
FIRST FIVE ATOMIC ORBITALS
DIFFERENT ORBITALS
FIG
SHOWS
SHOWING
MODIFIED
RULES
PLOTS
PAIRING
DIFFERING
BOXES
CLOUD
STABLE
SET
PAIRS
REGION
VALUES
VALUE
ELECTRON ORBITALS
QUANTUM MECHANICS
ELEMENTS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Orbitals"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Orbitals are filled in the order of increasing n + l; Where two orbitals have the same value of n + l, they are filled in order of increasing n. (Web site)
  2. Orbitals are a model representation of the behaviour of electrons within molecules.
  3. Orbitals are occupied by electrons from lowest energy orbital to highest energy orbital (in the order s, p, d, f).
  4. Orbitals are designated by the notation: n S g. (Web site)
  5. The orbitals are organized into shells and subshells, based on their overall energy and angular momentum. (Web site)

Individual Electrons

  1. Such wave patterns, called orbitals, describe the distribution of individual electrons.

Different Shells

  1. Electrons in an atom, for example, can shift between the different energy levels corresponding to orbitals in different shells. (Web site)

Angular Momentum Quantum

  1. Consequently the spatial symmetries of atomic orbitals are completely determined by the angular momentum quantum numbers l and m. (Web site)

Mo Diagram

  1. The MO diagram for diboron (B-B electron configuration boron: 1s 2 2s 2 2p 1) requires the introduction of an atomic orbital overlap model for p orbitals. (Web site)
  2. The next step in constructing an MO diagram is filling the newly formed molecular orbitals with electrons.

Stable Electron Orbitals

  1. After all, this is how the concept of stable electron orbitals is working even on quantum level. (Web site)

Basis

  1. It can be decomposed into a series of atomic orbitals which form a basis for the possible wave functions.
  2. Band structures of materials like Si, GaAs, SiO 2 and diamond for instance are well described by TB-Hamiltonians on the basis of atomic sp 3 orbitals. (Web site)

Linear Combinations

  1. In this approach, the molecular orbitals are expressed as linear combinations of atomic orbitals. (Web site)

Hybrid Orbital

  1. You must always remember that the number of hybrid orbital you create equals the number of atomic orbitals that was initially combined.

Mixing Orbitals

  1. Quantum mechanically, this corresponds to mixing orbitals that differ in the l and m quantum numbers, such as the s (l =0) and p (l =1) atomic orbitals.

Hydrogen-Like Atomic Orbitals

  1. The solutions are one-electron functions and are referred to as hydrogen-like atomic orbitals. (Web site)

Original Atomic Orbitals

  1. This MO is called the bonding orbital and its energy is lower than that of the original atomic orbitals. (Web site)
  2. These molecular orbitals are a cross between the original atomic orbitals and generally extend between the two bonding atoms.

Bond Axis

  1. The 1 s and 2 s atomic orbitals and the 2 p orbital which is directed along the bond axis are all left unchanged by a rotation about the symmetry axis. (Web site)

Hybrid Atomic Orbitals

  1. In considering the formation of molecular orbitals it is often useful to think in terms of hybrid atomic orbitals. (Web site)

Hydrogen 3S

  1. The dsp 3 orbitals are constructed from the hydrogen 3s, 3p x, 3p y, 3p z and 3d z 2 orbitals. (Web site)

Individual Orbitals

  1. The individual orbitals represent a certain amount of energy.

Atomic Orbitals Approximation

  1. The linear combination of atomic orbitals approximation for molecular orbitals was introduced in 1929 by Sir John Lennard-Jones.

Higher Energy Orbitals

  1. The main reason why electrons exist in higher energy orbitals is because only two electrons can exist in any orbital. (Web site)
  2. Aufbau or Build-up Principle Electrons enter and fill lower energy orbitals before higher energy orbitals. (Web site)

Three Orbitals

  1. Thus the s subshell has only one orbital, the p subshell has three orbitals, and so on. (Web site)

Energy Sequence

  1. Thus, electrons fill orbitals in the order specified by the energy sequence given above. (Web site)

Pi Bond

  1. This behaviour stems from the best overlap of the 2 p orbitals of the adjacent carbons when the pi bond has to be formed.

Hybridised Orbitals

  1. The sum of X and E, sometimes known as the steric number, is also associated with the total number of hybridised orbitals used by valence bond theory.

Atomic Orbitals Molecular Orbital Method

  1. See Linear combination of atomic orbitals molecular orbital method.The quantum number n first appeared in the Bohr model.

Degenerate Orbitals

  1. Degenerate orbitals for electrons in an atomic subshell are orbitals at identical energy levels.
  2. In hydrogen-like atoms all degenerate orbitals of fixed n and l, m and s varying between certain values (see below) form an atomic shell. (Web site)
  3. To answer this, we need to understand the concept of degenerate orbitals.

Anti-Bonding Orbitals

  1. Electrons in bonding orbitals result in the formation of a chemical bond, while those in anti-bonding orbitals prevent bonding. (Web site)

Form Molecular Orbitals

  1. The sign of the phase itself does not have physical meaning except when mixing orbitals to form molecular orbitals. (Web site)

First Five Atomic Orbitals

  1. The shapes of orbitals The shapes of the first five atomic orbitals: 1s, 2s, 2p x,2p y, and 2p z. (Web site)
  2. This illustration shows the wave functions of the first five atomic orbitals.

