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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Supercontinent > Pangea   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
EDGES
INTERIOR
P-DRIVE
SUPER-CONTINENT PANGEA
GIANT CONTINENT
GREAT SUPERCONTINENT
LATE PALEOZOIC SUPERCONTINENT
PANGEA ULTIMA
FIG
PROPOSED
MEANING
RESULTING
COMPLETE
BEGINNING
YEARS
DETACHED
SUBDUCTION
LAND
CHUNKS
AREAS
DESERTS
CLUSTERED
OCEAN
PACIFIC PLATE
NORTH AMERICAN
END
SPLIT
PART
ATLANTIC
FORMATION
ROCKS
RIFT
ASSEMBLY
PLATE TECTONICS
CONTINENTAL DRIFT
PLATES
COLLISION
NORTH
SOUTH POLE
SOUTHERN PORTION
LATE TRIASSIC
TRIASSIC
JURASSIC
LANDMASSES
NORTH AMERICAN CRATON
MESOZOIC ERA
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Pangea"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Pangea was the first super continent with all seven continents connected into one. (Web site)
  2. Pangea was essentially complete by the Kungurian Age (late early Permian).
  3. Pangea was preceded by Pannotia about 550-650 million years ago and by Rhodinia around 1.8 billion years ago. (Web site)
  4. Pangea was shaped sort of like a giant "Pacman", with the mouth on the east.
  5. Pangea was surrounded by massive subduction plate tectonics.

Edges

  1. Pangea essentially turned inside out, the edges of the old continent becoming the collision zones of new continents. (Web site)

Interior

  1. The interior of Pangea was hot and dry during the Triassic.

P-Drive

  1. While logged into one of the GIS computers in Branner Library, users may upload files to the P-drive (named "gis on pangea.stanford.edu").

Super-Continent Pangea

  1. At the time of the Permian extinction, the continents had recently joined to form the super-continent Pangea and the super-ocean Panthalassa. (Web site)

Giant Continent

  1. At the time K. collinsoni was living, all the world's land was massed into a giant continent called Pangea. (Web site)

Great Supercontinent

  1. Yet, 250 million years later, they lay locked together as part of Pangea, the great supercontinent.

Late Paleozoic Supercontinent

  1. Laurasia The northern portion of the late Paleozoic supercontinent called Pangea. (Web site)

Pangea Ultima

  1. Chris Roberson's novel Paragaea is set on a world whose one continent is a version of Pangea Ultima.
  2. We call this future Pangea, "Pangea Ultima", because it is the final Pangea. (Web site)

Fig

  1. Thus, Pangea III had assembled by about 265 million years ago (Fig. (Web site)

Proposed

  1. He proposed that all the continents were once stuck together as one big land mass called Pangea. (Web site)

Meaning

  1. He decided to give this supercontinent a name and called it Pangea, meaning, "all lands". (Web site)

Resulting

  1. This produces counter forces to those which propel Pangea, resulting in the breakup of Pangea and the current statis of the continents.

Complete

  1. The reconstruction of the supercontinent Pangea was complete. (Web site)

Beginning

  1. When Pangea III broke up, beginning about 180 million years ago, North America once again became isolated from other continents. (Web site)

Years

  1. The theory of Pangea is that millions of years ago all the continents were joined together in one enormous land mass known as Pangea. (Web site)

Detached

  1. Most of the Mesozoic supercontinent of Pangea was now assembled although pieces of present East Asia still remained detached. (Web site)

Subduction

  1. Such a spatial pattern is consistent with subduction of large areas of seafloor at the edges of a continent configuration commonly known as Pangea. (Web site)
  2. The Carboniferous arc magmas were emplaced in response to subduction of the proto-Pacific oceanic crust as the supercontinent Pangea was assembled. (Web site)

Land

  1. The supercontinent Pangea (from the Greek, meaning "all land") was gradually assembled as the continents collided during the Late Paleozoic.

Chunks

  1. Scientists think these chunks moved independently until about 250 million years ago, when yet another supercontinent emerged, now called Pangea.
  2. These chunks moved independently until 250 million years ago, when the supercontinent Pangea formed, Rogers said. (Web site)

Areas

  1. The complete history of Pangea is consequently manifested in areas a continent apart. (Web site)

Deserts

  1. Deserts seem to have been widespread on Pangea. (Web site)

Clustered

  1. Geologists have documented that in late Paleozoic times all continents were clustered into one supercontinent called Pangea.

Ocean

  1. They were once joined together in the Pangea supercontinent, but the plates movement spread them apart and the divergent boundary created an ocean. (Web site)

Pacific Plate

  1. By 167 Ma, sea floor spreading to the west of Pangea formed ocean floor that we see today as the oldest ocean floor of the Pacific plate (Koppers et al.

North American

  1. More than 200 million years ago, the supercontinent Pangea broke up as the North American and African plates began drifting apart.

End

  1. Toward the end of the era, the continents gathered together into a supercontinent called Pangea, which included most of the Earth's land area.
  2. Toward the end of the Era, the continents gathered together into a supercontinent Pangea including most of the Earth's land area.

Split

  1. Diagram of five maps of the Earth showing Pangea and the positions of the continents as they split apart over time, from the U.S. Geological Survey.
  2. Next Pangea)implying that other future Pangeas will form and split as the cycle continues.

