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Progressive Supranuclear Palsy       Article     History   Tree Map
  Encyclopedia of Keywords > System Atrophy > Progressive Supranuclear Palsy   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
ADDITION
NORMAL DISTRIBUTION
RAJPUT
TAU
POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY
BRAIN
BRAIN ATROPHY
CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY
CASES
CLINICAL OUTCOMES
GENETIC HETEROGENEITY
SHY-DRAGER SYNDROME
SYMPTOMS SIMILAR
PATIENTS
DISEASE
PARKINSONISM
LEWY BODIES
CORTICOBASAL DEGENERATION
PSP
FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA
TAU GENE
PARKINSON DISEASE
SYSTEM ATROPHY
PROGRESSIVE SUPRANUCLEAR PALSY
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Progressive Supranuclear Palsy"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a rare brain disorder that causes serious and permanent problems with control of gait and balance. (Web site)
  2. Progressive supranuclear palsy is a movement disorder caused by damage to certain nerve cells in the brain.
  3. Progressive supranuclear palsy is a condition that causes symptoms similar to Parkinson's disease.

Addition

  1. In addition to multiple system atrophy, Parkinson-plus syndromes include progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal ganglionic degeneration. (Web site)

Normal Distribution

  1. Normal distribution of apolipoprotein E alleles in progressive supranuclear palsy. (Web site)

Rajput

  1. Rajput A, Rajput AH. 2001. Progressive supranuclear palsy: clinical features, pathophysiology and management.

Tau

  1. Genetic evidence for the involvement of tau in progressive supranuclear palsy. (Web site)

Positron Emission Tomography

  1. Foster NL, Gilman S, Berent S, et al: Cerebral hypometabolism in progressive supranuclear palsy studied with positron emission tomography. (Web site)

Brain

  1. Progressive supranuclear palsy involves damage to multiple cells of the brain.

Brain Atrophy

  1. Patterns of brain atrophy that differentiate corticobasal degeneration syndrome from progressive supranuclear palsy.

Cross-Sectional Study

  1. Schrag, A, Ben-Shlomo, Y, Quinn, NP. Prevalence of progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy: a cross-sectional study. (Web site)

Cases

  1. More specific details about cases of multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy and about atypical cases are reported elsewhere. (Web site)

Clinical Outcomes

  1. Clinical outcomes of progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy. (Web site)

Genetic Heterogeneity

  1. Pathological, clinical and genetic heterogeneity in progressive supranuclear palsy.

Shy-Drager Syndrome

  1. MR imaging in progressive supranuclear palsy and Shy-Drager syndrome. (Web site)

Symptoms Similar

  1. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease can present with symptoms similar to those of multiple system atrophy or progressive supranuclear palsy.

Patients

  1. Patients who have progressive supranuclear palsy have rigidity and bradykinesia, which may appear similar to early symptoms of Parkinson's disease.
  2. Diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy should be considered when patients have postural instability early on and limitation of downward gaze.
  3. In addition to gaze palsy, patients with progressive supranuclear palsy often exhibit macro-square wave jerks.

Disease

  1. Differing patterns of striatal 18 F-dopa uptake in Parkinson’s disease, multiple system atrophy, and progressive supranuclear palsy. (Web site)
  2. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy - Assay on the disease including general information on symptoms and treatment. (Web site)

Parkinsonism

  1. Parkinsonism may be seen in other degenerative conditions, known as the "parkinsonism plus" syndromes, such as progressive supranuclear palsy.
  2. Parkinsonism may be seen in other degenerative conditions, known as the parkinsonism plus syndromes, such as progressive supranuclear palsy.

Lewy Bodies

  1. Tsuboi Y, Ahlskog JE, Apaydin H, Parisi JE, Dickson DW. Lewy bodies are not increased in progressive supranuclear palsy compared with normal controls. (Web site)
  2. Lewy bodies are not increased in progressive supranuclear palsy compared with normal controls. (Web site)

Corticobasal Degeneration

  1. Cognitive and magnetic resonance imaging aspects of corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy. (Web site)
  2. Dickson DW. Neuropathologic differentiation of progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration. (Web site)

Psp

  1. A diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) had been considered in all three cases at initial presentation.
  2. A case of familial frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism (FTDP) similar to progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) was reported.
  3. The remaining two cases (16.6%) had histopathologic diagnoses of CJD and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), respectively.

Frontotemporal Dementia

  1. Boeve BF, Lang AE, Litvan I. Corticobasal degeneration and its relationship to progressive supranuclear palsy and frontotemporal dementia.

Tau Gene

  1. Background: The haplotype H1 of the tau gene, MAPT, is highly associated with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). (Web site)
  2. Familial atypical progressive supranuclear palsy associated with homozigosity for the delN296 mutation in the tau gene. (Web site)

Parkinson Disease

  1. Expression profiling of substantia nigra in Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism.

System Atrophy

  1. Examples of these other disease include progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, fragile X permutation, and dementia with Lewy bodies.
  2. MR imaging index for differentiation of progressive supranuclear palsy from Parkinson disease and the Parkinson variant of multiple system atrophy. (Web site)
  3. Cognitive deficits in progressive supranuclear palsy, Parkinson's disease, and multiple system atrophy in tests sensitive to frontal lobe dysfunction. (Web site)

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

  1. They include progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), and multiple system atrophy (MSA), among others.
  2. Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA) and dementia with Lewy body disease (DLB) are commoner disorders. (Web site)
  3. This group includes MSA, progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and a variety of less common disorders. (Web site)

Categories

  1. System Atrophy
  2. Tau Gene
  3. Psp
  4. Parkinson Disease
  5. Lewy Bodies
  6. Books about "Progressive Supranuclear Palsy" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Progressive Supranuclear Palsy"
  Originally created: March 09, 2007.
  Links checked: May 18, 2013.
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