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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > History > Civilizations > Ancient Greece > Ancient Greeks > Plato   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
DIALOGUES
VIRTUE
PLATO
SOCRATES
PAGE PAPER
ARISTOTLE
BIBLIOGRAPHY LISTS
PHILOSOPHY
UNIVERSITY PRESS
REPUBLIC
DISCUSSES
WOMEN
FORM
PAGE REPORT DISCUSSES
PHILOSOPHER
KNOWLEDGE
ATHENS
NOTES
HACKER
PAPER DISCUSSING
SOUL
PAGE ESSAY
ACADEMY
ANCIENT
BC
DIFFERENCES
COMPARES
ARGUMENTS
JUSTICE
DISCUSSED
IMMORTAL
CITES
DISCUSSION
WISDOM
INTERPRETATION
CONSIDERS
TRIAL
GREEK
SYRACUSE
IDEAS
ARGUMENTATIVE
CONTENDS
ASSOCIATES
POLITICS
EARLIEST
WRITINGS
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Plato"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Plato is a Greek philosopher.
  2. Plato is a philosopher.
  3. Plato is probably one of the greatest philosophers of all times, if not the greatest. (Web site)
  4. Plato is a philosopher.
  5. Plato is the apparent heir of the socratic tradition and in this small opus pays his tributes to the master of his youth.

Dialogues

  1. Specifically discussed is the concept of being as explored in Aristotle's Physics, Metaphysics, and Plato's dialogue, Parmenides. (Web site)
  2. Imitating Plato, he wrote Dialogues in which his doctrines were expounded in somewhat popular language. (Web site)
  3. It was first described by Plato in the Socratic Dialogues.
  4. In the dialogue Timaeus, by the way, Plato invented a moralistic tale about a thoroughly fictitious land he called Atlantis. (Web site)
  5. There is a famous question discussed in one of the earlier Dialogues of Plato (Protagoras; Arist. (Web site)

Virtue

  1. Following Plato, he argued that the goodness or virtue of a thing lay in the realization of its specific nature. (Web site)
  2. Plato's ethical theory rests on the assumption that virtue is knowledge and can be taught, which has to be understood in terms of his theory of Forms.
  3. Here, as Aristotle remarks, Socrates and Plato outstep the truth--they make a part of virtue into the whole.

Plato

  1. When Plato was a child, his father died, and his mother married Pyrilampes, who was an associate of the statesman Pericles. (Web site)
  2. Topics include Rembrandt, Plato,Shakespeare, Jung, Dante, Mozart, Beethoven for substantial credits towards college and university degrees.
  3. This contradicts Plato's theory of one ruling class controlling the political power and all decisions that effect the entire society.
  4. Translations with commentaries also appear in the Clarendon Plato Series.
  5. Or, rather, he'd got stuck reading one particular sentence from a book on Plato.

Socrates

  1. The strange synthesis in the character of Socrates capped the synthesis in the mind of Plato. (Web site)
  2. We know from Plato's Symposium that Socrates was decorated for bravery.

Page Paper

  1. A 3 page paper that describes the Noble Myth of Socrates, also known as the Myth of Metals, in Plato's Republic. (Web site)
  2. A 5 page paper that discusses Plato's Republic and the concept of justice, good and human nature. (Web site)
  3. An 8 page paper which discusses three differences of opinions held by Plato and Aristotle, in relationship to their individual philosophies. (Web site)

Aristotle

  1. In a certain sense, Aristotle's method is both inductive and deductive, while Plato's is essentially deductive.
  2. Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics are an alternative to Plato.
  3. It is also probable that Plato suggested that Aristotle needed restraining rather than encouragement, but not that there was an open breach of friendship.
  4. The Pythagoreans and Plato, Zeno, and Aristotle had exoteric and esoteric teachings.
  5. Pinkard clearly shows how and why you have to deal with Hegel in Western Philosophy, just as much as you have to confront Plato, Aristotle, Kant.

Bibliography Lists

  1. A 6 page paper which discusses the dialogue between Socrates and Gorgias in Plato's book 'Gorgias.' Bibliography lists 4 additional sources. (Web site)
  2. Bibliography lists four sources in addition to writings of Marx and Plato. (Web site)
  3. Bibliography lists three sources in addition to several primary works by both Plato and Locke. (Web site)

Philosophy

  1. A thorough explanation of Plato's philosophy from * Christopher S. Planeaux.
  2. Plato, Complete Works is a must for the bookshelf of anyone interested in philosophy.
  3. In these 'Dialogues' Plato creates the figure of Socrates as first great hero of Western Philosophy.

