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  Encyclopedia of Keywords > Music > Classical Music > Opera > Aria > Recitative   Michael Charnine

Keywords and Sections
FLUID ARIAS
EXPRESSIVE RECITATIVE
DISTINGUISHED
MANNER
SCORE
CHORAL
IRONIC
CHURCH MUSIC
VERSIFICATION
ARIOSO
RISE
MUSICAL FORM
FORMS
FIRST
ORCHESTRA
OVERTURE
OPERAS
SCARLATTI
BAROQUE ERA
CONTINUO
CHORUSES
CHORUS
ORATORIO
CANTATA
OPERA
SPOKEN DIALOGUE
ARIAS
ARIA
RECITATIVE
Review of Short Phrases and Links

    This Review contains major "Recitative"- related terms, short phrases and links grouped together in the form of Encyclopedia article.

Definitions

  1. Often a recitative is followed by an aria.
  2. Recitative is also occasionally used in musicals, being put to ironic use in the finale of Weill 's The Threepenny Opera.
  3. The recitative was first employed in opera, later in oratorios, passions, and cantatas.
  4. The recitative is part of the corresponding Bible reading for the week and the aria is a contemporary reflection on it.

Fluid Arias

  1. Declamation styles run the gamut from recitative to fluid arias to large choruses.

Expressive Recitative

  1. A more accessible type of opera can be seen in the romantic dramas of Faustini which Cavalli set in 1642-52 with expressive recitative and fluid arias.

Distinguished

  1. With this work, recitative began to be clearly distinguished from aria, an achievement that would prove decisive for opera's future success.

Manner

  1. Recitative - A form of writing for vocals that is close to the manner of speech and is rhythmically free.

Score

  1. Avoiding obvious jazz-style music, he wrote a score with hints of Richard Strauss, bluesy themes, stretches of recitative and several moving arias.

Choral

  1. All are characterized by Verdi's trademark: magnificent, sustained melodies in the standard forms of aria, recitative, and choral numbers.

Ironic

  1. It is indeed ironic that for 400 years, every reform movement and major innovation in opera has attempted to eliminate formal recitative.

Church Music

  1. His church music also uses operatic forms like the aria and recitative.

Versification

  1. The bulk of the versification was still recitative, however at moments of great dramatic tension there were often arioso passages known as arie cavate.

Arioso

  1. Melodic or semi-melodic passages occurring in the midst of, or instead of, recitative, are also referred to as arioso.
  2. They are built of sections in recitative, arioso and aria style, which proceed in a manner at once varied and unified.

Rise

  1. Its beginnings were in the late 16th-century revolt against polyphony that gave rise to the accompanied recitative and to opera.

Musical Form

  1. A compromise between these two main types of musical form, the aria and the recitative, emerged in the creation of the arioso.

Forms

  1. Recitative elements are often incorporated, showing the influence of Italian opera on purely instrumental forms.

First

  1. It consisted at first of a declamatory narrative or scene in recitative, held together by a primitive aria repeated at intervals.

Orchestra

  1. Wagner pioneered a through-composed style, in which recitative and aria blend into one another and are constantly accompanied by the orchestra.
  2. As in Wagner's works, the orchestra plays a leading role in Debussy's unique opera Pellas et Mlisande (1902) and there are no real arias, only recitative.

Overture

  1. Many of the features established in Baroque opera remained such as: the overture, recitative and aria, choral pieces.

Operas

  1. In his previous operas, Wagner had tried to make minimal use of recitative and scena ed aria.
  2. These new operas featured more range of emotion and less distinction between recitative and aria.
  3. Rameau had used accompanied recitative and the overture in his later operas reflected the action to come.

Scarlatti

  1. Scarlatti was one of the first opera composers to strongly differentiate the singing styles of aria and recitative.
  2. Scarlatti included recitative with developed arias in works that greatly resembled opera.

Baroque Era

  1. With opera and recitative came the figured bass, used consistently in ensemble music throughout the baroque era.

Continuo

  1. When crisply delivered and accompanied by simple chords in the continuo, the recitative is considered secco (dry); with orchestra, it is accompagnato.

Choruses

  1. Recitative grew less important, and choruses and dances virtually disappeared from Italian opera.

Chorus

  1. His operas move from the rigid use of conventional schemes toward a more flexible and dramatic treatment of recitative, arioso, aria, and chorus.

Oratorio

  1. Differing from the oratorio, church music of the time did not have a narrator or make use of a recitative.

Cantata

  1. With the rise of the da capo aria, the cantata became a group of two or three arias joined by recitative.

Opera

  1. Like them, the opera contains a large number of expressive dances, extensive use of the chorus and accompanied recitative.
  2. The use of recitative in opera is widely attributed to Galilei, since he was one of the inventors of monody, the musical style closest to recitative.
  3. Normally an opera is recorded aria by aria and recitative by recitative, but rarely in sequence.

Spoken Dialogue

  1. Some genres of opera use spoken dialogue accompanied or unaccompanied by an orchestra rather than recitative.
  2. The Threepenny Opera is a series of set numbers, with recitative and spoken dialogue.
  3. Weber completely eliminated spoken dialogue, producing a "through-composed" work where the distinction between recitative and aria is becoming blurred.

Arias

  1. In Germany, the cantata was mainly used to express sacred themes, with soloists 'reciting' biblical text (recitative) and singing poetic texts (arias).
  2. In Dafne he supplements the recitative of Peri and Caccini with arias and polyphonic choruses, giving a more varied whole.
  3. In the process, Wagner discarded elements of opera’s internal architecture and eliminated recitative, arias, and set pieces.

Aria

  1. Vocal Compositions: Recitative, aria, chorus, ensembles, lied, oratorio, mass.
  2. Gradually the cantata came to contain contrasting sections of recitative and aria separated by instrumental passages, often in the current operatic style.
  3. Musical elements included chorale, solo song, recitative and aria.

Recitative

  1. Vocal Compositions: Recitative, aria, arioso, chorus, motet, spiritual concerto, anthem, solo song.
  2. In some forms of opera, such as Singspiel, opéra comique, operetta, and semi-opera, the recitative is mostly replaced by spoken dialogue.
  3. Recitative: A musical work usually found in an opera or oratorio, which mimics the patterns of speech, in order to advance the story.

Categories

  1. Music > Classical Music > Opera > Aria
  2. Spoken Dialogue
  3. Arts > Music > Classical Music > Opera
  4. Music > Singing > Vocal Music > Cantata
  5. Music > Classical Music > Opera > Operetta
  6. Books about "Recitative" in Amazon.com

Book: Keywen Category Structure


  Short phrases about "Recitative"
  Originally created: August 01, 2010.
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