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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Osteoblasts > Osteoclasts   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
MULTINUCLEATED OSTEOCLASTS
BONE DEGENERATION
BONE REMODELING UNITS
OVERACTIVE OSTEOCLASTS
CALCIFIED HC
LARGE
PLACE
FUSION
FORMING
DYNAMIC
MINERAL
SURFACE
FIRST
NUMBER
EFFECT
FORMATION
MECHANISM
ENZYMES
PROCESS
REMOVAL
MATRIX
ABSORPTION
ACTIVATED
STEM CELLS
LOWER JAW
TOOTH
ALVEOLAR BONE
BONE GROWTH
MONOCYTES
REABSORB
HMGB1
PARAFOLLICULAR CELLS
TRABECULAR BONE
CATHEPSIN
MEDULLARY CAVITY
EXPRESSION
FUNCTION
BONE SURFACES
BONE SURFACE
EXISTING BONE
OSTEOPOROSIS
OSTEOPETROSIS
LACUNAE
BONE MATRIX
BLOOD
PRECURSORS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Osteoclasts"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Osteoclasts, the cells which resorb bone, are often found associated with cancellous bone spicules with the marrow cavity (Osteoclast 1).
  2. Osteoclasts are activated at the beginning of the process, resorb the bone at the center, and hence create the marrow cavity. (Web site)
  3. Osteoclasts are the cells responsible for bone resorption (remodeling of bone to reduce its volume). (Web site)
  4. Osteoclasts are formed when RANK on osteoclast precursors are activated by RANK Ligand on the surface of a stromal cell. (Web site)
  5. Osteoclasts are cells that break down, or resorb, bone.

Multinucleated Osteoclasts

  1. These results suggest increased recruitment of mononucleated osteoclast precursors and multinucleated osteoclasts in Mmp-9 mice.

Bone Degeneration

  1. Bone degeneration, also known as bone resorption, is caused by specialized cells called osteoclasts. (Web site)

Bone Remodeling Units

  1. Osteoblasts and osteoclasts, coupled together via paracrine cell signalling, are referred to as bone remodeling units. (Web site)

Overactive Osteoclasts

  1. Instead of overactive osteoclasts, osteopetrosis results from a variety of genetic defects that impair the ability of osteoclasts to resorb bone.

Calcified Hc

  1. We found that EGFR deficiency resulted in delayed recruitment of osteoclasts into calcified HC during primary ossification. (Web site)

Large

  1. Osteoclasts are typically large, multinucleated cells, rich in the intracellular machinery required for bone resorption. (Web site)

Place

  1. Osteoblasts are formed from osteoclasts on the outer surfaces of bone and in bone cavities, and bone deposition takes place constantly in living bone.

Fusion

  1. Osteoclasts resorb bone and are derived from hematopoietic precursor cells formed by the fusion of monocytic cells at the bone sites to be resorbed.

Forming

  1. Osteoclasts prepare the site by dissolving old injured or weakened bone, leaving a crater for osteoblasts to assemble into as they begin forming new bone.
  2. Osteoclasts remove material from the center of the bone, forming the central cavity of the long bones. (Web site)

Dynamic

  1. Bone is a dynamic tissue and is constantly being remodeled by the actions of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. (Web site)

Mineral

  1. Osteoporosis results when more mineral is removed by the osteoclasts than what is deposited by the osteoblasts.

Surface

  1. Osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and lining cells cover the surface of the bone. (Web site)

First

  1. There are three reasons that osteoclasts are normally used: the first is for the reparation of bones after a break.

Number

  1. Calcitonin is thought to reduce the number and resorptive function of the osteoclasts. (Web site)

Effect

  1. However, there has been no report about the relationship between a tryptophan derivative and its effect on osteoblasts and osteoclasts. (Web site)

Formation

  1. We isolated wild type bone marrow cells from CD1 mice and cultured them in vitro with M-CSF and RANK ligand to induce the formation of osteoclasts. (Web site)

Mechanism

  1. They destroy bone through a rapid, transient (relative to osteoclasts) mechanism called osteocytic osteolysis. (Web site)

Enzymes

  1. Osteoclasts secrete enzymes that break down bone structure. (Web site)

Process

  1. Osteoblasts replenish bones with fresh calcium and osteoclasts erode redundant calcuim, this process is called bone resorption. (Web site)

Removal

  1. The next stage in the process consists in the removal of these primary bone spicules by the osteoclasts. (Web site)

Matrix

  1. Osteoclasts dissolve matrix by secreting hydrochloric acid, which attacks the mineral portion, and enzymes that digest the collagen and other proteins. (Web site)

Absorption

  1. Osteoclasts on the other hand, are responsible for the breakdown of bone, and effect the absorption and removal of bone.