University Press

  1. IV, Plato: the man and his dialogues, earlier period, Cambridge University Press, 1989, pp. (Web site)
  2. Harvard University Press publishes the hardbound series Loeb Classical Library, containing Plato's works in Greek, with English translations on facing pages. (Web site)

Republic

  1. Neither in the Republic, nor in any other Dialogue of Plato, is a single character repeated. (Web site)
  2. Plato's own theory of knowledge is found in the Republic, particularly in his discussion of the image of the divided line and the myth of the cave. (Web site)
  3. Plato's The Republic is not an explication of laws of the people.
  4. But the Republic of Plato, by these expansions, may be said to require, and so to anticipate, the astronomy of Laplace. (Web site)

Discusses

  1. Plato discusses a utopian society ruled by a philosopher king, followed in importance by the spirit-warrior and desire-worker. (Web site)
  2. Smith also discusses Plato’s view of function. (Web site)

Women

  1. I will argue that Plato respects only certain characteristics of women. (Web site)
  2. This supposed inferiority of women is also a sharp contrast to Plato's views on women. (Web site)
  3. Another writer who considers Plato to have enlightened views on women is Christine Pierce. (Web site)

Form

  1. Circularity, squareness, and triangularity are excellent examples, then, of what Plato meant by Forms. (Web site)
  2. There is a sense in which the Form of the Good represents Plato's movement in the direction of an ultimate principle of explanation. (Web site)

Page Report Discusses

  1. This 5 page report discusses Plato-s normative ethical theory in relation to the idea of the ethics of virtues as a division of ethical egoism. (Web site)
  2. This 5 page report discusses Nietzsche-s criticisms of Plato and then what Plato-s reaction would be to Nietzsche-s theories and beliefs.
  3. This 6 page report discusses Plato-s examination of the nature of justice.

Philosopher

  1. He claimed to be self-taught, although tradition states that he was schooled in the systems of Plato and Democritus by his father and various philosophers. (Web site)
  2. Plato's impact on Jewish thought is apparent in the work of the 1st-century Alexandrian philosopher Philo Judaeus. (Web site)
  3. Along with Plato, he is often considered to be one of the two most influential philosophers in Western thought.
  4. Plato discusses a utopian society ruled by a philosopher king, followed in importance by the spirit-warrior and desire-worker. (Web site)
  5. Plato: (429-348 BCE) Athenian philosopher, student of Socrates, associated with the mysticism of Pythagoras.

Knowledge

  1. Influenced by Socrates, Plato was convinced that knowledge is attainable. (Web site)
  2. In the former, Plato distinguishes between two levels of awareness: opinion and knowledge. (Web site)
  3. In philosophical language, Plato's theory of Forms is both an epistemological (theory of knowledge) and an ontological (theory of being) thesis. (Web site)

Athens

  1. From the age of 18 to 37 Aristotle remained in Athens as a pupil of Plato and distinguished himself at the Academy.
  2. Plato left Athens after Socrates had been executed and travelled in Egypt, Sicily and Italy. (Web site)

Notes

  1. Suggestions from users were vital to PLATO's evolution, and Notes was no exception. (Web site)
  2. PLATO Notes avoids some of the problems that have plagued experiments with anonymity in other conferencing systems. (Web site)
  3. In fact, a group in Chicago that was using PLATO to develop medical courseware wrote a clone of Notes for their own use. (Web site)

Hacker

  1. Plato, a political philosopher, was in the pursuit of philosophical truth (Hacker 114). (Web site)
  2. According to Plato public judgments of approval and disapproval are based on belief and not on knowledge (Hacker 59).