Different Orbitals

  1. Electrons can transfer between different orbitals by the emission or absorption of photons with an energy that matches the difference in potential. (Web site)
  2. Since two electrons in the same orbital must have opposite spins, this causes electrons to prefer to occupy different orbitals. (Web site)
  3. Circling the nucleus in different orbitals are electrons, negatively charged particles. (Web site)

Fig

  1. Density diagrams of the molecular orbitals for the LiH, CH, and HF molecules are illustrated in Fig. (Web site)

Shows

  1. Shows the orbitals (wave functions) of the hydrogen atom. (Web site)
  2. Figure 1 shows the proliferation of molecular orbitals that are formed as an increasing number of Na atoms are combined to make the solid.

Showing

  1. Also available is the Grand Table, showing many, many more orbitals in six different organizations. (Web site)
  2. A convenient way of showing the orbitals that the electrons live in is to draw "electrons-in-boxes". (Web site)

Modified

  1. That was modified by Sommerfeld from circular to elliptical orbits depending upon serveral factors, and that was modified to sub-orbits (orbitals).

Rules

  1. The rules for electron aufbau, i.e., how electrons are placed in orbitals, are given by the following rough scheme.

Plots

  1. These plots resembles the shapes of the atomic orbitals, but they are not atomic orbitals because the radial factor is missing. (Web site)

Pairing

  1. When a weak ligand complexes the metal ion, the crystal field splitting is small and the electrons can still occupy all of the d orbitals without pairing. (Web site)

Differing

  1. In most atoms, orbitals of differing l are not exactly degenerate but separated into a fine structure.

Boxes

  1. It considers atomic orbitals as "boxes" of fixed energy into which can be placed two electrons and no more. (Web site)
  2. The electronic structure can be illustrated adding electrons to boxes (to represent orbitals). (Web site)

Cloud

  1. Orbitals that are "p" orbitals can hold up to six (6) electrons in their cloud. (Web site)

Stable

  1. The sigma antibonding molecular orbital is less stable than the atomic orbitals.

Set

  1. An orbital consists of a set of quantum states that have a particular energy, and only a discrete set of these orbitals exist around the nucleus.
  2. The superatom suggestion is that free electrons in the cluster occupy a new set of orbitals that are defined by the entire group of atoms, i.e. (Web site)
  3. The set of orbitals associated with a particular value of are sometimes collectively called a subshell. (Web site)

Pairs

  1. Electrons are found in pairs in orbitals of the atom.

Region

  1. The s -orbitals for all n numbers are the only orbitals with an anti-node (a region of high wave function density) at the center of the nucleus. (Web site)
  2. A chromophore is a region in a molecule where the energy difference between two different molecular orbitals falls within the range of the visible spectrum.

Values

  1. Note in particular that the size of the energy splitting is different for the different orbitals, because the g J values are different. (Web site)

Value

  1. For this reason, orbitals with the same value of n are said to comprise a " shell ". (Web site)
  2. According to the value of m, orbitals can be divided on the basis of their energy.
  3. An electron shell, also known as a main energy level, is a group of atomic orbitals with the same value of the principal quantum number n.

Electron Orbitals

  1. The atom quantum state is defined just by the quantum state of it's electron orbitals, not the nuclei. (Web site)
  2. The pattern here is the same as that for the electron orbitals, which serves as a memory guide. (Web site)

Quantum Mechanics

  1. The development of physical theories of electron orbitals in hydrogen was important in the development of quantum mechanics. (Web site)

Elements

  1. Atomic orbitals are then described, using a minimum of mathematics, followed by a discussion of the electron configurations of the elements.

Categories

  1. Nature > Matter > Particles > Electrons
  2. Nature > Matter > Atoms > Atom
  3. Orbital
  4. Anatomy > Mouth > Teeth > Bonding
  5. Shells

Related Keywords

    * Angular Momentum * Angular Momentum Quantum Number * Approximations * Atom * Atomic * Atomic Orbitals * Atoms * Aufbau Principle * Axes * Balmer Series * Bond * Bonding * Bonding Orbitals * Carbon * Carbon Atom * Carbon Atoms * Case * Chemical Bonds * Complicated * Different Energies * Eigenfunctions * Electron * Electrons * Electron Cloud * Electron Configuration * Electron Shells * Energies * Energy * Energy Levels * Form * Forms * Geometry * Higher * High Probability * Hybrid * Hybridisation * Hybridization * Hybrids * Hybrid Orbitals * Hydrogen * Hydrogen Atom * Increasing Energy * Interactions * Mathematically * Mixtures * Molecular Orbital * Molecular Orbitals * Molecular Orbital Theory * Molecule * Molecules * Nucleons * Nucleus * Number * Orbital * Order * Orientation * Origin * Overlap * Overlapping * Oxygen Atom * Possible * Protons * Quantum * Quantum Number * Related * Shape * Shapes * Shell * Shells * Somewhat * Space * Spherical * Stable Form * Structure * Subshell * Subshells * Symmetries * Symmetry * Theory * Transition Metals * Valence * Whole Number
  1. Books about "Orbitals" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Orbitals"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Links checked: April 22, 2013.
  Please send us comments and questions by this Online Form
  Please click on Move Up to move good phrases up.
0.0237 sec. a=1..