Activated

  1. First, osteoclasts are activated to digest formed bone, and second, proliferation of osteoclasts occurs.
  2. Osteoclasts are apparently activated by "signals" from osteoblasts.

Stem Cells

  1. Osteoclasts are derived from stem cells in the red bone marrow. (Web site)
  2. Osteogenic, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes Osteogenic cells Miotic stem cells - form osteoblasts & other stem cells. (Web site)

Lower Jaw

  1. Osteoblasts and osteoclasts on trabecula of lower jaw of calf embryo.

Tooth

  1. Osteoblasts create bone and osteoclasts destroy it, especially if force is placed on a tooth.

Alveolar Bone

  1. In addition to typical connective tissue cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts may be found where the periodontal membrane enters the alveolar bone.

Bone Growth

  1. Endosteum contains osteoblasts, osteoprogenitor cells and osteoclasts, and is active in bone growth and repair. (Web site)

Monocytes

  1. D) OSTEOCLASTS: Large, multinucleate cells derived from monocytes. (Web site)

Reabsorb

  1. During the life of an individual, osteoblasts continually secrete minerals while osteoclasts continually reabsorb the minerals. (Web site)

Hmgb1

  1. Since HMGB1 has chemotactic effects on endothelial cells (32, 46), we tested for similar effects on osteoclasts and osteoblasts.

Parafollicular Cells

  1. A hormone secreted by parafollicular cells of the thyroid gland that inhibits bone resorption by osteoclasts and lowers blood calcium levels. (Web site)

Trabecular Bone

  1. The trabecular bone is first resorbed by osteoclasts, creating a shallow resorption pit known as a "Howship's lacuna". (Web site)

Cathepsin

  1. Cathepsin K is a collagenolytic, papain -like, cysteine protease that is mainly expressed in osteoclasts, and is secreted into the resorptive pit. (Web site)

Medullary Cavity

  1. At the same time, osteoclasts in the endosteum break down bone on the internal bone surface, around the medullary cavity. (Web site)

Expression

  1. To determine whether EGFR ligands can act directly on osteoclasts, we determined expression of EGFR by osteoclasts. (Web site)

Function

  1. There are also cells called osteoclasts that function to absorb calcium phosphate.
  2. These data suggest that EGFR ligands may act directly on osteoclasts to affect their function. (Web site)

Bone Surfaces

  1. Osteoclasts are large, multinucleated cells located on bone surfaces in what are called Howship's lacunae. (Web site)

Bone Surface

  1. Osteopontin - an adhesive glycoprotein related to sialoproteins, which is secreted by osteoclasts to assist in their adhesion to the bone surface.

Existing Bone

  1. This consists of removal o existing bone by osteoclasts an deposition of new bone by osteoblasts. (Web site)

Osteoporosis

  1. The result included osteoclasts, cells that play a role in osteoporosis, and eosinophils, which are involved in allergy and asthma.
  2. Some forms of osteoporosis (brittle bones) are caused by overactive osteoclasts. (Web site)

Osteopetrosis

  1. Sufferers of osteopetrosis have a deficiency of osteoclasts, meaning too much bone is being created.
  2. RANKL knockout mice exhibit a phenotype of osteopetrosis and defects of tooth eruption, along with an absence or deficiency of osteoclasts. (Web site)
  3. Another disease, osteopetrosis is a rare childhood disorder of bone in which abnormal osteoclasts are unable to resorb bone. (Web site)

Lacunae

  1. Howship John, 1781-1841, English surgeon; H.'s lacunae or foveolae= small depressions in bone where resporption of bone by osteoclasts takes place. (Web site)

Bone Matrix

  1. Osteoclasts (OS-tee-oh-klasts): Large cells that break down bone matrix. (Web site)
  2. They were believed by Kölliker to be concerned in the absorption of bone matrix, and hence the name which he gave to them— osteoclasts. (Web site)
  3. Osteoclasts attach themselves to the bone matrix and form a tight seal at the rim of the attachment site.

Blood

  1. It contains osteoblasts (bone-forming cells), osteoclasts (bone-destroying cells), nerve fibers, and blood and lymphatic vessels. (Web site)

Precursors

  1. There, they proliferate and differentiate into TRAP+ cells that are the precursors of multinucleated osteoclasts (3). (Web site)

Categories

  1. Osteoblasts
  2. Bone Resorption
  3. Osteocytes
  4. Remodeling
  5. Calcitonin

Related Keywords

    * Bone * Bones * Bone Formation * Bone Resorption * Break * Calcitonin * Calcium * Cartilage * Cells * Chondrocytes * Macrophages * Ossification * Osteoblasts * Osteocytes * Parathyroid Hormone * Phagocytic * Pth * Recruitment * Remodeling * Resorption * Spongy Bone * Trabeculae
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  Short phrases about "Osteoclasts"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Links checked: June 08, 2013.
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