Paper Discussing

  1. A 10 page paper discussing affirmative action from the philosophical perspective of Plato. (Web site)
  2. A 5 page paper that demonstrates Socrates' arguments in Plato's Gorgias. (Web site)
  3. A 5 page paper discussing bot the similarities and differences between Plato and Machiavelli's views of political leadership. (Web site)

Soul

  1. For Plato, a healthy soul is one that is in harmony with the cosmos and strives for wisdom and knowledge. (Web site)
  2. Spelman claims that this shows that Plato considers souls to be gendered. (Web site)
  3. Plato divides the human soul into three parts: the rational part, the will, and the appetites. (Web site)
  4. Plato regarded the rational soul as immortal, and he believed in a world soul and a Demiurge, the creator of the physical world. (Web site)

Page Essay

  1. A 5 page essay on three of Plato's Dialogues -- Crito, the Apology, and the Republic, -- analyzing the main thrust of Socrates' arguments in each. (Web site)
  2. Virgil's "Aeneid" & Plato's "Republic ": A 2 page essay on fact vs. (Web site)

Academy

  1. From the age of 18 to 37 Aristotle remained in Athens as a pupil of Plato and distinguished himself at the Academy. (Web site)
  2. In 387 Plato founded the Academy in Athens, the institution often described as the first European university.
  3. In the later years of his association with Plato and the Academy he began to lecture on his own account, especially on the subject of rhetoric. (Web site)
  4. Plato remained at the Academy for the rest of his life, except for two brief periods in the 360s. (Web site)

Ancient

  1. Plato has one of the most charitable philosophies on women of any of the ancient philosophers. (Web site)
  2. PLATO: Ancient Greek, student of Socrates, most influential philosopher of all time.

Bc

  1. Plato returned to Athens, but visited Syracuse again in 361 BC hoping to be able to bring the rivals together. (Web site)
  2. When Plato died in 347 BC, Aristotle moved to Assos, a city in Asia Minor, where a friend of his, Hermias (d.

Differences

  1. This is one of the crucial differences between Plato and Aristotle. (Web site)
  2. Plato acknowledges that biological differences do not interfere with the function of humans. (Web site)

Compares

  1. A 6 page paper which compares Socrates- view of love, as interpreted by Plato in 'Symposium,' with the contemporary concept of love. (Web site)
  2. Cicero’s Commonwealth : A 6 page paper comparing Plato & Aristotle’s views on political order and justice with those of Cicero. (Web site)
  3. This 6 page paper compares modern religions with the philosophic ideas of Plato. (Web site)
  4. Plato compares the individual's soul to the society, finding in both the same types of corruption. (Web site)
  5. A 3 page paper which contemplates what Bertrand Russell would think of Plato's attempts to account for our knowledge of the nature of reality. (Web site)

Arguments

  1. There are many different arguments for why Plato was not a feminist. (Web site)
  2. Sidney's argument that in the Republic Plato attacks the abuses of poetry is even more problematic. (Web site)
  3. At times, the objections that Aristotle raises against the arguments of his own teacher, Plato, appear to rely on faulty interpretations of those arguments.
  4. Wherein it concerns states and rulers, Plato has made interesting arguments. (Web site)
  5. Plato mainly wrote philosophical dialogues, that is, arguments in the form of conversations, usually with Socrates as a participant. (Web site)

Justice

  1. Plato sees the justice and law as what sets the guidelines for societal behavior.
  2. A dialog has been imagined between Mohammed, Moses, and Plato regarding the topic of justice. (Web site)

Discussed

  1. Specifically discussed is the concept of being as explored in Aristotle's Physics, Metaphysics, and Plato's dialogue, Parmenides. (Web site)
  2. Plato's theory of Forms and his theory of knowledge are so interrelated that they must be discussed together.

Immortal

  1. Plato regarded the rational soul as immortal, and he believed in a world soul and a Demiurge, the creator of the physical world. (Web site)
  2. An 8 page discussion of Plato-s contention that the soul is immortal. (Web site)

Cites

  1. Bibliography cites the URL from which the full text of Plato's work was obtained. (Web site)
  2. The writer cites sources from Plato to Taylor, in an attempt to debate both sides of this issue. (Web site)

Discussion

  1. In this discussion we will determine the analogies that Plato used in the Republic and Rousseau in The Social Contract. (Web site)
  2. In any discussion or comparison of Aristotle and Plato, there are certain factors that it is important to understand. (Web site)

Wisdom

  1. Instead of rhetoric and persuasion, Plato says reason and wisdom should govern. (Web site)
  2. For Plato, a healthy soul is one that is in harmony with the cosmos and strives for wisdom and knowledge. (Web site)
  3. Plato emphasized four virtues in particular, which were later called cardinal virtues: wisdom, courage, temperance and justice. (Web site)