Part

  1. Glaciation of Gondwana that eventually made up part of the supercontinent of Pangea is suspected. (Web site)
  2. Some 250 million years ago during the Triassic period, Chile was part of Pangea.
  3. This drop may be attributed in part to biogeographic changes associated with the formation of Pangea.

Atlantic

  1. The birth of a new ocean basin, the Atlantic, signaled the end of Pangea. (Web site)
  2. In general, the Atlantic and Indian Oceans will continue to widen until new subduction zones bring the continents back together, forming a Future Pangea. (Web site)

Formation

  1. Due to the formation of the supercontinent Pangea, the sea level drops and the warm shallow seas decline in extent.
  2. The formation of the modern Andes began with the events of the Triassic when Pangea begun to break up and several rifts developed. (Web site)
  3. In this view, the formation of the Pacific plate is a consequence of the breakup of Pangea. (Web site)

Rocks

  1. When he plotted the rocks on a Pangea map, those on the east side of the Atlantic were continuous with their counterparts on the west side (Fig. (Web site)
  2. These rocks were mostly unaffected by the Phanerozoic collisions that formed Pangea. (Web site)

Rift

  1. When Pangea broke up, Avalonia's remains were divided by the rift which became the Atlantic Ocean.

Assembly

  1. Much of the large-scale tectonics on the Earth in the last Ga is predominated by the assembly and breakup of supercontinents Rodinia and Pangea. (Web site)
  2. The assembly of Pangea is finally complete and Northeast Africa presses into Southern Europe producing the Hercynian Orogeny.
  3. At the largest of scales, the geologic history of the past half-billion years can be said to reflect the assembly and breakup of the supercontinent Pangea. (Web site)

Plate Tectonics

  1. Although the existence of Pangea is a cornerstone of plate tectonics, geologists still do not understand the mechanisms responsible for its amalgamation. (Web site)

Continental Drift

  1. Using Tectonics 1.0, students can apply the theory of continental drift and attempt to reconstruct the ancient super continent of Pangea.
  2. Finally, it disregarded the evidence for continental drift before the existence of Pangea.

Plates

  1. Scientists believe that Pangea broke apart for the same reason that the plates are moving today.
  2. It is believed that at one time in the distant past all of the plates formed one huge continent called Pangea.

Collision

  1. Collision with Siberia produced the Ural Mountains in the latest Paleozoic and completed the formation of Pangea.

North

  1. The result was Pangea - the last supercontinent, which contained every major landmass except the two continents destined to become North and South China. (Web site)

South Pole

  1. High latitudes were affected first as a result of the waning of the Permian ice age when the southern edge of Pangea moved off the South Pole.

Southern Portion

  1. By 140 Ma, Gondwana (the southern portion of Pangea) had begun to fragment leading to India separating from Madagascar to form the Indian Ocean.
  2. Gondwana The southern portion of the late Paleozoic supercontinent known as Pangea.

Late Triassic

  1. By the Late Triassic, Pangea was beginning to rift apart along the suture of the Trans-Pangean Mountains. (Web site)

Triassic

  1. The supercontinent of Pangea, mostly assembled by the Triassic, allowed land animals to migrate from the South Pole to the North Pole. (Web site)
  2. At the beginning of the Triassic, the land was all together in one supercontinent, Pangea. (Web site)
  3. At the end of the Triassic, Pangea began to rift apart.

Jurassic

  1. During the late Triassic and early Jurassic, Pangea broke apart.
  2. When Pangea began to split apart in the Jurassic, South America and the adjacent land masses formed Gondwana. (Web site)
  3. The family is thought to have arisen in the Jurassic when the continents had coalesced into the supercontinent of Pangea, about 200 million years ago. (Web site)

Landmasses

  1. Despite the stable position, major changes occurred to its relation to other landmasses as the remains of Pangea continued to break apart. (Web site)

North American Craton

  1. About 1 billion years ago, a second supercontinent called Pangea II formed, with the North American craton near its center. (Web site)
  2. Thus, the North American craton was created during assembly of Pangea I and has remained essentially intact to this day. (Web site)

Mesozoic Era

  1. One time (but not the only time) was during the Mesozoic Era and the supercontinent was called Pangea.
  2. Laurasia formed as the supercontinent Pangea broke up during the Mesozoic Era. (Web site)
  3. Pangea began to break up about 220 million years ago, in the Early Mesozoic Era (Late Triassic Period). (Web site)

Categories

  1. Supercontinent
  2. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Places > Earth > Continents
  3. Gondwana
  4. Earth > Continents > Supercontinents > Laurasia
  5. Breakup

Related Keywords

    * Baltica * Break * Break-Up * Breakup * Carboniferous * Continent * Continental Collisions * Continents * Earth * Euramerica * Form * Forming * Form Pangea * Gondwana * Land Masses * Laurasia * Laurussia * North America * Pangaea * Pangea Supercontinent * Permian * Rheic Ocean * Rodinia * Single Supercontinent * Supercontinent * Supercontinents * Supercontinent Pangea * Super Continent * Time * Triassic Period * Wegener
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  Short phrases about "Pangea"
  Originally created: April 04, 2011.
  Links checked: July 18, 2013.
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