Interpretation

  1. At times, the objections that Aristotle raises against the arguments of his own teacher, Plato, appear to rely on faulty interpretations of those arguments.
  2. Bernard Suzanne's alternative interpretation of Plato and his dialogues. (Web site)

Considers

  1. This 4 page paper considers Plato's perspectives on liberty presented in The Republic. (Web site)
  2. This 8 page paper considers Socrates as the mentor of Plato, and discusses the paradox of learning as reflected in Meno. (Web site)
  3. This 5 page paper considers Plato's work Euthyphro which presents a study of truth and piety through a conversation between Euthyphro and Socrates. (Web site)
  4. Plato considers mathematical objects as perfect forms. (Web site)
  5. This paper considers the issue of equality as it relates to Plato's perspectives on government, politics, economic interests and equality of opportunity. (Web site)

Trial

  1. Now the Apology by Plato is NOT a stenographic report of the trial of Socrates. (Web site)
  2. The Apology, by Plato, is a defence speech Socrates supposedly gave at the trial. (Web site)
  3. However, there is no good evidence that the substance of the trial as crafted by Plato here is inaccurate. (Web site)

Greek

  1. Plato (ancient Greek: ------------, Pl--t--n, "wide, broad-shouldered") (c.
  2. The writings of Plato and Aristotle form the core of Ancient philosophy.
  3. Along with Socrates and Plato, Aristotle was one of the most influential of ancient Greek philosophers. (Web site)
  4. The Medieval scholastic philosophers did not have access to the works of Plato, nor the knowledge of Greek needed to read them. (Web site)

Syracuse

  1. Dion, the brother-in-law of Dionysius I, persuaded Plato to come to Syracuse to tutor Dionysius II, the new ruler. (Web site)
  2. Plato returned to Athens, but visited Syracuse again in 361 BC hoping to be able to bring the rivals together. (Web site)

Ideas

  1. The ideas in these works are attributed by most scholars to Plato himself, although Socrates continues to be the main character in many of the dialogues.
  2. The vagueness of where Socrates's ideas end and Plato's begin is discussed as well as the life and nature of Socrates. (Web site)
  3. Egyptian-born founder of Neoplatonism, who synthesized the ideas of Plato and other Greek philosophers. (Web site)

Argumentative

  1. An in-depth, 9 page examination of Plato's 'Phaedo' and the immortality of the soul. (Web site)
  2. A 6 page argumentative essay pitting the philosophies of Plato's 'Republic' and Hegel's 'Introduction to the Philosophy of History' against each other. (Web site)
  3. This 5 page argumentative essays uses the writings of Plato, Marx and Thucydides to support the argument that democracy is the worst form of government. (Web site)

Contends

  1. Plato contends that forms do not exist in the particular objects which partake in the forms. (Web site)
  2. This paper contends that the structure of Plato's utopia, including the distinct class system, is objectionable. (Web site)

Associates

  1. Plato associates the traditional Greek virtues with the class structure of the ideal state. (Web site)
  2. Yet Plato himself associates the two very closely: at Gorgias 502c he characterizes poetry as a kind of rhetoric. (Web site)

Politics

  1. Plato's ethics and politics in The Republic by Eric Brown. (Web site)
  2. In 403 BC there was a restoration of democracy at Athens and Plato had great hopes that he would be able to enter politics again. (Web site)

Earliest

  1. The earliest represent Plato's attempt to communicate the philosophy and dialectical style of Socrates.
  2. We should not assume that Plato could have written the preparatory dialogues only at the earliest stage of his career. (Web site)

Writings

  1. The writings of Plato and Aristotle form the core of Ancient philosophy.
  2. Plato's later writings often modify or completely abandon the formal structure of dialogue. (Web site)
  3. Allen argues that Plato has a great deal of inconsistency in his writings about women. (Web site)

Categories

  1. History > Civilizations > Ancient Greece > Ancient Greeks
  2. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Thought > Philosophy > Philosophers
  3. European Union > Greece > Attica > Athens
  4. Encyclopedia of Keywords > Society > Ethics
  5. Society > Culture > Languages > Language

Subcategories

Plutarch

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